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Thread: Other uses for embroidery thread?

  1. #1
    Super Member Baloonatic's Avatar
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    I was just given a couple dozen partial spools of machine embroidery thread. As I don't have an embroidery machine, is there anything else I might use these for? Is it strong enough for piecing or perhaps machine quilting?

  2. #2
    Senior Member kraftykimberly's Avatar
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    I sometimes use it for bobbin thread, dont know if thats a big no no, but I've had no problems doing that so far.

  3. #3
    Super Member athomenow's Avatar
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    I'm interested in the answer to this because I have many spools of embroidery thread that I was going to sell. If I can use it for something else that would be good.

  4. #4
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    I've used it with machine applique.

  5. #5
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    I use embroidery thread to stitch around applique.

  6. #6
    Member pamelainsa's Avatar
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    I use it to machine quilt with.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    I know that Isacord will quilt beautifully, so other brands will probably work as well.

  8. #8
    Senior Member neeng's Avatar
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    I machine quilted with mine.

  9. #9
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    Would it work to do fm embroidery?

  10. #10
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    I use the polyester embroidery thread to machine quilt with, too. (The rayon is prone to melt in the dryer, fade in the washer, become brittle, etc.)

    Some people don't like poly thread for quilting, so you might want to keep that in mind.

    For my own quilts, I figure that fifty years from now, if the seams and quilting lines are the last things left of any quilt that I make and all that's left of the rest of it are shreds and faded fibers, it won't make any the tiniest difference to anyone on earth. I pray to God that I won't care about it, either. ;)

  11. #11
    Super Member Baloonatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thepolyparrot
    I use the polyester embroidery thread to machine quilt with, too. (The rayon is prone to melt in the dryer, fade in the washer, become brittle, etc.)

    Some people don't like poly thread for quilting, so you might want to keep that in mind.

    For my own quilts, I figure that fifty years from now, if the seams and quilting lines are the last things left of any quilt that I make and all that's left of the rest of it are shreds and faded fibers, it won't make any the tiniest difference to anyone on earth. I pray to God that I won't care about it, either. ;)
    Thank you for the info. How can I tell if it's rayon or poly? The label doesn't seem to indicate which it is?

  12. #12
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    What does the label say? Is there a brand name? The rayon thread that I have is very shiny.

  13. #13
    Senior Member MoanaWahine's Avatar
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    Here is a thought, if the thread looks good together, get some of the clear glass ornaments that can be found in craft stores and fill them up with pieces of the thread. Then you could decorate a tree for the Holidays with them. I have seen this done but used the ends of thread that are clipped off of when you sew a seam together.

  14. #14
    Super Member twistedstitcher's Avatar
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    I've used it for machine applique and machine quilting.

  15. #15
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    I use isacord 40wt polyester which is sold for embroidery to do fmq on my Juki and in the bobbin. Never had a problem

  16. #16
    Super Member vickig626's Avatar
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    I've used it in a pinch for a specific color. And on simple quilting projects - not large quilts.

    Basically, it's usually silk, rayon, or polyester and 60 wt so you should be able to use it on whatever.

    I know one of the types can melt when ironed but can't remember which one so keep that in mind.

    I could be way off base but that's my thought.

  17. #17
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    You shouldn't use it for regular sewing. It's usually a silky type of thread that if it breaks, lots of stitches can come out.

    It works beautifully with machine applique. Gives the item you're satin stitching around that little extra pizazz.

  18. #18
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    do a tug test and see if it 's strong enough- if it does not break when you hold a piece between your two hands and give it a tug you can use it to piece- to do hand work- to quilt with- for what ever you want-
    if it does break it's probably not strong enough for basic sewing- donate it to a school art department, scout troop, 4-H'rs...kids are very creative with things like that.

  19. #19
    Super Member weezie's Avatar
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    I plan to use some of my polyester embroidery thread for hand applique. It is very strong, whereas my rayon ME thread breaks easily when I pull on it. I have 260 colors of the polyester, plenty for any applique I want to do.

  20. #20
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    Hi,

    I do machine embroidery, but I also use my emb. thread when I applique. It works great for blanket stitch and satin stitch, looks thicker and has a slight gloss to it.

    Bev

  21. #21
    Super Member nursie76's Avatar
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    I mostly use Isacord Poly for machine embroidery, but I met a lady at the quilt shop who uses for piecing also. I usually piece and quilt with Gutermann poly, so I suppose it wouldn't be a lot different.

  22. #22
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nursie76
    I mostly use Isacord Poly for machine embroidery, but I met a lady at the quilt shop who uses for piecing also. I usually piece and quilt with Gutermann poly, so I suppose it wouldn't be a lot different.
    I rarely do the type of dense quilting that Leah Day does, but I know she uses Isacord to free motion quilt.

  23. #23
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    If you have a serger, it is very good for decorative edges and flatlock embroidery.

  24. #24
    Member She In PA's Avatar
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    You can roll up a ball of the htread and do a burn test.
    •Polyester: Has a somewhat sweet chemical odor. The residue is initially a hard cream-colored bead that becomes darker. Flames gives off black smoke.
    •Cotton: Burns, but does not melt. It has the odor of burning paper,
    •leaves, or wood. The residue is a fine, feathery, gray ash.
    •Hemp: Same as cotton
    •Linen: Same as cotton
    •Ramie : Same as cotton
    •Rayon : Same as cotton
    •Silk: Burns, but does not melt. It shrinks from the flame. It has the odor of charred meat. The residue is a black, hollow irregular bead that can be easily to a gritty black powder. It is self-extinguishing, i.e., it burns itself out.
    •Wool, and other Protein Fibers: Burns, but does not melt. It shrinks from the flame. It has a strong odor of burning hair. The residue is a black, hollow irregular bead that can be easily crushed into a gritty black powder. It is self-extinguishing, i.e., it burns itself out.


    I remember doing burn test on fibers when I was in school for Marketing many many years ago.

  25. #25
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    I use my little bits left on the spools for top stitching.

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