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Thread: Need help!!!!

  1. #26
    Super Member catmcclure's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karenpatrick
    My goddaughter and her dh are expecting their first child and they are GREEN. I've been online looking for organic quilting fabric with no luck. There are no juvenile prints and the prices are out of this world (and my pocketbook). Anybody got any ideas? I plan on using bamboo batting. The shower is in June. Help me.
    Green doesn't just mean using "organic" products. It also means to reuse, repurpose and save things from the past without using new items. So, using 100% cotton fabric from used clothing would also be "Green".

  2. #27
    Junior Member sew_sew's Avatar
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    If they are going green with the baby, will they use cloth diapers. Much available for babies is not available "green", but I have seen organic cotton batting.

  3. #28
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    Isn't cotton GREEN?

  4. #29
    okiepastor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeanneb52
    Isn't cotton GREEN?
    Cotton is ordinarily grown with TONS of pesticides (think boll weevil, etc.).
    I once fed cotton seeds to my goats, and had some customers--and my daughter--- react badly to the milk. Thank heavens not all my goats had freshened, so only a few were "contaminated" by the cottonseed feed!Those had their milk dumped for months....
    I agree--the GREEN solution is to re-use and re-purpose--so I would re-cycle fabrics.

  5. #30
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    I don't have a clue about this, but a little more than a yard shouldn't set you back too far. Personally, I would think something that was made outof 100 % cotton should be green enough.

  6. #31
    nawnee_00's Avatar
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    My definition of going green is the old standard, reduce, recycle, reuse. I vote for recycled relative's clothing especially grandparents that may live out of town. Then they can hug baby every time they cover the little one up in it even though they may not be there in person. Warm fuzzies for both ends of the deal.

  7. #32
    nawnee_00's Avatar
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    My definition of going green is the old standard, reduce, recycle, reuse. I vote for recycled relative's clothing especially grandparents that may live out of town. Then they can hug baby every time they cover the little one up in it even though they may not be there in person. Warm fuzzies for both ends of the deal.

  8. #33
    nawnee_00's Avatar
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    didn't mean to double post. oops........

  9. #34
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Be sure to research your bamboo batting. I've read that we're being told bamboo batting is better when in fact it takes more chemicals to make it soft than cotton does.

  10. #35

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    Cotton is organic, natural, whatever!

  11. #36
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Cotton is natural but unless it's grown organically, it's not organic. I think there's a difference between just being "green" (recycling, using natural materials, etc) and being "organic" (using things grown and made without chemicals).

  12. #37
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    Being green is also about repurposing items that have been around awhile. Think about thrift shops and resale shops for good quality clothing to deconstruct for the fabrics.

  13. #38
    KLO
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    Quote Originally Posted by seamstome
    Buy some regular fabric and call it organic. The baby wont know the difference.
    Boy, isn't this the truth. Just make sure the fabric has been washed and also the quilt after it is made.

  14. #39
    Senior Member haylillan's Avatar
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    well if bamboo batting is green wouldn't cotton fabric be green?

  15. #40
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the input, everyone. I must admit I sort of got carried away there for a while. I just found out that day that my goddaughter was pregnant and got so excited I lost my head for a second. I don't usually pre-wash my fabric before making a quilt but will in this instance and use an organic receiving blanket for batting and it should be fine. Again, thanks for all the common sense advice when I seemed to have lost my common sense for a while.

  16. #41
    Senior Member Jo Belmont's Avatar
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    Perhaps I'm being especially dense here, but it seems to me that cotton, being a natural product, once washed enough to free it of any sizing, chemicals, herbicides, etc., would be considered "organic" or "green" or whichever term under which it would fall. Fact is, there's nothing left but pure cotton.

    EXCEPT - what about dyes? Unless done with tea, beets, etc., would they not be considered other-than truly organic? Aren't most dyes from some kind of chemical process?

    If green is recycling, then I would suggest the most totally pure way is to give a product of completely washed and rewashed UNbleached (bleach is a chemical) muslin.

    Perhaps where this is going is absolutely nowhere and while you are to be blessed for being so considerate of their preferences, you might be better off to ask them before investing money, time and emotion only to find that your gift did not measure up to their standards.

    I appreciate caring for our earth, recycling, etc., but IMNSHO, it sometimes gets carried to the point of pure silliness. Yet, to each his own. Why don't you just ask them?

  17. #42
    Junior Member LogCabinLady's Avatar
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    I totally agree with this statement. Recycling fabric pieces (scrappy quilt) would be considered green in my book.

    Quote Originally Posted by mommamac
    does it have to be organic? If you recycle some clothes would that be considered 'green'? Maybe you could get some of mom's tops & dad's shirts.

  18. #43
    Junior Member shelrox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karenpatrick
    My goddaughter and her dh are expecting their first child and they are GREEN. I've been online looking for organic quilting fabric with no luck. There are no juvenile prints and the prices are out of this world (and my pocketbook). Anybody got any ideas? I plan on using bamboo batting. The shower is in June. Help me.
    There was an article recently about bamboo vs cotton and I cant find it. Bamboo is not as green as everyone seems to think it is. Yes it is a quick growing source of fiber but it takes more to process then cotton does resulting in more pollutants in the environment. Have you considered even Alpaca fibers? they are a great source of "green" fibers and make a beautiful cloth. There is also a newer batting out called Quilters Dream Green that is made in part from recycled soda pop bottles, very soft and very nice to work with, hand or machine.

  19. #44
    Super Member G'ma Kay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seamstome
    Buy some regular fabric and call it organic. The baby wont know the difference.
    Doesn't organic mean grown in dirt? Isn't all cotton grown in dirt?

  20. #45
    okiepastor's Avatar
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    Doesn't organic mean grown in dirt? Isn't all cotton grown in dirt?[/quote]

    Organic means no chemicals, pesticides,etc.

  21. #46
    Senior Member Tudey's Avatar
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    What about recycling shirts or nightgowns, etc that are 100% cotton---that's pretty "green"

  22. #47

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't 100% cotton material organic?

  23. #48
    Senior Member Gabrielle's Mimi's Avatar
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    If all else fails, go to Buy Buy Baby and purchase a couple of flannel receiving blankets from their Green products line and make the quilt from them.

  24. #49
    okiepastor's Avatar
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    100% cotton would be grown with all the pesticides, chemicals, etc.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by seamstome
    Buy some regular fabric and call it organic. The baby wont know the difference.
    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

    My sentiments also....and if you use the bamboo batting it's going to be blended with cotton anyway.,.., just tell them it's bamboo...not fibbing...

    yes, the baby won't know the difference.

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