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Thread: No Melt Mylar for Applique

  1. #1
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    No Melt Mylar for Applique

    Hello everyone!

    I have wanted to try using no-melt mylar for applique templates, instead of freezer paper. Both methods would still use starch, and then press over the seam allowance. I have had some difficulty with the freezer paper curling over on the edges of curves when ironed (2 layers of paper) and not making a crisp fabric shape, plus I like the firmness of the mylar (the melting kind?) I've used on other projects.

    Does anyone have any experience and advice on using the no-melt mylar this way? What do you like or dislike about this method?

    If you like this method, do you have a preferred brand of the no-melt mylar? The mylar I've seen so far seems to be very pricey, especially for making large scale patterns, so I might get priced out for larger shapes.

    Thanks for any and all advice!

  2. #2
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Sorry, I've never heard of no-melt mylar.

    When I use my iron to make appliques, I prefer Templar template plastic. It's heat resistant.

  3. #3
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I too have always used Templar Template plastic. I purchase it in large sheets, it’s not very expensive and is heat resistant. I didn’t know there was a no- melt Mylar. But the Mylar I’ve seen was much more expensive than template plastic.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  4. #4
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    ditto what they said. I was a starch and press applique madwoman, love the technique. I did small-ish pieces so could get a lot out of a sheet. It probably isn't cost effective for large pieces.
    I've used manila folder for big pieces. Perfect for one you will only use a few times

    Fot both methods I have a tiny stapler with fine staples, and I'd use one staple in the center of the fabric/template.
    And a staple puller to get it back out. I prefer the pencil shaped one rather than the jaw one.

    be sure to turn off the steam option on iron when using this technique.
    I like all steps of quilting, but can understand why some don't like the time it takes to do this style of applique.
    On the other hand when you get to the sewing it goes like the wind. Hand or machine.
    Last edited by KalamaQuilts; 09-09-2018 at 04:02 AM.

  5. #5
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Have you tried doubling up the freezer paper? That helps some as well. In fact I have done it with up to 3 layers. I iron the layers together before cutting my shape.

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    Thanks for the advice! I must admit I was thinking mylar and plastic was the same thing. I didn't realize that there was a separate plastic template material at all.

    I will try the three layer freezer paper, as well. I really have no common sense in quilting at all! I was tracing two separate templates on freezer paper, cutting both out separately, and then ironing them together, so of course there were probably small differences that weakened the finished product! However, thanks to all the very kind advice on QB, I will keep at it! (Slow, but determined!)

    I will also be ordering the Templar template plastic this week! I have high hopes for this, as I really like the stiffness and endless re-usability.

    Here's to conquering applique one tiny stitch at a time!

  7. #7
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I tried the multi-layer freezer paper method. Hats off to those who make it work, I got frustrated because it would get soggy after a few uses and I'd have to make another template. The Templar lasts a lot longer.

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    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    If you can get hold of old X-ray film it is great. I use it all the time

  10. #10
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    with a hot iron? I had some but it was a disaster for me. Maybe it is different material now, mine were back in the early 90's.
    I wonder what people would have thought knowing I had their x-rays.

  11. #11
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    I have used no-melt mylar for circles for applique, but I have found that for odd-shaped pieces, it doesn't work as well. I have used a large basting stitch, (leaving a couple of inches of thread at the ends),place the mo melt mylar in position, then pulled the strings to shape around the plastic, and iron on the right side of the fabric. When I do this, I leave the plastic in, until ready to apply to the piece to the background fabric

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