Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 98

Thread: Need help from my Southern and Southwestern Quilting Sisters

  1. #1
    Super Member seamstome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,338
    I finally have my sewing room and equipment to a point where it is almost exactly where I want it.

    I have one big problem though. The AC in my room doesnt cut it. I talked to my AC guy and he says I have enough airflow that it is the heat from the iron, the lights and the fact the room is on the second floor with a full southern exposure and the fourth wall is the garage attic. He suggested insulation which is going to cost as much as a long arm. My room can easily reach 100 with the main house AC set at 70.

    Fans do not cut it. I have a ceiling fan and two others in the room. I have resorted to setting the whole house to 60 to get my room to about 80.

    I tried to get a window air unit but the windows are side by side cranks. The only thing I could get was a portable unit but I really dont have a way to vent it.

    How do you all deal with the heat and sun when you quilt in the summer? Can I use one of those portable AC's and "vent" it to the hallway without getting carbon monoxide poisoning?

  2. #2
    np3
    np3 is offline
    Power Poster np3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    14,032
    Blog Entries
    7
    Your utility bills will be very high if you keep that up. I don't think his answer makes much sense. More likely that the point where your thermostat reads the temperature is too far away from your sewing room. I would try a fan first. Let it circulate the hot air out into the hall or rest of the house.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    KC MO
    Posts
    1,401
    Blog Entries
    6
    There is a portable AC unit you can get and vent it outside. They have them at Lowes...Home Depot and even WalMart. I have one in my sewing room and love it.

  4. #4
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Riverside Washington
    Posts
    1,513
    For years our only AC was a roll around swamp cooler only about the size of a dehumidifer and it worked great sometimes to cool but just turned it off when comfy. Dont remember the brand name. then it was less than $100.No outside vent needed.

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,092
    Blog Entries
    1
    The portables that vent through the windows should work. They come with an insert that should fit in your crank windows too, or a thick piece of plexiglass cut to size would also work :D:D:D

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    531
    Maybe try managing the heat that you can control in the room so your AC can do its job. For instance, put your iron on a surge protector. That way, you just use the on/off button on the protector to turn your iron off while not in use, then just hit the button to turn it on a few minutes before you will need it. Also, you can use the spiral type light bulbs in your lamps, they don't give off heat. Insulated curtains on your windows will help with afternoon sun (or you could replace those windows with some that have a Argon between the two panes. That way, light comes in naturally, but the Argon keeps it from heating up your room).

    Just some thoughts for you. :-D :-D

  7. #7
    Senior Member Kat Sews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    646
    This issue was addressed in the latest issue of our electric coop news letter. It suggested opening windows on upwind side of house wider than downwind side to create more air flow while ac is off. With ac on open slightly the attic access door or a window at the highest level of the house. They also said that the way you open the blinds makes a difference. In summer tilt the blind slats up toward the outside. this helps keep heat from the window from moving into the room. In winter reverse direction to help keep cold out of the room. I will try these ideas this summer and see if it helps.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ruck9085's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    764
    Me, I use a small window unit. We have the side by side windows, too, but DH opened one of the windows, set the unit in the window, then places plywood over the rest of the opening and used insulation to block any cracks. The unit works really well. I turn it on about thirty minutes before I start and by the time I go in, the room is comfortably cool. Give it shot. Oh, and the small unit only raised our light bill by about twenty bucks, well worth it, if you ask me.

  9. #9
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The middle of an IL cornfield
    Posts
    7,024
    Blog Entries
    1
    We have found that our upstairs rooms similar to what you describe stays more comfortable using the giant attic fan than the AC. I have no idea what it cost to put in, but if you close everything else up and just open windows in a couple of rooms it will create enough breeze to cool just about anyone down.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    123
    Blog Entries
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by seamstome
    I finally have my sewing room and equipment to a point where it is almost exactly where I want it.

    I have one big problem though. The AC in my room doesnt cut it. I talked to my AC guy and he says I have enough airflow that it is the heat from the iron, the lights and the fact the room is on the second floor with a full southern exposure and the fourth wall is the garage attic. He suggested insulation which is going to cost as much as a long arm. My room can easily reach 100 with the main house AC set at 70.

    Fans do not cut it. I have a ceiling fan and two others in the room. I have resorted to setting the whole house to 60 to get my room to about 80.

    I tried to get a window air unit but the windows are side by side cranks. The only thing I could get was a portable unit but I really dont have a way to vent it.

    How do you all deal with the heat and sun when you quilt in the summer? Can I use one of those portable AC's and "vent" it to the hallway without getting carbon monoxide poisoning?
    I use a fan when it get to hot. my sewing room is also southfacing.

    Did you make the Bail star? I see it is your avatar. If you did was it very hard to make. I just love that pattern

  11. #11
    Senior Member quiltnmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    New Bern, NC
    Posts
    517
    Only thing I can think of is maybe a wall unit like motels have. Good luck. I live in a double wide and there are no trees around. Our electric bill is insane in the summer time.

  12. #12
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Emmitsburg, MD
    Posts
    1,624
    Honestly I move downstairs in the summer.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    52
    we have a big fan ( exhaust fan) in the attic...amazing how it keeps to upstairs tolerable.......
    we are blessed to have AC throughout the house also...sometimes I do not put it on...save some energy...just to keep my sewing place cool when it is not needed throughout the entire house

  14. #14
    Senior Member darlin121's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Smiths Station,Alabama
    Posts
    852
    I live in Alabama where it gets really hot. This answer seems like the right one. It shouldn't cost alot and should take care of the heat build-up in your room.

    Quote Originally Posted by ruck9085
    Me, I use a small window unit. We have the side by side windows, too, but DH opened one of the windows, set the unit in the window, then places plywood over the rest of the opening and used insulation to block any cracks. The unit works really well. I turn it on about thirty minutes before I start and by the time I go in, the room is comfortably cool. Give it shot. Oh, and the small unit only raised our light bill by about twenty bucks, well worth it, if you ask me.

  15. #15
    Super Member jdiane318's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    springfield, MO
    Posts
    2,456
    We had a picture window that just let in way too much light which meant there was heat. We had the windows tinted and it helped drop the temp down a lot. It was pretty inexpensive and you can do it yourself. It doesn't stop or distort the sunlight, but it does help with the heat.

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    54
    A big outside shade/awning may also help if your window gets a lot of sun, especially the afternoon sun. That would cut down on bills from the air conditioner!

    When we lived in a house where the afternoon sun hit our west windows, we also planted trees that would grow quickly--and before you knew it, they provided much needed shade for our house.

    Hope all these suggestions help. :-)

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    3,246
    Talk with local utility company. They should be able to give you the best options. Something to shade the windows either outside like trees or awnings, inside light filtering shades. I know Levelor have shades that reflect the heat.

  18. #18
    Super Member ontheriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Selma Alabama
    Posts
    3,670
    Lived in the south most of my life, so am used to it. I just use extra fan in the top of my window since it opens up from bottom or down from top.

  19. #19
    Super Member Quiltforme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Beautiful Washington state!
    Posts
    3,341
    The portable ones at Costco are perfect to use. they may help alot better than the window ones.

  20. #20
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    15,696
    Blog Entries
    2
    I can't believe it gets to 100 in your room, I work in the basement in Colorado. we only have a swamp cooler and it gets hot in my small room with the lights on and the iron. i use a small fan to help move the air. no window either.
    no ideas for you, sorry. good luck.

  21. #21
    Senior Member ncredbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Greeneville, TN
    Posts
    827
    Having a window installed for a window unit or simply having the unit exit through the wall would be your best bet. Do you have a corner room with 2 outside walls? It would help to have some plantings to shade your outside walls. Maybe a vine of some type that would grow up and shade the walls. I would think that you could have the a foam type insulation injected into the outside wall without a huge expense. Also more insulation in the attic would help and a whole attic fan. Installing any of the insulation or attic fan is going to help with the overall expense of heating/cooling your home. Your local energy company probably has a program to do a free home analysis and will offer the most cost effective solution for your home. Check with them and see. Ann in TN

  22. #22
    Super Member jansquiltn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    King George Virginia
    Posts
    1,199
    We always close the basement vents in the summer open the middle floor half way and open the top floor vents wide open. A fan in the attic that is automatic and comes on when the attic reaches 80 degrees works well also. Good luck.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Lincoln. MI
    Posts
    492
    Blog Entries
    1
    There is a new air conditioning unit out - called a "mini-split" I believe. They are very small (about 1.5 feet long and only about 6 inches high). A friend had one installed in his attic office recently and it is awesome. It is installed on the wall, and has a very small vent tube that runs outside. Not sure of the exact price, but he said it was under $1,200. We are considering two of them for our cottage in Michigan.....

  24. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    100
    What type of lights bulbs are you using? Some generate more heat than others.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Roxanne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    West Columbia, S.C.
    Posts
    686
    They make a portable air conditioning unit that sits on the floor. I'm not sure of a model name, but I think I saw one recently at Lowe's or Home Depot.

    I don't have an upstairs room, but my room is on the southside of the house. I move my little sewing table and machine to the family room in the hottest part of the summer.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.