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Thread: need Help with pre cut appliques.

  1. #1
    Senior Member CMARAS1234's Avatar
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    need Help with pre cut appliques.

    I have purchased some SBS cutouts from Ebay with no fusible on backs.What kind of glue on the backs works best before blanket stitch all around.I tried one spray and it showed on the front.any Help will be much appreciated Cmaras1234
    "I do not understand ,how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to" ( and mine is my summer houseboat on a beautiful KY lake.) quote by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings.

  2. #2
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    I would think that you can put an iron on fusible on the back of the applique pieces by using your applique pressing mat. Trace around the pieces and cut them out and iron them on. You might need to trim a bit before adhering them to your foundation fabric.

  3. #3
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    Patsy Thompson uses a product called Liquid Stitch for putting on the edge of an appliqué. I think it was her large pansy appliqué on her website? It is a tube of liquid adhesive that you should be able to find at Walmart in the fabric aisle. It is a permanent clear drying adhesive.

  4. #4
    Super Member Doggramma's Avatar
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    You might try a glue stick. It would hold it on enough, I think, for stitching around it.
    Lori

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  5. #5
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    I think using iron infusible would work the best because it would help keep the fabric from unraveling.
    Sue

  6. #6
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    i'd go with wonder under or heat and bond.
    put off till tomorrow what you can do today, and if you procrastinate long enough, you may never have to do it.

  7. #7
    Super Member tesspug's Avatar
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    I have a fabric glue stick that works well. but I have also just used washable school glue. Just use tiny dots so you don't get a blob. If I get a blob I just rub it off with my finger.
    I promise not to buy any more fabric until I see something I really like. Or it's on sale. Or I think it might match something.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would add fusible to the back. My choice would be Misty Fuse. To use, place Misty Fuse on top of a sheet of parchment paper, place your fusible shapes on top (right side facing up), place another sheet of parchment paper on top, then iron over the parchment paper. Let cool just a little (still want the fusible slightly warm), then carefully peel off the parchment paper from the top, turn over and peel the parchment paper from the bottom. Use scissors to trim around the shapes. Lightly fuse the shapes to your background fabric before sewing.

    You could also do this with a one-sided or paper-backed fusible, but I would be sure to use something as lightweight as possible so the applique shape does not become too stiff.

    Edit: You could also simply place tiny dots of Elmer's white washable school glue on the backs of the appliques, spread around a little with your finger, then iron in place. The glue will wash out later and not show at all. However, if this is a wall hanging that won't be washed, this method might not work if the glue shows through.

    Edit 2: What kind of spray did you use? 505 is a good basting spray that will wash out later. You need only a light spray (spray inside a box to avoid sticky stuff everywhere) and that should not show through the fabric. Apply the applique to the background fabric while the 505 is still sticky, and do not sew until it is completely dry (you can iron it dry to speed things up).
    Last edited by Prism99; 12-16-2015 at 12:29 PM.

  9. #9
    Member duckie's Avatar
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    Help! Different topic, but one using freezer paper and applique: I accidentally left in some freezer paper in a finished applique baby quilt. I washed it, no change. What would you do? Start over? Or leave it in - parts of the quilt "crinkle" just like what's in some baby toys.
    thank you for your help!
    And

  10. #10
    RST
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    Duckie -- re. your freezer paper issue -- is it all backed, quilted, and bound? IF so, I would call it a feature and carry on. If you still can access the back (ie, it's not layered and quilted) then you can carefully cut away some of the backing fabric and use tweezers to extract your freezer paper. I often trim backing away from all of the applique to reduce bulk and give a uniform appearance when the backing might show through the applique. I have some clever little scissors with bent tips that make it easier to do that trimming work without accidentally cutting into the applique. Hope that gives you some ideas how to proceed with your freezer paper crinkles.

  11. #11
    RST
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    CMaras -- I have a thread called new to accuquilt which addresses the same issue -- how to deal with precut appliques that don't currently have any adhesion on them. There are several helpful suggestions in that thread that might apply to your process.

  12. #12
    Member duckie's Avatar
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    Thank you for your reply. Yes, it is backed (minke), a little quilting, and bound. I started another applique monkey (there are three) then thought I would seek this talented, experienced board's input. I
    couldn't find any info online. I think I'll send it with "a feature"- love your term!

  13. #13
    Super Member jmoore's Avatar
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    I would iron them all onto a piece of lightweight heat bond or wonder under then cut them out as you need them...
    attitude is everything...the rest will fall into place.

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    Re SBS.....I have one too and am planning to use a lite weight non woven fusible interfacing.....sewing it onto a rough cut piece of fusible right sides facing, using 3/8"seam allowance...or very scant 1/4",cut fusible same shape as fabric piece .....believe me easier to do after sewn onto it, cut slit into center of fusible,flip out and with invisible thread tiny zigzag onto background... But, with each completed work layer...hand, arm, body.....cut out excess from back.......build from top layer to bottom layer.....not hard but time consuming....just the way I do it.....

  15. #15
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    I would add a fusible web to back. I lay them out as close as possible, cover with fusible and iron. I use a brown grocery bag or a piece from a used fusible under them on my ironing board - it pulls right off if done right after ironing. You could use a special sheet, but I always have these available!

  16. #16
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    I would be careful and use some Heat n Bond light. Can be found at JAF.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  17. #17
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    I would use a small flat paintbrush and good old Elmer's. Brush toward the edge gently so you don't cause fraying. The glue can even act as a stabilizer for the zig zagging. It does wash out completely in one wash. After gluing, allow to dry, then do a straight stitch all the way around, then zig zag. Straight stitching gives a nice but slightly puffed look to the zig zag.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  18. #18
    Super Member psychonurse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMARAS1234 View Post
    I have purchased some SBS cutouts from Ebay with no fusible on backs.What kind of glue on the backs works best before blanket stitch all around.I tried one spray and it showed on the front.any Help will be much appreciated Cmaras1234

    I detest SBS so I would use disappearing spray. LOL

  19. #19
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    What does SBS mean?

  20. #20
    Super Member Bree123's Avatar
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    I really love Glue-BasteIt by Roxanne. I get the EZ Squeezie bottle & it makes a perfect skinny line (or tiny dots) of glue every time. I've never had issues with it showing after it dries as long as I use cotton fabric. I've also used washable glue sticks (white, not purple -- though some people swear by the purple ones).

    I think the Glue BasteIt would be the quickest secure route to go for machine stitching, but you could also just do a fusible. Instead of cutting everything in advance, here's what I'd do:
    1) Iron Parchment Paper to my ironing board (or pin junk fabric to your board to protect it)
    2) Place WonderUnder paper side down
    3) Lay pre-cuts wrong side down on top of the WonderUnder
    4) Place a Pressing Sheet or some parchment paper gently on top of the pre-cuts & tack together with an iron as per manufacturer's instructions
    5) Peel off the Parchment Paper & cut out the fused fabric + fusible units
    6) Peel off paper backing & fuse to your background fabric

    The only time I wouldn't do that shortcut method is if you are using larger pre-cuts (3"+ wide and long) that would benefit from being windowed (cut the center out of the fusible, leaving only a generous 1/4" of fusible to press to inside edge of pre-cut). Windowing makes the finished product softer & gives it a better drape, especially with larger applique pieces. Nevertheless, I've done applique without windowing -- before I knew better -- and it still was a snuggly little baby quilt. You will save quite a bit of time if you don't have to window.

  21. #21
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    I have been doing much appliqué lately using laser cut pieces that are fusible. Although I follow the instructions, I often have pieces that come unstuck before I get them stitched down. I keep a fabric glue stick by my machine. The glue holds the pieces in place and I cannot tell, when sewing, which pieces were ironed down and which were glued.

  22. #22
    Super Member just_the_scraps_m'am's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madamekelly View Post
    I would use a small flat paintbrush and good old Elmer's. Brush toward the edge gently so you don't cause fraying. The glue can even act as a stabilizer for the zig zagging. It does wash out completely in one wash. After gluing, allow to dry, then do a straight stitch all the way around, then zig zag. Straight stitching gives a nice but slightly puffed look to the zig zag.
    interesting tip, never heard that one before, think i will try that! thanks!
    "variety is the spice of life"

  23. #23
    Super Member just_the_scraps_m'am's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by franc36 View Post
    I have been doing much appliqué lately using laser cut pieces that are fusible. Although I follow the instructions, I often have pieces that come unstuck before I get them stitched down. I keep a fabric glue stick by my machine. The glue holds the pieces in place and I cannot tell, when sewing, which pieces were ironed down and which were glued.
    so the glue never never oozes out & always washes out -- no telltale signs?
    "variety is the spice of life"

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