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Thread: paper piecing question please help!

  1. #1
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    When you paper piece, are you supposed to put the fabric wrong side to wrong side of the paper? And stitch on the printed side of the paper?

    I don't quite get it. I'm making a mystery paper pieced 31 X 23 wall quilt and haven't paper pieced yet.

    Thanks!!

  2. #2
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    the fabric goes on the side of the paper without the printing and you stitch thru the paper on the side with the printing.

    the 1st piece of fabric that goes down is right side up and then all other fabric pieces are put right side down.

  3. #3
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    The first piece goes right side up on your part #1, on the wrong side of the paper. Make sure it extends at least 1/4" past the stitching line. No sewing yet. The second piece goes right sides together on top of #1 and sew on the line between one and two, on the marked side of the paper. Open and press and move on to the next number. Clear??

    Maria

  4. #4
    Super Member b.zang's Avatar
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    Try thinking of it this way---

    you sew on the printed side of the paper and when you turn the paper over with your fabric sewed to it, you are looking at the right side of your fabric

    kind of like a back-to-back thing

  5. #5
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-25541-1.htm

    Amma did this tute for me , I think it is wonderful , very clear and lots of pictures :lol: I had never PPd before , but needed to learn for a swap I was in :shock: LOL

  6. #6
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    Thank you sooooo much ladies! I think I understand it now. :D :D

  7. #7
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    Thanks so much for this wonderful help. I had been taught to put on top and maybe that is why I didn't like it much. Now maybe I can do a Dear Jane on machine.

  8. #8
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    some women at one of the guilds i go to put the fabric on top too and i found it extremely confusing to work that way.

  9. #9
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kluedesigns
    some women at one of the guilds i go to put the fabric on top too and i found it extremely confusing to work that way.
    I agree. I've done it both ways and I much prefer the fabric on the backside of the paper.

    If you are having issues with tearing the paper out afterwards, here is an easy trick. Before you add any fabric, sew along the lines of the paper with an unthreaded needle. This perforates the paper. Then sew the fabric on, as with any paper piecing. You'll find the paper comes out much easier, especially in those dratted corners. I now do this will all my paper piecing blocks and it takes a bit of extra prep time but is so worth it in the end!

  10. #10
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffany
    Quote Originally Posted by kluedesigns
    some women at one of the guilds i go to put the fabric on top too and i found it extremely confusing to work that way.
    I agree. I've done it both ways and I much prefer the fabric on the backside of the paper.

    If you are having issues with tearing the paper out afterwards, here is an easy trick. Before you add any fabric, sew along the lines of the paper with an unthreaded needle. This perforates the paper. Then sew the fabric on, as with any paper piecing. You'll find the paper comes out much easier, especially in those dratted corners. I now do this will all my paper piecing blocks and it takes a bit of extra prep time but is so worth it in the end!
    What a good hint! I recently discovered paper piecing with freezer paper. You do perforate the freezer paper but you do that so you can fold it back and stich right next to the paper instead of through it. The waxy coating on the paper sticks to your fabric just enough to stabalize it and comes off like a dream in one piece. You can then use the same pattern piece for multiple blocks. It's an awesome method. I wasn't sure I would like when I read through the instructions but once I tried it I really liked it. However with some of the PP patterns that have itsy bitsy teeny tiny pieces I think I will stick with traditional PP.

  11. #11
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Thank you Loretta :D:D:D

    I had never heard of sewing and placing the fabrics on the front, that would be awkward....

  12. #12
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic
    ...I recently discovered paper piecing with freezer paper. You do perforate the freezer paper but you do that so you can fold it back and stich right next to the paper instead of through it. The waxy coating on the paper sticks to your fabric just enough to stabalize it and comes off like a dream in one piece. You can then use the same pattern piece for multiple blocks. It's an awesome method. I wasn't sure I would like when I read through the instructions but once I tried it I really liked it. However with some of the PP patterns that have itsy bitsy teeny tiny pieces I think I will stick with traditional PP.
    I use this method for the easier patterns but I learned the hard way that it doesn't work well for me when making a complicated block. The points simply wouldn't come out right and I ended up redoing the block in the regular manner. It's wonderful for those easier blocks though...which reminds me, I've a table runner I'm making with that technique that is going to become a UFO if I don't get back to it sometime soon. :oops:

  13. #13
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    i agree that the freeze paper method has a limited function when paper piecing.

    i find it works best with things that don't need to be paper pieced to begin with - once the block is complex with small pieces and bias pieces the entire process falls apart.

  14. #14
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kluedesigns
    i agree that the freeze paper method has a limited function when paper piecing.

    i find it works best with things that don't need to be paper pieced to begin with - once the block is complex with small pieces and bias pieces the entire process falls apart.
    Try using it to make a Mariners Compass or NY Beauty.

    I have done split compasses (two colors on one ray of the compass) with surrounding circle of points like a NY Beauty. No way would I attempt either of these without paper piecing and the freezer paper method was what the author suggested and it worked great. Especially in the compass because you have to make 8 units to make a compass. And almost every piece is on the bias. So reusing the same pattern piece not only ensured all 8 pieces came out exactly the same but saved a great deal of time and effort. I don't agree that freezer paper piecing is limited to only using with blocks that don't need to be paper pieced. JMHO.

  15. #15
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    i'm not saying it isn't useful in some cases but i find it has limited use when working with 4 inch blocks that have pieces that are 1/4 finished.

  16. #16
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic
    Quote Originally Posted by kluedesigns
    i agree that the freeze paper method has a limited function when paper piecing.

    i find it works best with things that don't need to be paper pieced to begin with - once the block is complex with small pieces and bias pieces the entire process falls apart.
    Try using it to make a Mariners Compass or NY Beauty.

    I have done split compasses (two colors on one ray of the compass) with surrounding circle of points like a NY Beauty. No way would I attempt either of these without paper piecing and the freezer paper method was what the author suggested and it worked great. Especially in the compass because you have to make 8 units to make a compass. And almost every piece is on the bias. So reusing the same pattern piece not only ensured all 8 pieces came out exactly the same but saved a great deal of time and effort. I don't agree that freezer paper piecing is limited to only using with blocks that don't need to be paper pieced. JMHO.
    You sound like my girlfriend. She can use this method and have it mostly come out perfect no matter what the pattern. Me, if it has a lot of points, small pieces that come together in odd ways, and a lot of bias shapes, it won't work for me. I can't begin to tell you how frustrated I was and I find that the regular paper piecing method is the one I prefer for complicated PP blocks.

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