Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 68

Thread: Made half doz tops now. Is it silly to want a HQ Sweet Sixteen to learn to quilt on?

  1. #1
    Junior Member malfromcessnock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cessnock AU
    Posts
    187

    Made half doz tops now. Is it silly to want a HQ Sweet Sixteen to learn to quilt on?

    Hi ladies. I've now made half a dozen tops and am eager to getting them quilted. I've watched so many videos and been to so many QS and now have this desire to buy a HQ Sweet Sixteen before I take the plunge into the world of quilting.

    In your opinion - should I FIRST learn to quilt on my Janome P6600?

    Cheers,
    Cheers, Mal from Cessnock AU

  2. #2
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    7,159
    Blog Entries
    3
    I would learn first on whatever machine you have. You might change your mind about what you want after that. That said, I tried the HQ Sweet Sixteen at a quilt show and loved it! It is a big expense though. I am looking at a Juki now. They get good reviews and are under $1000, which is more in my affordability range. Ideally, I'd love to have a machine/frame, but I live in a small mobile and will never have room for one here.

  3. #3
    Super Member chairjogger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    My favorite place in the world is Lake Erie Region USA
    Posts
    2,753
    Blog Entries
    2
    Oh my! Do you have room for set up? The cost too. And I have seen results of those asking for thing to practice on...breaks my heart all the piecing done and a bad job on quilting. I think if you have time to practice on fabric first, room for once set up and keep up then enjoy. Save your tops for after your practice time. Good luck deciding on this investment. Have you checked out for used equipment..think this is from those that gave up.
    Sometimes you just have to sit in a chair and jog in order to get anywhere.
    Ell

  4. #4
    Junior Member malfromcessnock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cessnock AU
    Posts
    187
    I just wonder if learning on HQ will hasten my experience in achieving successful FMQ technique. Learning on my Janome 6600P is obviously doable but would I having learnt on that, and once I upgrade to the HQ SS say, "Oh, I wish I'd learnt on this in the first place!"
    I've played on the HQ SS and have a large sewing room - my former master bedroom. I have recently been on an eBay spree and have sold heaps of stuff I didn't use anymore, so have the funds.
    Sensible advice is so appreciated.
    Cheers, Mal from Cessnock AU

  5. #5
    Super Member nabobw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Pinellas Park Fl
    Posts
    4,966
    Blog Entries
    6
    NO you do not have to first learn how to quilt on your Janome as quilting with a long arm is so different. Good luck and have a ball.

  6. #6
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    29,699
    If you have the room and can afford it, GO FOR IT! I do a fair job on my domestic machine but boy if I had the room, I would have a long arm.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    208
    I tried the HQ SS16 and bought the HQ16 - so I would not have to sandwich the quilt top. Sandwiching the top prior to quilting it on the Sweet Sixteen was my determining factor between the two machines. You don't have to sandwich when you use the HQ16. I have been very happy with the HQ16. Using the Janome 6600 for FMQ is also a bunch of fun - I purchased the quilting foot for the 6600 and it is wonderful. Good Luck!!!

  8. #8
    Junior Member malfromcessnock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cessnock AU
    Posts
    187
    Ladies, would a HQ Sweet Sixteen hold it's resale value?
    Cheers, Mal from Cessnock AU

  9. #9
    Junior Member malfromcessnock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cessnock AU
    Posts
    187
    and so, is a HQ Sweet Sixteen considered a long arm?
    Last edited by malfromcessnock; 11-11-2012 at 05:01 AM. Reason: typo
    Cheers, Mal from Cessnock AU

  10. #10
    Junior Member malfromcessnock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cessnock AU
    Posts
    187
    ohstr, do you use Acu Feed when piecing on your 6600P?
    Cheers, Mal from Cessnock AU

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,419
    I say get the longarm. Learning to free motion quilt on a domestic machine won't help alot if you get a longarm later. I believe the HQ Sweet Sixteen is considered a longarm---it has a 16" throat, right? As for resale value, all longarms depreciate over time. If you have room for one, though, I would test drive as many brands of machines as you can before purchasing, and get the very best you can afford and have room for. Often you can get more bang for your buck if you buy a used machine. Figure out what features are most important to you, and focus on the brand of machine which best provides those features. Good luck!

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Thornton, Colorado
    Posts
    944
    Quote Originally Posted by malfromcessnock View Post
    Hi ladies. I've now made half a dozen tops and am eager to getting them quilted. I've watched so many videos and been to so many QS and now have this desire to buy a HQ Sweet Sixteen before I take the plunge into the world of quilting.

    In your opinion - should I FIRST learn to quilt on my Janome P6600?

    Cheers,
    I am not familiar with your Janome model, but assuming it is a domestic machine, it is different from quilting on a shortarm all the way up to longarm. On the domestic machine, the quilt top is moved around while the machine is not moved at all. It is the opposite with the longarm. The quilt top stays on the frame and the machine is moved to creat neat FMQ designs. It is fun. Pretend the needle is like a pencil and you are "drawing" with it.

    Do try out the machine first before buying it. There is a bit of learning curve, but well worth learning how to FMQ. l

  13. #13
    Senior Member jeank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Lapeer, Michigan
    Posts
    723
    I have the HQ16 and love it. I purchased used, so felt I got a good deal. My friend upgraded to a Gammill.

    Recently, two of my friends have purchased the Sunshine 16, they tested them at AQS show. Much cheaper. Both of them purchased the sit down version because they had no space for the long rails.

    To answer a previous question: a 16" machine is considered a mid-arm, but normally nobody makes that distinction.
    Jean in MI

  14. #14
    Junior Member malfromcessnock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cessnock AU
    Posts
    187
    So much great info from the members on this forum - I'm so glad I found you. Thanks so much for your help, encouragement and advice.
    Cheers, Mal from Cessnock AU

  15. #15
    Junior Member malfromcessnock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cessnock AU
    Posts
    187
    So far in my travels I've only seen the HQ Sweet Sixteen in Australia. No doubt there are more, but I haven't come across them yet.
    The HQSS seems so good - use any thread, top or bottom. Has a stitch regulator and many accessories like heaps of rulers although I want to use stencil paper the type you stitch without thread to apply your pattern to the paper then put the paper on your block and stitch over the dots.
    When I get good maybe it will be FMQ without any cheating. lol
    Cheers, Mal from Cessnock AU

  16. #16
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,460
    Blog Entries
    2
    18" and longer is really considered a long arm, the slightly smaller ones are mid-arms. I think you would always be able to sell it, but don't know for how much. Can you check AU resale sites (eBay etc.) and see what they are going for? Also, if there is a dealer in your area or a large show where a dealer would be I'd go to have a hands on demo. Even if you have to travel a bit (and stay the night) to get there. It's better to have a small amount invested in travel expenses than to buy something you don't like.
    Last edited by PaperPrincess; 11-11-2012 at 05:25 AM.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  17. #17
    Super Member eparys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    2,230
    If you can afford it and have the space - go for it. Free motion on the long arm is so much easier than free motion on you piecing machine. I have a Voyager 17 with a stitch regulator and I love it. I actually got it from a gal on this site who was looking to upgrade to a Avante. Have you looked at the used market? You might be able to find something that costs less than a new machine or if you have the money and space maybe even a larger throat machine. I sometimes wish that the throat was larger than 17" on mine. When you get into an oversized queen quilt the more you quilt the less room there is in the throat. Also, mine has a small standard sewing machine bobbin (size L) and I can do just one dense pass before I change bobbins. Several of the machines use size M which has a larger capacity for thread.

    By the time you pay for someone to longarm your dozen tops you will have a down payment on the HQ16!! LOL Do not know about the resale in AU but here in the states the HQ has great resale value. I find it fun and do not regret my purchase!! Good luck - let us know what you get!!
    Betty

    A quilt will warm your body and comfort your soul.

    http://notesfrommoosehaven.blogspot.com

  18. #18
    Senior Member crashnquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Lebanon, Missouri
    Posts
    606
    My sister and I learned FMQ on our domestic machines. We went to a show and Sis bought the HQ sit down model and I bought the HQ with frame and table. Both of us came to the same conclusion, WHY DID WE WASTE OUR TIME USING OUR DOMESTIC MACHINES?! There is no comparison between domestic and longarm. These are two totally different experiences. On the sit down model you do not get "drag" on the quilt like on the domestic. If you are using a high loft batt, you can adjust your hopping foot height on the HQ. Sis has the sit down model and LOVES LOVES LOVES IT. She doesn't have to "battle" the quilt like you have to with a domestic. In fact, sis even replaced a heavy zipper in a coat with her HQ. She said it went in like a breeze.
    I hope this info helps. Regarding the resale value, I really can't give any advice there. Also, you might take a look at the HQ website in the forums. You might be able to find a really good deal on a used machine.
    Crashnquilt


    Wouldn't you like to live with my mind just for a moment? I wish you would, I think I need to get OUT OF IT!

  19. #19
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    798
    I learned to quilt on my mechanical Singer. I have just purchased a Baily 17" with Majestic frame. I cannot wait to load a quilt on it. It is still in the boxes due to the storm, but any day now it will be up and running.
    My suggestion is to learn on the machine you have. It is an uphill struggle any way you look at it but it will give you valuable experience.

  20. #20
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    12,402
    I know that there are also Innovas in Australia, because I've seen posts from Innova dealers in the Innova yahoo groups. I'm sure there are other brands available as well. Before taking the plunge, I would advise finding out more about what is available. You might join some of the yahoo groups and ask to hear from others in AU.

    The definition of a longarm vs midarm vs shortarm varies. The most consistent definition I've heard is that a longarm is at least 18", so the sweet 16 would be a midarm.

  21. #21
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,890
    Quilting on the HQ SS is different from quilting on a DSM. So ... if you have the $ and space go for it. You may get a good discount on a show machine or find, maybe even through the dealer or on your own, a used HQ SS from someone who traded up.

    I have the HQ 16 and love it. Have gradually enlarged the length of the bed to as long as my studio will allow. Darn it not full length.

    HQ's are considered mid-arms but function as long arms. Only the elite get upset by this though as the results are the same,. The only difference being size.

    Heck, I couldn't even get the full grown HQ 16 in my living room, let alone a long-arm, due to all the doorways the thing would block. However a friend did install her Statler Stitcher in her living room and there is a narrow area around it to work and to get into the rest of her home. She does it for income though.

    ali
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  22. #22
    Senior Member QuiltNama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Duluth/ Superior, WI
    Posts
    933
    If you have the funds and space GO FOR IT! It is so much easier to learn FM on a LA (midarm). I have the HQ16 and love it. We always eat in the kitchen so took over the dining room for my machine. I have quilted on my domestic and find it so much easier on the LA. JMHO

  23. #23
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Knot Merrill, Southern Indiana
    Posts
    5,713
    Mal

    I have the Janome 6600 and I FMQ on it. I also tried the HQ Sweet 16 (and the Baby Lock Tiara) and both are lovely machines and I want one! I have a hard time *justifying* the cost of a machine that "only" quilts ... but seriously ... the more I think about it the more I want (need) it!! I simply don't want to donate the space that a long arm on frame would take so the table model mid/long arms are the perfect answer for me.

    When I sat down at the Sweet 16 I was right at home as the set up (being a table mounted mid-arm) is identical to how I learned to FMQ on my Janome with a few slight differences - beneficial differences!!! The first difference is obvious ... space! The second difference is the speed control on the machine which I loved. I did not like the stitch regulator at all ... so suggest you try that and see how you like it. You might be able to save $1200.00. Using the Sweet 16 with the stitch regulator was to me a much different experience than FMQ on my Janome. Using the machine with the speed control was very similar - with more control - as FMQ on my Janome.

    If I were you I would at least make a few small practice sandwiches on your Janome (have you done that yet?) and see how you like FMQ. Just make a few 9" samples ... try writing your name, stipling, and perhaps one or two other designs. Some people never take to FMQ so it would be wise to at least try it (assuming you haven't yet). It doesn't have to look right at this point, it only has to FEEL right to you. You need to be able to say "yes - with practice it will look right!!". If you can do that, then spring for the Sweet 16. Once you have it, you can further hone your skills.

    BTW - I'm sure you've figured it out, but a lot of the previous comments made by others are applicable to a standard long arm on a frame - not the sit down mid/long arm models that we are talking about. FMQ on these sit down machines is almost identical to FMQ on our domestic because we move the quilt ... not the machine head. I have tried - and HATED - the standard frame mounted machine heads.
    Last edited by DogHouseMom; 11-11-2012 at 07:36 AM.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  24. #24
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    northern California
    Posts
    1,084
    I have a Janome 6600 and have quilted huge quilts with it and have no intention ever to send out my quilts to be done by someone else. The biggest quilt I did was a super queen size and it had more than one inch thick appliques on it. While I admire a lot of the beautiful long arm quilting that is done today, it does not always complement the basic pieced quilt. Some quilting makes the pattern fade, rather than enhancing it. I guess my answer is, if you are rich enough, and feel the need, go ahead and get a long, or mid arm. If you feel good about what you have been doing, stay with it. The Janome 6600 has a nice throat area, but it isn't a long arm by any means. Don't get a new quilting machine just to be in the "current fad". That's not worth it.

  25. #25
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,807
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    If you have the room and can afford it, GO FOR IT! I do a fair job on my domestic machine but boy if I had the room, I would have a long arm.
    ME TOO! Larger throat, stitch regulator and it is always set up for the quilting and then go back to your Janome which is set up elsewhere in your room for piecing and other sewing. WIN WIN all around.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.