Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29

Thread: Pressing Strip Sets

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sacramento
    Posts
    96

    Pressing Strip Sets

    Do you have any hints on pressing strip sets? I'm working on six strips in a set and each strip is two and a half inches. I need to press the seams to the sides, and some need to be pressed one way and some the other so they will match when the sets are sewn into blocks. I would like to get a nice, crisp seam every time without pulling and tugging those seams when pressing. More often than not I get a tiny fold of fabric over the seam line. Any advice would be appreciated.

    Also, I'm using a cordless iron on high. It doesn't seem to get as hot as a regular iron. Could that also be part of the problem?

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,014
    I first set the seam then on the top run the iron right on the edge of the seam holding one strip up. I don't try to press to the side at this point. This appears to heat the seam. I then go back with the iron and press the seam to the side. This extra step seems to keep those small pleats from forming.

  3. #3
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,460
    Blog Entries
    2
    on long seams like strip sets, I set the seam with the iron, then run my fingernail (or wooden iron) along the seam to start pressing it to the side. Then I follow up with a hot iron. Seems like if I just use my iron, I get little folds.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  4. #4
    Super Member needles3thread's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3,362
    There is a tool made for pressing strip sets called The Strip Stick. It comes in 2 different lengths. (45" or 18")
    www.thestripstick.com. made in Texas USA It is a stick with a cloth covered
    curved pressing surface. Hope this helps.

  5. #5
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    Quote Originally Posted by needles3thread View Post
    There is a tool made for pressing strip sets called The Strip Stick. It comes in 2 different lengths. (45" or 18")
    www.thestripstick.com. made in Texas USA It is a stick with a cloth covered
    curved pressing surface. Hope this helps.

    I'll second this. You'll get perfectly straight strip sets every time. Plus you can press seams to one side or press them open. Wrong side up presses them open and right side up presses them to one side.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,288
    I also set my seam then I press from the front to avoid the little creases that can sneak in on me when I iron from the back. If, as usual, I'm pressing to the dark, I put the light down on the board and hold the dark up with my left (non-ironing) hand as I let the seam allowance lay to the side and press carefully - that probably doesn't make sense to any of you...does it?
    Kate

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,041
    When pressing strip sets I always press to the same side ( ususally darker) on each set. This seems to allow the seams to be alternate ways when sewing blocks together. Also I set the seam by lightly pressing seam closed before pressing to one side. I just did 20+ set and this pressing worked ever time.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    11,887
    Blog Entries
    1
    I third the StripStick. If you cannot afford it, look for unfinished half-round molding in a hardware store (not all places have it; you do *not* want three-quarter's round). You don't even have to cover it with fabric (the StripStick is covered with muslin). Works great for keeping the seams straight, and you can press either to the side or open.

    Here's a link to the type of wood you would need:
    http://www.homedepot.com/buy/america...l#.UQ7Y2h3hq0I

  9. #9
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,496
    Thanks to all of you for your suggestions. I am going to make strip sets tomorrow. Now I feel better about pressing them. Thanks!!!

  10. #10
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Piedmont Virginia in the Foothills of the Blue Ridge Mtns.
    Posts
    8,199
    I press from the front (right side) of the strip set, pressing toward the upper strip with the point of the iron. Then I go back over the set with the iron making sure there are no tiny folds along the seam line.

    Jan in VA
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums19552.html

  11. #11
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    28,379
    Pressing one seam at a time would make it easier. Put strips across the ironing board and press at an angle. Lynette Jensen tells and shows how to do this in some of her books. If you follow the seam with the iron it may not turn out very well.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  12. #12
    Super Member Girlfriend's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    San Clemente, CA
    Posts
    1,183
    Be sure to use a hard pressing surface. A softer mushy surface will allow those little pleats. I made my own small ironing board to be used beside my machine. I followed Sharon Schamber's you tube video. It's just one piece of batting against a 3/4 pressboard. Hope this helps.

  13. #13
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    6,130
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks, Jan. Never thought about the side of the iron being curved and affecting the strip! I also press open each seam as it's done instead of doing several seams at a time.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    637
    I sew them into pairs -- then press those pairs; then connect the pairs and press those seams. This is what I have found to be the best way for me.

    Linda in MO

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    6,523
    Quote Originally Posted by needles3thread View Post
    There is a tool made for pressing strip sets called The Strip Stick. It comes in 2 different lengths. (45" or 18")
    www.thestripstick.com. made in Texas USA It is a stick with a cloth covered
    curved pressing surface. Hope this helps.
    Just ordered one in each size. Really looks like it will help with this problem! Thanks for the link!

  16. #16
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,660
    So many different suggestions, all worth trying on sample sets before deciding what works best for you.

    I set my seams from the wrong side of the fabric, then press them to one side from the right side of the fabric by bumping the straight edge of the iron right next to the seam ridge to lay the strip over flatly. When they're all done, I press the whole set from both the front and the back sides. Pressing from the front eliminates any and all unintended pleats or folds.

    In general, strip sets do not 'warp' if they're pressed with the set running across the ironing board instead of along the ironing board. Irons also heat higher on a dry setting than a on steam setting.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,041
    Did not know about the iron haveing curverd surface. Will from now on use dry iron,lay strip across board and use tip of iron Thanks for the tips. You ladies are GREAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,296
    I found a way to use my ironing board for a "strip stick". Lay the strip set on the ironing board the long way. Press the first seam that is close to you as you wish. Lay the strip set on the board with the first strip hanging just below the edge of the ironing board. That way you can get at the second strip without disturbing what you did on the first one. Then pull it down so that the second seam is hanging over and work on the third, etc.

    I may make myself a set of strip sticks some day, but the ironing board works for me for now.
    Last edited by maviskw; 02-05-2013 at 07:10 AM.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  19. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Orbiting
    Posts
    1,442
    Thanks for all the suggestions! I think it's neat that one person asks a question and several of us benefit from it.

  20. #20
    Super Member jrhboxers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lexington Park, Maryland
    Posts
    1,143
    I use a homemade stripstik. Mine is made up of a 3 foot piece of closet rod that my woodworking neighbor has split in two. That gives me a setter piece that is almost 2" across. I used a couple of layers of batting and a piece of muslin on each piece. My neighbor was also nice enough to router out the center portion on the bottom. That left me with notch to fasten the cover and then covered the bottom with a smooth piece of thin wood. Love it and I can put them together and do full length seams without a problem.
    Jane
    Physically in Maryland but heart is in Indianapolis.

    Rescued Boxers are adoptable love. Please consider a homeless/rescued pet when adding to your family.

  21. #21
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,065
    Blog Entries
    20
    I sure didn't know that when I started to quilt that there were so many tiny little things I would need to learn to make these quilts so beautiful. Thanks for all the great tips.
    Vonda-Texas MiMi of 4 Beautiful Grandbabies

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    south of Houston, TX
    Posts
    186
    Jan, I was so impressed with your computer generated art work. Great job!

  23. #23
    Super Member carslo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    soCal
    Posts
    1,527
    Blog Entries
    5
    I have been shying away from strip sets due to bowing even when using half the WOF pieces. With some new tools and pressing ideas I might just try them again. Thanks everyone.
    A bed without a quilt is like the night sky without stars.

    http://californiaquilting.blogspot.com/

  24. #24
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,660
    Quote Originally Posted by carslo View Post
    I have been shying away from strip sets due to bowing even when using half the WOF pieces. With some new tools and pressing ideas I might just try them again. Thanks everyone.
    Stitching the seams from alternate ends eliminates the bowing, so try that as well as the pressing tips. Stitch the first seam and then stitch the second one from the end you ended the first, the third from the end you ended the second, etc.
    Last edited by ghostrider; 02-06-2013 at 09:29 AM.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  25. #25
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,735
    Blog Entries
    5
    I just ordered the long one. I figure I'd rather pay the person who came up with the idea than drive 1/2 hour to town and find a p;ace that sells this specific piece of wood. I always buy from the inventor, always! I figure they pay for the ads, which cost a lot, and they came up with the idea, which is pretty cool, so I give them credit. They are usually quilters themselves trying to make a buck.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.