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Thread: This might be a dumb ? but...

  1. #1
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    Is there any way to add a trim around a finished quilt? What I mean is does anyone sew a ruffle on or something like that? I chickened out on trying to add the border I bought, which was a two inch blanket binding. I wasn't sure how to do it, or follow instructions and was afraid I'd mess it up after all the work. I'd rather have it more plain, than chance it. Can I still machine stitch a binding around it? Any advice or ideas? Maybe I will just quit while I'm ahead, but I guess I'm thinking it needs a little something more.

  2. #2

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    I'm not sure what 'blanket' binding is...but, I use pieces from my quilt to make my own binding. I cut 2 1/2" strips and sew them together on an angle until I have more then enough to go all the way around the edge of the quilt. I fold this strip in half, and press..then.. I trim the outside edge of the quilt leaving about 1/4" of the batting sticking out on the very edge. Then I sew down the binding, all the way around,(Sewing the strip to the edge of the fabric) then flip it over to the back and will pin and hand whip it down all the way around or sew it in place. Make sense at all? I hope this helps:)LOL Very simple and quick and the binding matches my quilt:)Skeat

  3. #3

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    Oops...here's a thread already going on binding and info on binding at: http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/24321.page


    More ideas!! And, a great help there...Skeat

  4. #4
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    I am not sure what you mean . How did you finish the edges ? Are the edges finished now ? I believe that blanket binding is the same as a quilt binding . Someone will correct me if I am wrong.

  5. #5
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    If you want to put a ruffle around your quilt, the best way is to make it like a Quillow where you sew the quilt togather, leave an opening and turn it right side out.
    If you already quilted your quilt this would not work.

  6. #6
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    That is how I made my quilt. It is tied, not machine or hand quilted. I just have to stitch it closed. Am thinking now that maybe the two don't go together, ruffles and ties? They might not compliment each other. But I'm experimenting here. I just think some sort of edge makes a much nicer finished look. What if I knotted yarn all the way around to make a fringe? That would blend with the ties, if I use the same color, do you think?? Of course, that might make it look like a rug, lol! Maybe I should post the pic and ask.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Marie
    If you want to put a ruffle around your quilt, the best way is to make it like a Quillow where you sew the quilt togather, leave an opening and turn it right side out.
    If you already quilted your quilt this would not work.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Do you still have a raw edge on your quilt? If so, it's common to finish it with a binding. You could use wide blanket binding, but it would be very difficult to sew on without a lot of rippling. Traditional quilt binding methods would be much easier.

    Traditional quilt bindings do not have to be narrow, but they usually are. If you want a border around your quilt, you usually work that into your top design rather than adding it as a binding.

    There are ways to add a ruffle, prairie points, etc. also.

  8. #8
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    Wasn't sure of that myself! A little confusing to me. On the package it says "blanket binding." I have other thin ones that say "bias binding." It's folded in half and has a tiny finished edge.
    Quote Originally Posted by sharon b
    I am not sure what you mean . How did you finish the edges ? Are the edges finished now ? I believe that blanket binding is the same as a quilt binding . Someone will correct me if I am wrong.

  9. #9
    Esqmommy's Avatar
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    Post the picture - the visual will be helpful.

  10. #10
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    Thank you, Skeat!
    Quote Originally Posted by Skeat
    Oops...here's a thread already going on binding and info on binding at: http://www.quiltingboard.com/posts/list/24321.page


    More ideas!! And, a great help there...Skeat

  11. #11
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    Ok, will do that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Esqmommy
    Post the picture - the visual will be helpful.

  12. #12
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Blanket binding is usually a satin-like fabric that is pre-folded to finish about 2 inches wide. Basically you are expected to enclose the blanket edge and machine sew near the edge of the binding, attaching both sides at one time. Blanket manufacturers have special sewing machines to feed everything very evenly and keep the stitching line where it's supposed to be. I think it would be very hard to do this well at home, especially since the binding fabric is very slippery.

    I do not like to use purchased narrow binding on a quilt.

    Most of the quilt instructions you will find online and in books describe the "double-fold" binding technique.

    Here is a Youtube video that shows a way to attach binding completely by machine. However, this is only one of many good ways to attach binding. It's hard to see, but she is attaching a strip of fabric that has been folded in half, wrong sides together. In that first step, she is sewing the raw edges of that strip to the raw edge of the quilt. Most quilters prefer using this double layer of fabric for binding because the binding gets the most abuse from usage.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wprg5vzkuGw



  13. #13
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    Ok, here are the pics that show the ties, and the binding I was trying to explain. Thanks everyone for your help, I wouldn't be able to do this without you!!

  14. #14
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    Ha, I knew I'd get a turn at being trigger happy. Hold on a sec. : )

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  16. #16
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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  17. #17
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Your quilt sandwich looks thin enough that the wide blanket binding might work. The hardest parts would be sewing it on without the binding rippling, catching both the underneath and the top parts in your machine stitching, and keeping the stitching an even distance from the binding edge. You really want to use a walking foot for this if you have one. Also, could you make up a test sample for yourself before tackling the quilt? That would help you figure out stitch length (you probably want it a little longer than usual), how close together you want to pin, etc.

  18. #18
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    There are some great books about finishing and binding quilts that include piping, prairie points, ruffles, scalloped binding and assorted others.

  19. #19
    Super Member Shemjo's Avatar
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    Won't help on this one, but when you do your next one, Lay your backing right sides together with your top with the batting under the top. Then stitch around the edges leaving an unsewn place to "burp" or "birth" your quilt (turn right sides out) and then just whip the unsewn area. Saves lots of frustration, then you can tie your quilt! :lol:

  20. #20
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    I'll have to put this on my list. Sounds like a good investment when I gather the $$.
    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    There are some great books about finishing and binding quilts that include piping, prairie points, ruffles, scalloped binding and assorted others.

  21. #21
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    Thanks. I don't have a walking foot. Sounds like some precarious sewing to get it right. Thinking I should file this under "better luck next time." : )
    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Your quilt sandwich looks thin enough that the wide blanket binding might work. The hardest parts would be sewing it on without the binding rippling, catching both the underneath and the top parts in your machine stitching, and keeping the stitching an even distance from the binding edge. You really want to use a walking foot for this if you have one. Also, could you make up a test sample for yourself before tackling the quilt? That would help you figure out stitch length (you probably want it a little longer than usual), how close together you want to pin, etc.

  22. #22
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    That's too funny, burp or birth. I think this is what I did, almost. My directions said to lay the batting down, put the backing right side up and the top right side down on the backing. I left an opening to turn it through. I got to refine my stitching closed techniques for sure. Just need more practice, I guess. Thanks, Shemjo.
    Quote Originally Posted by Shemjo
    Won't help on this one, but when you do your next one, Lay your backing right sides together with your top with the batting under the top. Then stitch around the edges leaving an unsewn place to "burp" or "birth" your quilt (turn right sides out) and then just whip the unsewn area. Saves lots of frustration, then you can tie your quilt! :lol:

  23. #23
    *QuilterWannabee*'s Avatar
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    Going to check it out, thanks alot!
    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan

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