Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 46 of 46

Thread: Paper Piecing- When do YOU remove the paper?

  1. #26
    Senior Member kaelynangelfoot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    619
    I have tried to leave the paper until all the blocks are sew together and found that I had issues getting my seams to line up. I remove the paper when the block is completed and trimmed to the correct size, then starch and press. That is what seems to work for me, but I'm sure you'll have to experiment to find what works for you.

  2. #27
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,971
    Blog Entries
    8
    I also use Carol Doaks method too. I have found that the paper removal process is easier if I take the seam line paper out as I go along. I have never made a large quilt though. Just large wallhangings. I have been teaching Carols method for several years. My advice, leave paper in! The other thing I advise is to use PP paper. I figure if Im putting lots of effort, $$ for good fabric, a few more $$ for the best paper is not a deal breaker. Skip copy paper!

  3. #28
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    9,469
    Blog Entries
    31
    I remove the paper before I sew sections together. I have never had a problem with distortion. There are lots of bias edges in PP but pre- treating the fabrics with starch and handling gently solves these issues.

    When sewing seams on PP it is to hard to remove all the paper in intersections and has its own issues.

    I have found ignoring the 'rule' about leaving the paper on till done is just not necessary in most cases.

    peace
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  4. #29
    Super Member mjsylvstr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Spring Lake, NJ
    Posts
    2,440
    With some of my blocks when they are very tiny, I sometimes mark the seam line with a marking pencil, take off the outer paper and sew the seam. I take all remaining paper off when the entire block is completed.

  5. #30
    Super Member sew_Tracy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Standing in front of Walmart begging for fat quarters
    Posts
    1,056
    Blog Entries
    19
    You can reuse the freezer paper 5-6 times. I trace the pattern then press the freezer paper onto another freezer paper so it is thicker/sturdier, then I score the thicker papers with my sewing machine. When it starts to lose it's sticky, I add another piece of paper and score again.
    From the artist formerly known as Missus Fear...Hi, my name is Tracy and I am a hobbyaholic.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/blogs/m...ear-79671.html

  6. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    984
    IMHO The paper should never be removed until after the blocks are joined to their sashing or each other. My thoughts on this come from the fact that very often you are dealing with bias edges and I want to keep everything stable. Not to say sometimes if an edge seems stable I will tear it off just as I am getting ready to join that block just t keep the paper out of that last seam.

  7. #32
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    4
    I also wait until all seams are completed including the outer edge of the block. It keeps it accurate that way and nothing stretches out of place, plus you have the line to stitch along.

  8. #33
    Senior Member GammaLou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    519
    I find that the paper slides under my presser foot if I try and sew blocks together with the paper still attached, so I remove it after the block is finished, but before I sew the blocks together.

  9. #34
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Posts
    15,804
    Blog Entries
    3
    I take the paper off after each block or a few. I have purchased the foundation paper through MSQC and I like to use tissue paper from the gift wrapping sections in the stores. At craft stores you can buy large quantities and they usually come in 20"x20" sheets. Some range from 30-100 sheets. I also lightly score the paper and fold on the seam, It perforates the paper making it easier to tear off. My little niece comes over often and she likes to help so I save her some blocks. She'll say "I'm helping in the process, right? and I reply absolutely.

  10. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    25
    I remove the paper as I am piecing the block. I try and keep the grain lines correct with each piece . Bias edges do not bother me. The seams are not so bulky this way. Works for me.

  11. #36
    Senior Member katybob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    804
    Quote Originally Posted by nanna-up-north View Post
    Thanks everyone. It sounds like it's a personal choice. I guess I'll remove the paper before I put it together..... I'll press and trim to size. All your suggestions were great.

    And I love that fold back method to paper piece. I'll have to try that on the next project. The only thing I wonder about is if you can put freezer paper in the printer. I don't think I want to hand trace all the paper piece patterns. The kimono block has 4 separate parts that get sewn together at the end. That would be 80 pieces of pattern to trace..... too much. I did hear someone say that they bought freezer paper in a regular 8 1/2 x 9" sheet size. Have any of you seen this?
    I get 8 1/2 x 11 freezer paper sheets from here: cjenkinscompany.com I haven't had any problems at all running it through my printer. I don't remember what I pay for it, but it's not terribly expensive and well worth the price to not have to trace on regular freezer paper and struggle with it jamming in the printer. A 200-sheet pack lasts a long time.

  12. #37
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Cloud, Minnesota
    Posts
    1,641
    Quote Originally Posted by nanna-up-north View Post
    Thanks everyone. It sounds like it's a personal choice. I guess I'll remove the paper before I put it together..... I'll press and trim to size. All your suggestions were great.

    And I love that fold back method to paper piece. I'll have to try that on the next project. The only thing I wonder about is if you can put freezer paper in the printer. I don't think I want to hand trace all the paper piece patterns. The kimono block has 4 separate parts that get sewn together at the end. That would be 80 pieces of pattern to trace..... too much. I did hear someone say that they bought freezer paper in a regular 8 1/2 x 9" sheet size. Have any of you seen this?
    Yes, I have ordered this and it goes right into your printer, no problem. I do not iron it to a piece of fabric, just put in one piece at a time. It's a bit heavier than freezer paper on the roll from the grocery store. I usually press it to my ironing surface one time before using it for PP, then it doesn't stick so hard to your PP pieced block. You can reuse it multiple times before it no longer sticks to your fabric. How many times depends on how many times you iron it, but I generally get 6 -7 blocks out of one piece. You fold your paper on each sewing line and then fold the paper back and stitch right next to the fold, so you are not sewing thru the paper. 8.5" X 11", 50 pages /pack www.cjenkinscompany.com

  13. #38
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    95
    I'm guessing this is one of the things I am liking about the Judy Niemeyer pattern I am working on....since you cut templates for the paper piecing, they are aligned so that you don't have bias edges at the edges of the blocks.

  14. #39
    Senior Member maxnme01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Victorville, Ca.
    Posts
    631
    I just purchased this same pattern last week. I have a HUGE stash of oriental fabrics I want to use. It's a generous block size and no teeny tiny slivers in it. Yah.
    Keep smiling, it makes others wonder what you're up to!

  15. #40
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,067
    Blog Entries
    1
    Many wash away stabilizers for embroidery...but pricey...
    haven't used them for paper piecing..
    .but save all the scraps add a small amount of water
    and it paints on with a brush to fabric and batting...great to sew through also..
    This liquid I use it to add on batting without sewing it ....
    The best kind of sleep from Heaven above...
    is under a quilt homemade with LOVE!

  16. #41
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire & Maine
    Posts
    3,050
    If you notice, the blocks all have a solid line around the edge, then a dotted line. This is to help you square up the block. The dotted line is 1/4" seam allowance. Do not remove the paper until the blocks are joined together. As you said, some of the pieces in the blocks are bias cut. By not removing the paper until everything is joined together, you avoid stretching and making the blocks "wonky". Yes, it is a lot of work to remove all the papers at the same time, but I always do this in front of the TV. I've made queen sized paper pieced quilts and removed the papers after the entire top was put together. Took awhile, but kept the blocks square.

    The method I use is probably similar to the fold and cut method mentioned above. I sew on the line indicated on the block using a generous amount of fabric. (I never precut fabrics, I just make sure the piece covers the # on the block I want to sew). I then fold the paper back onto the sewing line (paper is on top) I just sewed. Using a ruler, put the 1/4" mark on the sewn line (where the paper is folded back) and rotary cut off the fabric that hangs over the ruler edge. (I hope this is clear). Press the fabric with the paper still folded back. Now take the paper and top layer of fabric and open them. Press flat. (Clear as mud yet?) Continue on with the next piece in the block. Hope this helps!

    Anita
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  17. #42
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire & Maine
    Posts
    3,050
    One other thought on paper to use. I always use copy paper and have never had a problem removing it. I set my stitch length to 1.5 or 2 maximum - yes, tiny, but it perforates the paper well and it is easy to remove. Carol Doak also sells PP paper through her website. It is quite good, too. I have never used freezer paper. Made a couple of queen sized quilts with copy paper and no problems. JMHO.

    Anita
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  18. #43
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,197
    That's a darling pattern, and your block looks great. It's too late now, but maybe for the next one . . . I don't use paper for my paper piecing. I use the June Tailor nonwoven foundation sheets. They are 8-1/2" x 11" and go through either an inkjet or laser printer with no problem. And the best thing is that you don't have to take them off like paper. Just trim to size, and sew your blocks together. They are a little heavier than paper, but it's worth it for the time it saves. See http://www.joann.com/june-tailor-per...g/xprd1002406/

  19. #44
    Member Judy Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    68
    Yep! I have learned a lot about quilting from the internet, though.

  20. #45
    Senior Member bobquilt3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltnNan View Post
    i don't have to remove the paper as I use the fold back method of paperpiecing... love it!
    That's what I do, too. Great isn't it?

  21. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    27
    I don't have to worry about it as I use fabric - anything white and cheap - instead of paper. Just leave it on- gives the quilt a little extra thickness - maybe can use a thinner quilting.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.