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Thread: MDF Boards

  1. #1
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    I have two questions: what are MDF boards; and has anyone on this board done a tutorial on FMQ a large quilt on a domestic machine? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    MDF stands for Medium Density Fiberboard. It is essentially the same as plywood.

  3. #3
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    The first question can be answered here:

    http://www.abchomestore.com/what_is_mdf.htm

    the second someone else will have to answer.:)

    We were typing at the same time, gaigai. Actually it is more like particleboard than plywood the way I understand what I read on google.

  4. #4
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    MDF boards are medium-density fibre boards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    The first question can be answered here:

    http://www.abchomestore.com/what_is_mdf.htm

    the second someone else will have to answer.:)

    We were typing at the same time, gaigai. Actually it is more like particleboard than plywood the way I understand what I read on google.
    Yeah, I noticed! LOL. I want to make a bigboard ironing board using MDF. What I see at the store looks more like plywood to me, rather than the sawdust & glue particle board, but I think they are all very similar.

  6. #6
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    Would your ironing board hold that? I'm thinking the same thing but am worried about my antique wood ironing board holding a slab of the stuff.

  7. #7
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Be aware that MDF is very heavy. A 4x8 sheet of " MDF weighs nearly 100 lbs. It is also very dusty to cut.

  8. #8
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    I think I'm going with the ready make folding table my hubby suggested. He will make the big board and lay it on there rather than my precious ironing board which belonged to my grandma! He just doesn't know it yet!

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    Thank you, everyone.

  10. #10
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    Be aware that MDF is very heavy. A 4x8 sheet of " MDF weighs nearly 100 lbs. It is also very dusty to cut.
    So true. MDF has a greater chance to warp also. I've used OSB subfloor
    as Sharon Schamber recommended and it works great. I'm going to make
    another one to cover my ironing board.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EasyPeezy
    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider
    Be aware that MDF is very heavy. A 4x8 sheet of " MDF weighs nearly 100 lbs. It is also very dusty to cut.
    So true. MDF has a greater chance to warp also. I've used OSB subfloor
    as Sharon Schamber recommended and it works great. I'm going to make
    another one to cover my ironing board.
    Yeah, that is one thing that has been stopping me. I've never heard of the OSB. I'll have to check it out. Thanks for the tip.

    OK, I checked it out and it says that plywood and OSB are "virtually identical". I also found several DIYS bigboard instructions/tutes that use plywood and say 22x60 is very manageable.

  12. #12
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    the other thing to think about is that MDF swells up and distorts when it gets wet...if you use it, be sure to put a waterproof barrier between the wood and the steam from the iron.

  13. #13
    Super Member greenini's Avatar
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    Isn't there a marine grade plywood that would resist water better?

  14. #14
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    Both mdf and osb have a tendency to ummmm how to explain? well it can chip out a bit since it is bits and pieces and glue, which can then catch your fabric, mdf would be great with that clear plastic table covering you can get at Walmart
    My two cents
    David

  15. #15
    Junior Member mannem's Avatar
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    CDX plywood is ment for outdoor use. It is made with different glue, however C and D stand for lesser quality with furniture grade plywood having A and B sides. Naturally the cost is much higher for AB. If you cover CDX with batting and an old bedsheet, you will get a terrific ironing board. I nailed and glued 2" strips of plywood underneath unto 3 sides to stable it further. It fits over my regular folding ironing board OR between kitchen counter and center island.

  16. #16
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I know that OSB is a lot cheaper than plywood and will not warp.
    Not so sure about plywood.

  17. #17
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidwent
    Both mdf and osb have a tendency to ummmm how to explain? well it can chip out a bit since it is bits and pieces and glue, which can then catch your fabric, mdf would be great with that clear plastic table covering you can get at Walmart
    My two cents
    David
    You don't press your fabric directly on the OSB. It needs a layer of batting then canvas goes over it. Here's the link to Sharon Schamber's
    video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LGbXou_u4c

    Edited: Sorry, no muslin...just batting and canvas.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Katia's Avatar
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    I just built a quilting board to go over my sewing machine cabinet yesterday out of MDF and it is working wonderfully. The cabinet normally holds my Kenmore but she has been acting up lately and my Bernina does FMQ much better. So I switched them. But the Bernina sits up higher then the Kenmore did. I needed to raise up my surface just a half an inch.

    I bought a half inch thick x 2x4 foot piece of MDF in the precuts section at Home Depot. I did not want to mess with the big piece. The piece I got was not too heavy and is easy to manage. When I got it home I drew out the cuts I wanted and my husband cut them out for me. He used a fine blade so the edges were smooth. There needed to be two pieces. One for the basic table overlay and then the smaller piece in the front where the bobbin is. I kept it really simple.

    Then I covered it all in light batting. I had fusible that I use for purses so I used that. Which worked great because it did fuse to the board. I had to cut it where the hole was for the sewing machine. I taped it on the back. I could have stapled, but MDF is hard and I also did not want staples scratching the cabinet top. After the batting I covered it with fabric. Then I covered the whole thing with plastic. I used the fairly heavy stuff, I think it was called deluxe weight at Walmart.

    The only problem I ran into was the front inset piece was too fat. So I had to take it apart and take out the batting. I wanted it to be tight so it would not wiggle and the plastic seems to keep it stuck in there pretty good.

    I think it turned out pretty well and does not look too silly. I did some quilting on it last night and it worked really well. I used to plastic, not to keep anything clean, but so the quilt will slide around easily.

    I don't think moisture will be a problem here. But I was planning to make a top for my ironing board using a similar technique. I had not thought of moisture effecting the MDF though. I was thinking of using insulbrite. But would that have enough moisture protection? I was thinking about using the same size, 2'x4'. But I was also thinking I would have my husband add two strips of wood on the underside to keep it stable on the regular ironing board. I was even thinking of attaching webbing straps on the underside to keep it from falling. Sure do not want that thing crashing down on my foot. Oh well, a project for another day.
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