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Thread: Machine applique Circles

  1. #1
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    Machine applique Circles

    I am still new to applique and have a question for machine applique. I want to make a circles quilt that uses circles cut from a scratched DVD. I want to be able to fold over the edges in order to zig zag the edges so there is never any fraying. Is there a way to do this to keep the curve? I still can't get smooth curves using satin stitching and am kindof frustrated. Using just a zig zag I would likely get fraying when it was washed and dried.

    I'm trying to make a quilt like this.

    I should add that I do not want to use permanent interfacing. I don't like the feel of it on a large piece, so I was using dissolving interfacing.
    Last edited by IAmCatOwned; 02-27-2012 at 05:23 PM.

  2. #2
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    Use something heat safe as a template use a basting stitch around seam allowance, spray with starch press remove template, hope this makes sense

  3. #3
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I suggest using the DVD to make a template out of heat safe plastic

  4. #4
    Super Member sewbeadit's Avatar
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    Use your light interfacing or used dryer sheets and put the right sides together and sew around the circle. Cut a slit in the back of the interfacing turn it inside out clip curves and press to where it is nice and round then pin on fabric and just use a nice zig zag around. Easy and fast. You can use the interfacing and iron it on as well then zig zag.
    Sewbeadit
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    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-90945-1.htm
    This is one I have in my blog that you might use. I have a couple more if this doesn't work

  6. #6
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    Oh my gosh, these are all great ideas! I'm going to try them and see what works best for me.

  7. #7
    Junior Member mrsk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewbeadit View Post
    Use your light interfacing or used dryer sheets and put the right sides together and sew around the circle. Cut a slit in the back of the interfacing turn it inside out clip curves and press to where it is nice and round then pin on fabric and just use a nice zig zag around. Easy and fast. You can use the interfacing and iron it on as well then zig zag.
    I found this a VERY good idea! I have used it several times.

  8. #8
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    Wow, I was just thinking about a circle quilt last night! I saw a quilt and thought for sure I could imitate it without buying the pattern. I was thinking about doing the muslin trick with it and then after turning it right side out, I would clip away the muslin in the middle.
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  9. #9
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    I am curious why you can sew a zig zag in a circle but not a satin stitch, since a satin stitch is a zig zag stitch, only with the length of the stitch shortened. Can you control the speed of your machine?
    Last edited by TanyaL; 02-27-2012 at 08:02 PM.

  10. #10
    Super Member grammysharon's Avatar
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    Smile

    I use light interfacing and sew as stated below!! It is so easy and if you sew exactly on the line it will be a perfect circle!!! I use Superior Monofilament(spelling???) thread to stitch down the circle.
    Quote Originally Posted by sewbeadit View Post
    Use your light interfacing or used dryer sheets and put the right sides together and sew around the circle. Cut a slit in the back of the interfacing turn it inside out clip curves and press to where it is nice and round then pin on fabric and just use a nice zig zag around. Easy and fast. You can use the interfacing and iron it on as well then zig zag.
    Last edited by grammysharon; 02-27-2012 at 10:42 PM.
    A quilt is a blanket of love. Sharon

  11. #11
    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    I have seen these circular attachments for sewing machines http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=180NDoeRGDU This one is the Brother one but Bernina and Janome both make them as well.
    My DH is going to have a go at making one that clamps to my sewing table instead of the sewing machine. You would get a perfect circle every time.
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  12. #12
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    Cut the circle bigger. Take a running stitch around the edge. Put your heat proof template in place and draw the thread so it gathers around the disk. Spray with water and iron. Take out the disk. Pull out the thread. Pin in place and sew around the folded edge.
    Last edited by redmadder; 02-28-2012 at 03:44 AM.
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  13. #13
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    I use a feather weight fusible inter facing (Joanns). Cut circles same size as circle templates. Put glue side and right side of fabric together, sew around the edges. clip a slit on the inter facing side, turn right side out. Then I can place on my back ground fabric and iron into place. Then you can stitch into place and have no raw edges. This is how I did the circles on the centers of my Dresdan Plates also. You get a nice crisp rounded edge to your circles.

  14. #14
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I have used freezer paper...cut the finished size you want, cut fabric 1/4" larger, you can press the extra fabric around the freezer paper with your iron. I then use invisible or matching thread to use a sort of blind stitch or very narrow zig-zag to attach to background fabric. I then cut out fabric behind the circle, and the freezer paper can be removed at that time. Makes very smooth edged circles!

  15. #15
    Super Member alfosa421's Avatar
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    When I make circles I use coffee filters! Sew it attached to the right side of the fabric. Use pinking shears if you have them to cut around the outside edge-snip the middle of the coffee filter and turn Perfect circles every time!!

  16. #16
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    finished edges

    Was at 1/2 priced books yesterday. Saw a quilt book with lots of patterns using circles. The edges were covered with bias tape. No fraying; certainly would be able to match your fabrics in your block by making your own tape. Can't remember the name of the book . Sorry.

  17. #17
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    Measure to the right of the needle and tape a thumb tack with point up. Put the tack about 1/2" larger than 1/2 the diameter of the disk. Place the fabric with center punched down over the tack. Then slowly stitch with basting stitch turning the fabric as you stitch. This will give you an even circle of stitching. When finished then gather up the fabric around the disk. Tie thread and even out the edge. Spray edge with starch and remove the disk. You should have a good circle to then applique to base fabric.

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