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Thread: make your own Heavy Starch

  1. #26
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    Knew you could, but didn't know how. Thanks for the recipe.

  2. #27
    Senior Member jetmaio's Avatar
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    wow thanks, am just in the process of spray starching my pieces. I wrote the recipe and will have it done shortly thanks to you.

    Funny this just brought to mind my aunt's curtain stretcher and her dipping her crochet bowls in sugar.

  3. #28
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    Quote Originally Posted by clem55
    My mom always made laundry starch that way, and while I am not positive, I think she used to add a small piece of something called bluing. It made the whites and colors brighter. She made her own lye soap for laundry too!!
    yes...bluing...I am not sure if we can find that any more..but it sure worked great for the whites...
    i actually still have some and Linit starch, only use it when doing up the family Christening dress,slip,bonnett

  4. #29
    Super Member mountain deb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    Quote Originally Posted by clem55
    My mom always made laundry starch that way, and while I am not positive, I think she used to add a small piece of something called bluing. It made the whites and colors brighter. She made her own lye soap for laundry too!!
    yes...bluing...I am not sure if we can find that any more..but it sure worked great for the whites...
    The bluing is still out there. I came across it about a year ago and got it.

  5. #30
    Senior Member jcrilley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cosy
    A bit of a de-rail:
    My grandmother would use a bit of bluing in the final rinse after shampooing her beautiful white hair, just enough to tint the water a very pale blue. the origin of the phrase, "blue haired ladies"
    And always in the rinse water of the "lily white" batch of laundry, a little darker blue. That stuff is potent, even more so than food coloring.
    And just for fun,
    "In a glass or plastic bowl, put some pieces of coal, coke (charcoal-like substance, charcoal, porous brick, tile, cement or sponge.
    Day 1: Over the base material, pour two tablespoons of water, two of table salt (iodized or plain) and two of Mrs. Stewart's Bluing.

    Day 2: Add two more tablespoons of salt.

    Day 3: Pour into the bottom of the bowl (not directly on the base material) two tablespoons each of salt, water, and Mrs. Stewart's Bluing, and then add a few drops of mercurochrome, vegetable coloring or ink to each piece.

    By this time a beautiful flower-like growth should have appeared. If all the conditions are not ideal, it may be necessary to add two tablespoons of household ammonia to aid the growth. A free circulation of air is necessary, and these formations will develop better where the air is dry.

    To keep it growing: Add more MSB, salt and water from time to time. It will "bloom" indefinitely into beautiful rosebuds, coral and crystal. Try it!" From Mrs. Stewarts Bluing website. for some dumb reason (the faulty finger/keyboard interface), I couldn't do a direct link.
    That bottle of blueing was a staple at our house,and I have made many a crystal garden. Wonder if I still have a bottle in the deep recesses? I should start another.
    and I have cooked many a kettle of Faultless starch for my dad's and brothers' dress shirts before the days of perma press.
    We always called this a "Depression Garden"

  6. #31
    Senior Member ncredbird's Avatar
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    I have had white hair since I was in my 30's. My hair dresser told me it would brighten it up if I put a few drops of bluing in my shampoo. A very inexpensive way to get the "Silver" shampoo at a big discount. I have been doing this for years. Ann in TN

  7. #32
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    Mama and Mamaw always made their own starch, lye,soap and homeny in the wash pot out back over a fire. They made their starch with flour. Prepared the same was as this. Then after the clothes were dry, sprinkled, rolled up and put in a towel , put in the frig for a while, seems over night was best. the white clothes were boiled in the washpot and bluing was put in the rinse water. That was the "good ole days" when clothes were scrubed on a washboard and your knuckles got skinned,hands got raw from the hot water, and froze on the clothes line when hanging out clothes to dry in the winter, and clothes got bird droppings on them in the summer. All that water had to be drawn from a well.
    Our toilet was out back with bugs and spiders if it wasn't kept scrubbed and limed.
    grass was mowed with a push mower (not powered except by muscle)
    Yeah, I remember the good ole days.
    Sorry for the length of this but when I started about the starch the rest just rolled out.

  8. #33
    Member She In PA's Avatar
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    You can use any food coloring on it. My mom use to call this "Depression Garden". Like a poor mans garden.

  9. #34
    Super Member Happy Linda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glassquilt
    Another starch - not heavy
    1Tbs. Elmer's School Glue
    3 C. Warm Water
    How do you mix this? The other recipe used boiling water then boiled it.

  10. #35
    Super Member LindaMRB's Avatar
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    ...and just as my store-bought stuff was running out!
    Great timing!
    Thanks.

  11. #36
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I've used this recipe many times. My grandmother used to make starch. She never kept it for more then one ironing day as it started to smell funny after a few days. It can be kept in the fridge for a couple of weeks and has to be shaken up before each use as it separates fast. I can still find the powdered Faultless starch and it is wonderful! Also Mrs. Stewarts's Laundry Bluing is sold in grocery stores here. Amazon sells it.

  12. #37
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    Did you know that you can make your own heavy duty spray starch for under .20 cents ?! Here's a simple, do it yourself recipe.

    1/4 c. Corn Starch
    1/2 c. Cold water
    1 qt Boiling Water

    Dissolve the cornstarch in the cold water, stirring well. Pour dissolved starch mix into boiling water, bring to boil, cook 2 minutes over medium heat. Remove from heat, cool. This makes a Heavy Starch, great for laundry or crafts.

    ****If you plan on storing this for any length of time, add 1 Tbs. of Lemon Juice as a preservative. It will prevent spoilage/mold.***
    this is how my Mom starched our clothes years ago, old memories , the clothes could stand alone :roll:

  13. #38
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    clem55 wrote:
    My mom always made laundry starch that way, and while I am not positive, I think she used to add a small piece of something called bluing. It made the whites and colors brighter. She made her own lye soap for laundry too!!

    As for the blueing, it also works to put a small amount into your shampoo if you have white or gray hair to keep the yellow out! My late Aunt told me that trick that she used long ago. She always had snow white hair(as long as I remembered her) and I do also. Either cut it often or use the bluing in your shampoo. Not too much, maybe a tablespoon in a new bottle of shampoo!

  14. #39
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Cosy, thanks for memories. We made those in Girls Scouts when I was growing up. I think we called them clinker gardens. Fun. I will have to impress my grandkids.

  15. #40
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    I'm going to try the "Depression Garden" too. I'm wondering if you can still get Mercurochrome???

  16. #41
    Senior Member dahlshouse's Avatar
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    Thank you so much for the info/formula...

  17. #42
    Super Member Marysewfun's Avatar
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    My Mom used to dampen laundry (to be ironed) and put in a plastic bag in the freezer and then pull it out when she was ready to iron. :-) (Hmmm, I don't remember ever having to go into the freezer looking for anything either!)

    Marysewfun

  18. #43
    Super Member Marysewfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetmaio
    wow thanks, am just in the process of spray starching my pieces. I wrote the recipe and will have it done shortly thanks to you.

    Funny this just brought to mind my aunt's curtain stretcher and her dipping her crochet bowls in sugar.
    Yes, I remember a neighbor used to "stiffen" her doilies so they would sort of ruffle on the table and then put a candy dish or lamp in the middle. Oh, the fun of memories! :-)

    Marysewfun

  19. #44
    Super Member redkimba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    Did you know that you can make your own heavy duty spray starch for under .20 cents ?! Here's a simple, do it yourself recipe.

    1/4 c. Corn Starch
    1/2 c. Cold water
    1 qt Boiling Water

    Dissolve the cornstarch in the cold water, stirring well. Pour dissolved starch mix into boiling water, bring to boil, cook 2 minutes over medium heat. Remove from heat, cool. This makes a Heavy Starch, great for laundry or crafts.

    ****If you plan on storing this for any length of time, add 1 Tbs. of Lemon Juice as a preservative. It will prevent spoilage/mold.***
    I used this recipe to starch the brim of one my sunbonnets about a year ago. I wore the sunbonnet recently - that brim was STILL stiff from this stuff.

  20. #45
    Junior Member judord's Avatar
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    Wow, that sounds like hard work, and I know it was. And we think we have it tough! :lol:

  21. #46

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    That is an old one - I remember my mother always made starch this way. She would be 114 years old if still living.
    She also used blueing in the rinse water to whitten the whites. My how things have changed.

  22. #47
    Member TeeGee's Avatar
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    Mrs. Stewart's Concentrated Liquid Bluing
    in the laundry aisle at my local grocery store

  23. #48
    Senior Member ploverwi2's Avatar
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    My mom used to always sprinkle her laundry, roll it up put it in a plastic bag, and place it in the fridge over night. Boy, does that bring back childhood memories.

  24. #49

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    That's the one, did not know it was still around. My mother also sprinkled the clothing and rolled it up, put in a bushel basket overnight, then ironed the next day. Yes, sometimes old memories are the best, but always keep an eye on tommarow.

  25. #50
    Super Member RobertaMarie's Avatar
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    Jackie, I am old enough I remember making starch to do my cotton clothes and laundry! Starched and ironed all cotton dresses, aprons, blouses, skirts, husbands shirts, kids school clothes, table cloths, pillow cases,dresser scarves, doilies, etc. With the onset of permanent press and automatic driers, it went by the wayside. I learned all this from my sweet mother who did that and most of the early years in laundry tubs outdoors and we carried water in buckets, heated in a tub over a fire and hung things on a line. "Good old days"? Sometimes I think they were, but I am grateful we don't have to do it now. :)

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