Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 49

Thread: Pinning to the quilt frame - hat pins vs T pins vs ...?

  1. #1
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,790

    Pinning to the quilt frame - hat pins vs T pins vs ...?

    So, I've been able to play with my frame and machine a little. The thing I'm finding is that loading a quilt (so far charity quilts, so they're small) takes longer for me than the quilting does. The first one took 2 hours + to load, and an hour to quilt!

    One of the things taking the time is pinning through the ticking on the leaders. Now, in fairness, the pins that came with the frame are terrible. I'd swear they were dull if they weren't brand new.

    They're T Pins (http://www.dritz.com/brands/showcase...p?ITEM_NUM=101) , and I also find the presser foot of the machine hooks on them and yanks them out (when I baste to be able to remove the pins) and I'm afraid that one will get in the way of the needle and cause a real mess. I also find that because they're dull, or whatever, I'm losing 3/8" pieces of skin at a time when I skewer myself while pinning and they suddenly go through the ticking and fabric. (yes, I suppose my technique can use some work too)

    I've got some detachable zippers on order, and will be changing to that sort of set up (http://dragonpoodle.blogspot.ca/2012...-quilting.html) when they arrive, but for now, I'd just like to stop bleeding on the quilts and speed things up a little.

    So I figured, what better place to ask than here.... what do you all prefer for pinning to the leaders?

    I've been looking at hat/corsage pins. I figured out my flower headed pins are too thin and bend, so they're out. Are there other suggestions?

  2. #2
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    21,925
    Sorry about your bleeding - - -

    I don't have a long-arm - so really can't help you - but I have heard some mention of 'leaders' - I think they just clip on - maybe something called 'red snappers'?

    I'm sure that the people that KNOW something about this will be helping you out soon - - -

  3. #3
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,020
    I don't have a long-arm either. But would safety pins work? That's what I use when I'm quilting at my sewing machine.
    --- Jean

    I'd rather spend money on my quilting hobby than the therapist.... I'm probably $$$ ahead.... and I'm happy!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member cindi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Grove City, OH
    Posts
    789
    There are quilting pins you can buy. I use ones with a flower head. They're long and the head is flat, so they don't cause a lump when you roll the quilt (not that that's a real bother). I took a class at one of the quilt shows with Linda Taylor, and she used what looked like corsage pins. They worked really well, too. Just make sure you get LONG pins, not short pins, or you'll be pinning for days!

  5. #5
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,790
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    Sorry about your bleeding - - -

    I don't have a long-arm - so really can't help you - but I have heard some mention of 'leaders' - I think they just clip on - maybe something called 'red snappers'?

    I'm sure that the people that KNOW something about this will be helping you out soon - - -
    I've seen those. I didn't know how well they worked (as in people like them or not). I've considered them, but have a concern about keeping the top and backing straight. I need all the help I can get there. Perhaps someone will see this and weigh in about them...? Another concern too is how much they would cost to ship to Canada, if I can even find someone who will. Which is the main reason I think I'm fabricating stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by nanna-up-north View Post
    I don't have a long-arm either. But would safety pins work? That's what I use when I'm quilting at my sewing machine.
    I have a sneaking suspicion that safety pins may have the same problem as the T Pins, as far as sharpness goes. That ticking is terribly hard to push through. I will try it though and see what I can come up with.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    England
    Posts
    555
    Haven't got a long arm but I did watch a You tube video where the young lady had resorted to small magnets to hold the backing fabric along the metal roller. She had tried the zipper and other methods but now found the magnets worked fine. She was very competent too.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Haverhill, MA
    Posts
    492
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by ArchaicArcane View Post
    I've seen those. I didn't know how well they worked (as in people like them or not). I've considered them, but have a concern about keeping the top and backing straight. I need all the help I can get there. Perhaps someone will see this and weigh in about them...? Another concern too is how much they would cost to ship to Canada, if I can even find someone who will. Which is the main reason I think I'm fabricating stuff.



    I have a sneaking suspicion that safety pins may have the same problem as the T Pins, as far as sharpness goes. That ticking is terribly hard to push through. I will try it though and see what I can come up with.
    I would not load a quilt without my red snappers. I practiced on a system that had zipper leaders, and you had to either pin or sew the quilt to the leaders in that case. With the red snappers, I never touch a pin. Matter of fact dont think there is a pin at all in my long arm room. Takes me about 15mins to fully load a quilt. it stays straight never had any issues with that. Would probably take me less time but I sorta poke around and listen to music

    I would definitely recommend them to any and all people who have long arms. They are a godsend! worth every single penny and then some.

    Nancy's Notions carries them:
    http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...ding+system.do
    and her shipping policy says to just add $9 to the US shipping cost.....
    http://www.nancysnotions.com/categor...?intcmp=FFSHIP
    Last edited by CarolynMT; 08-16-2013 at 11:24 AM.

  8. #8
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,666
    Until your zippers arrive, I'd switch to corsage pins. No point in buying Red Snappers if you're switching to zippers, imho. Corsage pins can be found online at longarm supply places or locally at florist supply places and craft stores (not sure what those would be in Alberta, sorry).
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  9. #9
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    13,536
    T pins are probably the worst pins you could use, IMHO. They are not sharp, and I don't even like the idea of them going through my quilt fabric. When I pinned I used those yellow-headed pins. They're strong and sharp (enough) and they show up when I drop them on the carpet. Now I use Red Snappers. I tried pinning, then Velcro. The problem with Velcro or zippers is that you still have to attach the fabric to the leaders, which means sewing or pinning. Red Snappers solve the whole problem and they come off very easily. I use Red-E-Edge clamps for the sides too, and love them as much as the Snappers.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    1,908
    I have zippered leaders and just recently switched to using Red Snappers...I really like them, I can load my quilts in about 10 minutes now. Before, I used the corsage pins you can buy through your quilt store...but beware, they have huge heads, so to run over one of them is to invite disaster! If you really want "tearless" loading, buy the red snapper type clamps...best part of it is, there are no pin-sticks to worry about!
    If you feel like you're special...it's 'cause you are!
    Momto5

  11. #11
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    9,256
    once you've Snapped, there is no going back ;-)
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  12. #12
    Super Member quilter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ayr, Ontario
    Posts
    1,064
    Blog Entries
    326
    T pins are useless for this purpose. I use the long flat flower pins.

  13. #13
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,902
    Blog Entries
    1
    I've been using 2" long flower pins for years- they are sharp, flat and with practice I have managed to be much faster loading- I can generally load a king sized quilt top, backing & batting In less than an hour. just takes practice & getting a 'routine'...and nice sharp flat pins...the T pins I have seen are so thick...I can not imagine trying to force them through the canvas leaders- my flower pins are thin & sharp- goes through the canvas easily.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  14. #14
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    21,925
    The Red Snappers concept looks a lot like the q-snap frame. Are they similar in concept?

  15. #15
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,944
    I fist used corsage pins: 100 in the box, sold by a quilt store that used to send a truck with orders from California.

    I also have a Quiltak gun and use their 2" fasteners for the bottom of the top of the quilt. I found I could get closer to the quilt top edge when using my HQ.

    I now have red snappers for the take up roller and the backing roller bars. I also used them for the quilt top but haven't finished the quilt now on the frame. So, not sure if I'll remove them from the quilt top when I get to the bottom of it.

    Re: red snappers ... I couldn't put the rods together and had to get help from a fellow quilter's husband [he's an engineer and I knew he wouldn't harm my red snappers.] Also, the first few times using the r.s. will probably require more time and hand pressure. Mine took me a bit of time but at my friend's home her r.s.'s were easier to put on.

    I also have the magnet bars from Harbor Freight so I can float my top. Just haven't used them yet.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  16. #16
    Super Member MaryStoaks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    La Quinta, CA
    Posts
    3,925
    I use the quilting pins with yellow plastic round heads. They come in boxes of 500, pretty reasonable price-wise. I just bought a new supply and tossed my old (5 years) ones. New pins do make loading easier. Just like rotary blades, change them when they're dull.
    Mary

  17. #17
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    9,256
    yes, a sleeve snaps over the material and tubing. more flexible than PVC. Some sort of plastic extrusion. The tubing fits inside a sleeve on your leaders.
    Last edited by DebraK; 08-16-2013 at 06:43 PM.
    I have chosen to be happy because it is good for my health - Voltaire

  18. #18
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Not Here
    Posts
    3,790
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingloulou View Post
    Haven't got a long arm but I did watch a You tube video where the young lady had resorted to small magnets to hold the backing fabric along the metal roller. She had tried the zipper and other methods but now found the magnets worked fine. She was very competent too.
    I watched that video after you mentioned it. I can't figure out how the magnets don't deform the fabric (assuming they're earth magnets) or slide right off (assuming they're not) She does a good job with it, I must tension my quilts tighter than she does, cos it seems like it shouldn't stay, even though it does. I've read / watch a few of CraftyGemini's offerings. I agree, she seems competent.

    Quote Originally Posted by CarolynMT View Post
    I would not load a quilt without my red snappers. I practiced on a system that had zipper leaders, and you had to either pin or sew the quilt to the leaders in that case. With the red snappers, I never touch a pin. Matter of fact dont think there is a pin at all in my long arm room. Takes me about 15mins to fully load a quilt. it stays straight never had any issues with that. Would probably take me less time but I sorta poke around and listen to music

    I would definitely recommend them to any and all people who have long arms. They are a godsend! worth every single penny and then some.

    Nancy's Notions carries them:
    http://www.nancysnotions.com/product...ding+system.do
    and her shipping policy says to just add $9 to the US shipping cost.....
    http://www.nancysnotions.com/categor...?intcmp=FFSHIP
    I was going to use my chainstitching machine to do the zipper, but I can see how that will wear out and wear thin eventually.

    I gave in. After all the rave reviews for the Red Snappers, I located a set in Edmonton. They were pricy, but I get to use them as soon as I get the current quilt off the frame. About $20 more than if I'd shipped them from Nancy's notions. I think it was the times people are taking to load a quilt that convinced me.

    So you must be doing the baste the batting to the backing then use it as a reference then baste the top to the reference line method? It looks slick. I'll be trying that once I get the current quilt off the frame.

    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    Until your zippers arrive, I'd switch to corsage pins. No point in buying Red Snappers if you're switching to zippers, imho. Corsage pins can be found online at longarm supply places or locally at florist supply places and craft stores (not sure what those would be in Alberta, sorry).
    I probably phrased that badly. A month ago, I found someone who would order the zippers for me. She said she had no idea when she'd get the order done, so I can call her and say thanks but I don't need them anymore. The craft stores I can find. The others I'm not sure of. Luckily, I get wholesale on my sewing notions anyway, and corsage pins are one of the things I can get.

    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    T pins are probably the worst pins you could use, IMHO. They are not sharp, and I don't even like the idea of them going through my quilt fabric. When I pinned I used those yellow-headed pins. They're strong and sharp (enough) and they show up when I drop them on the carpet. Now I use Red Snappers. I tried pinning, then Velcro. The problem with Velcro or zippers is that you still have to attach the fabric to the leaders, which means sewing or pinning. Red Snappers solve the whole problem and they come off very easily. I use Red-E-Edge clamps for the sides too, and love them as much as the Snappers.
    I had been thinking about having to create another leader for the zippers to attach to, and being able to get that crooked too, and,... you're right. The RSs seem like they're less fussy. I need less fussy, because I don't need anything stopping me from quilting.

    Do the RSs ever deform the fabric with how firmly they install?

    I would probably look at the Red E-Edge clamps if I hadn't built the side leaders that Sharon Schamber uses.

    Quote Originally Posted by momto5 View Post
    If you really want "tearless" loading, buy the red snapper type clamps...best part of it is, there are no pin-sticks to worry about!
    Yes, Apparently I am very motivated by avoiding pain

    Quote Originally Posted by DebraK View Post
    once you've Snapped, there is no going back ;-)
    I laughed out loud when I read this. The people in the food court of the mall I was walking through thought I was a nut. This settled it for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by AliKat View Post
    I now have red snappers for the take up roller and the backing roller bars. I also used them for the quilt top but haven't finished the quilt now on the frame. So, not sure if I'll remove them from the quilt top when I get to the bottom of it.

    Re: red snappers ... I couldn't put the rods together and had to get help from a fellow quilter's husband [he's an engineer and I knew he wouldn't harm my red snappers.] Also, the first few times using the r.s. will probably require more time and hand pressure. Mine took me a bit of time but at my friend's home her r.s.'s were easier to put on.

    I also have the magnet bars from Harbor Freight so I can float my top. Just haven't used them yet.
    Thanks for the warning about the first couple of uses. I'll make sure DH Is around to help if necessary. I'd like to hear what you decide to do when you get to the bottom of your quilt!
    What was difficult about assembly? It looked straight forward in the video I watched, but if there's a gotcha....

    How do the magnet bars work? I don't think I've heard of that before... or is this the same as quiltingloulou mentioned above?

  19. #19
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    England Alton Towers
    Posts
    6,640
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have a longarm and I stitched a piece of fabric very well onto the thick ticking. I then pin using any pins but I have recently started using curved safety pins to the fabric. Much easier than pushing through the ticking.

    Hope you find your answer.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  20. #20
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,931
    Quote Originally Posted by cindi View Post
    There are quilting pins you can buy. I use ones with a flower head. They're long and the head is flat, so they don't cause a lump when you roll the quilt (not that that's a real bother). I took a class at one of the quilt shows with Linda Taylor, and she used what looked like corsage pins. They worked really well, too. Just make sure you get LONG pins, not short pins, or you'll be pinning for days!
    Ditto on above mentioned flat flower pins....can take two bites w one pin....and pin head to toe across the canvas. Have been doing this for over ten yrs!

  21. #21
    Super Member alleyoop1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,346
    When I first got my quilt frame I followed the directions and bought t-pins - well, that didn't last long! They are way too thick to get through the fabric! So I switched to regular straight pins. I also have red snappers and use them for the backing and then I float the batting and quilt top. I run a straight line of stitches along the backing and batting and then line up the top to that line of stitches and then I stitch the top in place with a second long straight line of stitches. I use the straight pins to pin the backing to the leader that it rolls off of.
    If I am quilting a big quilt, I don't use my red snappers because they take up room and I am using a regular machine with a 7 1/2" harp and every 1/4" counts!! Hope this helps.

  22. #22
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx.
    Posts
    15,969
    Blog Entries
    3
    I spray baste and pin. I have T-pins that are sharp. Have had them for years from when I worked in the salons. I went to a beauty supply house that the public can go to and purchased another box. They're all sharp. I use a variety of pins when basting.

  23. #23
    Super Member thequilteddove's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,429
    I use corsage pins... This isn't where I get mine, but it's a great picture of what they look like. The are strong/hold well. They will make you bleed if you stick yourself or happen to run you arm across one accidentally http://www.longarmsupplies.net/corsagepins.aspx

  24. #24
    Super Member thequilteddove's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,429
    Oh, I just realized that perhaps your frame doesn't work the same way mine does. I only pin to the leaders... I pin the bottom of the backing on the lower leader, roll it a bit. I then pin the top of the backing & the top of the batting at the same time to the top leader. I then 'lock' my head and baste a line. Lay the top along that line and zigzag baste the top. Smooth it all out, clamp the sides & then baste the edges of the quilt top to the backing/batting.

    Wish I could find the video I initially learnt this method from... it's been a LONG time

  25. #25
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    18,358
    I use red snappers and just love them.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.