Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Machine quilting patterns for hand-piecing quilts >

Machine quilting patterns for hand-piecing quilts

Machine quilting patterns for hand-piecing quilts

Old 11-18-2006, 08:47 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 358
Default

I'm just new to quilting and have been looking in many books. Can machine quilting patterns also be used for hand-piecing quilts as well. I've only done a hand pieced sampler quilt as my first quilting experience so I have many questions about the quilting process. Thank you.

Patty
NewsletterBot is offline  
Old 11-19-2006, 08:01 AM
  #2  
Administrator
 
PatriceJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Southeast Georgia, USA
Posts: 8,972
Default

I can't think of any reason you couldn't use any quilting pattern out there when hand-stitching.

For me, consideration of patterns works the other way 'round. The sewing machines in my price range have such small areas to work in, machine quilting any intricate pattern, or anything larger than a crib quilt is a nightmare. The only way I can do it and come out with a finished quilt I can be proud of is to use one of the various "quilt-as-you-construct" methods.
PatriceJ is offline  
Old 11-19-2006, 08:19 AM
  #3  
Super Member
 
Minda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,610
Default

Hi Patty, I've used machine patterns for hand piecing and had no problems. I agree with PatriceJ that for machine quilting the "quilt-as-you-construct" methods are great.
Minda is offline  
Old 11-24-2006, 06:32 PM
  #4  
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 28
Default

Would you explain "quilt-as-you-construct"??
Sibble is offline  
Old 11-24-2006, 07:49 PM
  #5  
Super Member
 
Minda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,610
Default

Hi Sibble, "Quilt-as-you-go" is a great way to construct and quilt 1 block or section of a quilt before you move on the next block or section. Here are some quilt sites that explain how to do it:

http://www.acornhillquilts.com/asyougo.htm

http://www.secretsof.com/content/194

http://www.quiltindex.com/ATQF/QandA_Single.aspx?QAID=58

Minda is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 05:22 AM
  #6  
Administrator
 
PatriceJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Southeast Georgia, USA
Posts: 8,972
Default

If my blocks are going to be separated by sashing, anyway, I avoid having to hand stitch anything by attaching the backing of the blocks to each other. After trimming the batting to lay flat, I sew the sashing onto the front using one of the 8 gazillion methods available. With narrow sashing ... say an inch or so ... there's nothing else to do. If the sashing is wider than 1.5 inches, I do a bit of quilting down the middle to make sure the batting stays flat.

Because I can be a bit of a clutz, I sometimes use an ultra-light weight double-sided fusing material to secure the sashing to the blocks, then topstitch down each side. That way I know the sashes will be properly centered and straight.
PatriceJ is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:21 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
foxxigrani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 755
Default

Any pattern can be used for hand sewing as well as machine. You just have to pay attention to seam allowance on both. As all the patterns are geared for 1/4" seams. There is some wonderful 1/4" tape out there that I used for the times I have pieced blocks by hand. Its wonderful and makes things so much easier to sew a straight line. I have trouble making straight lines even on sewing machine, you can imagine what my seams looked like by hand and nothing to guide me, yup you guessed it. So this stuff is wonderful and you can use a piece over and over again. It looks like masking tape, you will find it in any fabric store. But if you can't afford the tape, mark your seams by hand as you would for any piecing. Hope this helps.

Rita
foxxigrani is offline  
Old 09-02-2007, 10:27 AM
  #8  
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 9
Default

You can also take ANY pattern even from coloring books etc. and trace it onto paper and punch holes around pattern with the sewing machine without thread and a very large needle and then lay it on your quilt and take a sponge paint brush and pounce powder or cornstarch or baby powder and (use very little of it) and spread it onto your quilt as you finish one do it again and again until your quilt is hand quilted. Works very well. :lol:
quiltcrazy is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
elizajo
Main
12
04-18-2017 03:47 AM
Happy Treadler
Main
48
03-30-2011 07:43 AM
beginnerpiecer
Main
4
12-06-2009 07:54 AM
bookwormsub
Main
4
10-08-2009 09:43 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.