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Need Paper Piecing Help

Need Paper Piecing Help

Old 07-10-2020, 09:02 AM
  #11  
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I sympathize with you on getting everything reversed. I have tried this method and my brain just doesn't work the way it is supposed to in working backwards. Good luck to you and I know that PP is so precise and beautifully finished. Hopefully you will get your quilt finished and be happy with it.
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Old 07-10-2020, 10:35 AM
  #12  
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I have not tried PP piecing not really interested in learning it.

Good luck to everyone that wants to learn it.
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Old 07-11-2020, 03:11 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
Carol Doak is the ( Go to) instructor I usually send people to who want to learn the process. She shows you how to measure and cut your pieces and walks you through step ny step to wonderful designs. After learning with her it is one of my very favorite techniques.
I allways tell anyone that wants to learn paperpiecing to get her (Carol Doak) book, "Show Me How to Paper Piece" That's how I learned and have been a fan of hers for a long time. She has a bunch of other books too with a lot of neat patterns.
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Old 07-11-2020, 03:31 AM
  #14  
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If I can, I PP anything with points or is fussy. The way I do it so as to not waste lots of fabric, is make a template. If the pattern is not from Electric Quilt but a purchased pattern I take a copy of the pattern then cut out the individual pieces. From here, I can copy the piece on a fresh piece of paper then with a ruler add 3/8" or 1/2" all around. I have found that this usually gives me more than enough wiggle room. If the piece is square or rectangular I tend to go to the smaller number. The only thing you need to consider (and this goes for all paper piecing) is which side of the template is the right side as some triangles are not "reversible"
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Old 07-13-2020, 02:33 PM
  #15  
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I always read this before I paper piece, and it makes it work for me easily:
http://weallsew.com/how-to-make-paper-piecing-easy/
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Old 07-13-2020, 04:46 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by eparys View Post
If I can, I PP anything with points or is fussy. The way I do it so as to not waste lots of fabric, is make a template. If the pattern is not from Electric Quilt but a purchased pattern I take a copy of the pattern then cut out the individual pieces. From here, I can copy the piece on a fresh piece of paper then with a ruler add 3/8" or 1/2" all around. I have found that this usually gives me more than enough wiggle room. If the piece is square or rectangular I tend to go to the smaller number. The only thing you need to consider (and this goes for all paper piecing) is which side of the template is the right side as some triangles are not "reversible"
This is my method too. I will copy it into EQ8 if necessary to make templates. Put them on the *back* of the fabric. There's very little waste this way.

If there are a lot of long skinny pieces, I'll cut strips instead.
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Old 07-13-2020, 07:43 PM
  #17  
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I have loved PP for a while now ... at first I had a hard time with the wasted fabric also ... but soon learned that a little wasted fabric was better than hours of unpicking something that wasn't quite right. I love the look, precise points, and the beautiful ending! Take a deep breath and give it another try!
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Old 07-14-2020, 03:23 AM
  #18  
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I use the fold back method of PP because I don't like tearing off the paper, When folded back, one can place the fabric behind the fold back and look through it to make sure the fabric will cover. I don't pre-cut any chunks. I work with scraps and just cut off the piece after it is sewn on. i often cut many pieces off the same scrap. I'm not sure if I explained this well, but there is very little fabric waste this way. And I use the same paper pattern several times before it wears out.
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Old 07-14-2020, 04:01 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by carol45 View Post
I always read this before I paper piece, and it makes it work for me easily:
http://weallsew.com/how-to-make-paper-piecing-easy/
Great link. thank you.
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Old 07-14-2020, 06:11 AM
  #20  
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Another thing you can do to make sure that your fabric piece will cover the area it's supposed to -- pin it along the seam line and fold it over as if you'd just sewn it. Hold it up to the light and make sure that you have sufficient seam allowance on all sides. If you've used templates to cut your pieces, you should. Sometimes you'll see that you need to adjust it a bit.

ETA: don't be too obsessed with that 1/4 inch seam allowance. If it's a bit too small or a bit too big, who cares? The Quilt Police are not going to break down your door and inspect it.

Last edited by IceLeopard; 07-14-2020 at 06:15 AM.
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