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Thread: New method of free-motion quilting?

  1. #1
    Member newbie1001's Avatar
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    Hi, I'm relatively new to quilting and the forum. So far I've only made a couple of baby size quilts. My biggest problem is the free motion quilting. I sew on a Janome DC 2010 and the throat is only 5.5" or so. I've been reading on this forum and other places on the internet that most people seem to roll up or crumple up their quilts in order to fit them into the throat. Even though I'm working with small quilts, I find it really uncomfortable, it seems like my right arm and hand always have to make an effort to go around that bulk and get a good grip on the right side of my work. A friend of mine gave me her Flynn frame to try out. I didn't like that thing, but it gave me an idea. When free motion, why not turn the machine 90 degree so that the throat is behind the needle (just like you do using that frame)? I've just tried it out and it works so much better for me! Seems like the only rolled up part will always be behind the needle towards the throat, the sides will always be free! Does anyone quilt like this or can think of a reason not to get into the habit of doing this?

    Would appreciate your input. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Pam
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    Super Member Pam's Avatar
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    If it works for you, do it! Having quilted a large queen size on my trusty, old Bernina I really appreciate anything that makes it easier. I have found though that using bicycle clips does not work if they are the type covered in rubber. The rubber sticks to the bed of your machine and table top, making a difficult job even harder.

    Another tip, instead of crumpling your quilt up to fit in the throat of your machine, roll it up. It makes it more compact and easier to go through the limited space.

  3. #3
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    That's an interesting idea.
    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Lisa's Avatar
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    Sounds like something worth trying to me. I have a Flynn frame but I have never used it, what about didn't you care for?

  5. #5
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    very interesting, please let us know how you come out

  6. #6
    Member newbie1001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa
    Sounds like something worth trying to me. I have a Flynn frame but I have never used it, what about didn't you care for?
    Because most of the frame is between you and your work, you are farther away from the needle, which makes it more difficult for me to see exactly what I'm doing. Maybe that's my eyes and not the frame? Another thing that bothered me was that you cannot just turn your work around to see how the bottom looks, you would have to cut your thread and take the frame out in order to do that. My friend loves it, it just isn't for me. Or maybe I should try a couple more times. But for now I'll see how far the other method gets me.

  7. #7
    Super Member knlsmith's Avatar
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    nope, no reason to not do it. Also spend $6 and get some machine quilting gloves. Believvvveeee me they are worth $1000.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by knlsmith
    Also spend $6 and get some machine quilting gloves. Believvvveeee me they are worth $1000.
    Ain't that the truth?

  9. #9
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I have heard of people doing that and loving it. If it works for you go right ahead. No quilting police here.

  10. #10
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    I saw a you-tube video of a lady that turns the machine 90 degrees to quilt. I keep meaning to try it but forget. I agree -- you just need to try different things and find what works for you :)

    I got a Flynn Frame awhile back -- It definitely helped me get started in free motion quilting but I quickly found the quilting area to be too restrictive. It helped me realize that many of my quilting problems were related to basting. I've finally made the just to FMQ without it.

    I'll have to try out the gloves. I know people who love the Quilting Halo -- I personally didn't like it. I do use the FreeMotionSlider tho and like it.

  11. #11
    Super Member Rachelcb80's Avatar
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    I've actually seen a sewing table that has the machine sitting in it like you just described, turned 90 degrees. I say if it works for you, go for it!

  12. #12
    Super Member nursie76's Avatar
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    I just tried a handi-quilter at the quilt show that was mounted in a sit down table just as you described. I also tried out a Flynn frame and now am the proud owner of one. I found it worked well for me. You are supposed to be able to purchase relatively cheaply, conduit at the hardware store to extend the frame to use for up to a queen quilt. I can hardly wait to get it set up and try it here at home.

    I do like your idea however, how clever.

  13. #13
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    when I start quilting bigger quilts, I will have to try it out, I have a 9 inch throat on mine. Penny

  14. #14
    Member newbie1001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rachelcb80
    I've actually seen a sewing table that has the machine sitting in it like you just described, turned 90 degrees. I say if it works for you, go for it!
    I just had my husband make a cutout for my machine in my big sewing table. If this 90 degree turn turns out to be the solution for me, he'll have to make a second one!

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    i can't do that with my machine inside my sewing table.the cut out is not long or wide enough to turn the machine.
    but my juki on the frame is that way, so i think it would be a great idea.

  16. #16
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    Most excellent idea.. to turn the machine.. bravo!!

  17. #17
    Junior Member hawghugger's Avatar
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    Great idea. I have the flynn frame and I love it. I now have extensions for the frame to go up to a king size. With my extra conduit I can quilt all sizes now. It makes quilting fun and I always look forward to my next quilting job.

  18. #18
    Super Member nursie76's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawghugger
    Great idea. I have the flynn frame and I love it. I now have extensions for the frame to go up to a king size. With my extra conduit I can quilt all sizes now. It makes quilting fun and I always look forward to my next quilting job.
    I am glad to hear that you like your Flynn frame. What is the largest you have quilted so far? I can hardly wait to get mine set up so I can try it out. My hubby just got 2 huge wooden library tables that work was throwing away, and I think those with the Flynn would be a great set up. Would love to hear more about your experiences with the Flynn frame as you explore all the possibilities.

  19. #19
    Senior Member GrammaNancy's Avatar
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    What a great idea...I also have a Janome 2010 and have been trying to free motion quilt. Nancy

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by nursie76
    Quote Originally Posted by hawghugger
    Great idea. I have the flynn frame and I love it. I now have extensions for the frame to go up to a king size. With my extra conduit I can quilt all sizes now. It makes quilting fun and I always look forward to my next quilting job.
    I am glad to hear that you like your Flynn frame. What is the largest you have quilted so far? I can hardly wait to get mine set up so I can try it out. My hubby just got 2 huge wooden library tables that work was throwing away, and I think those with the Flynn would be a great set up. Would love to hear more about your experiences with the Flynn frame as you explore all the possibilities.
    i would like to hear more, also.

  21. #21
    Member newbie1001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrammaNancy
    What a great idea...I also have a Janome 2010 and have been trying to free motion quilt. Nancy
    This is the first time I see someone mention this machine on the forum. I got mine in January and have searched it a couple of times since then, but nothing ever came up. How do you like yours? I don't really have a comparison, but so far it seems to be doing a good job. I do applique, and people have been commenting on the nice satin stitch it does.

  22. #22
    Senior Member countrymaid's Avatar
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    I got my DC2010 last summer and love it. I'm not very good with controling my speed. I have issues with my right ankle and really like the adjustable speed. I haven't done a lot of sewing lately but love the smooth action of this machine.

  23. #23
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    You know that does sound like a great idea but for the few of us that use a large cabinet or a treadle its impossible to do.

    The way I was taught by my dear friend was to take your quilt and make it up into a pile of mashed taters and hollow out your work area and quilt that and when you move to a different area you just rearrange the tater pile to the next spot. She does hers on a Singer 15 mounted in a bench similar to mine.

    I can tell you this, all of her quilts win all of the awards and it looks like she sent them to a long armer. Perfection is an understatement for this wonderful lady!!!!

    Billy

  24. #24
    Super Member LoisN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newbie1001
    Hi, I'm relatively new to quilting and the forum. So far I've only made a couple of baby size quilts. My biggest problem is the free motion quilting. I sew on a Janome DC 2010 and the throat is only 5.5" or so. I've been reading on this forum and other places on the internet that most people seem to roll up or crumple up their quilts in order to fit them into the throat. Even though I'm working with small quilts, I find it really uncomfortable, it seems like my right arm and hand always have to make an effort to go around that bulk and get a good grip on the right side of my work. A friend of mine gave me her Flynn frame to try out. I didn't like that thing, but it gave me an idea. When free motion, why not turn the machine 90 degree so that the throat is behind the needle (just like you do using that frame)? I've just tried it out and it works so much better for me! Seems like the only rolled up part will always be behind the needle towards the throat, the sides will always be free! Does anyone quilt like this or can think of a reason not to get into the habit of doing this?

    Would appreciate your input. Thanks!
    I may try your method of turning my machine, but I'm going to have to figure out how to do that because my machine is down in the cabinet that my DH built for me. If I turn it, I'd need to move it to another table????? Anyway, I have a DC 2010 also and have quilted 2 queen-size quilts on it. I have found that if I keep my right hand on the quilt and the bulk of the "roll" under the throat is positioned on top of my hand, I have more room to maneuver the quilt. Does this make any sense?

  25. #25
    Super Member nursie76's Avatar
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    have found that if I keep my right hand on the quilt and the bulk of the "roll" under the throat is positioned on top of my hand, I have more room to maneuver the quilt. Does this make any sense?
    Actually it goes, you still have more maneuverability, your hand wouldn't keep bumping up against the roll. :thumbup:

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