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Thread: Prewashing Fabrics -Why Shouldn't I use my Tide Pods?

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Watson View Post
    I wash the fabrics just like I do regular fabrics. Darks and lights with regular detergent.
    I have a fear of shrinkage, so always pre-wash and dry my yardage.

    Watson
    I do mine this way also. Always pre-wash.

  2. #27
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    I wash all my fabrics first and always use my Tide pods and have never had a problem. When washing precuts I always put them in a mesh bag or old stocking and tie the top to keep them in. I have never heard not to use the pods before so I use them on everything.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    It's what I do. I've had enough bleeders and serious shrinkers to make it worth my effort.

    There are many who think the whole washing thing is totally unnecessary.

    So - it does come down to individual choice.

    I have measured before and after hundreds of pieces of fabrics to see if it was actuallyu worth the effort. For me, it is. I have also had at least one bleeder from every color family.

    Once the item has been assembled, I want it to be as care-free as possible.

    I still do fear bleach, burns, and tears.

    I agree. I prewash all panels I use. It only takes one time to ruin four to five hundred dollars of fabric.

  4. #29
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    Some people pre-wash some don't. I never pre-wash my fabrics. I just throw in a couple of color catchers the first time I wash the quilt if I think the colors will run. If it has a lot of light and dark fabrics I add an extra color catcher and use them for the first couple of washes. I have never had any problems doing this.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainwoman View Post
    I began quilting rag quilts and was taught to not prewash the flannel fabric; I've made several, and they turn out wonderfully. I then "graduated" to "real" quilting, so to speak (no insult to rag quilting........I think I should prewash the fabric. The backing -that also serves as the sashing and the binding- is Kona Cotton (steel gray); there are four different star war pieces of fabric to be put together as a panel of four, each separated by sashing per this technique There are some bright colors and some subdued colors in these fabrics; none of it was cheap, so I don't want to ruin it, potentially, through bleeding, or what ever. Okay, enough of this! I guess I scared to make this quilt. It would be easier to not prewash the fabric, but I just think I really should. SO, NO PROBLEM! Then I read that I should not use my regular fabric (Tide Pods). WHY NOT? I'm supposed to buy something like Orvas Quilt Soap. Huh?

    So, since I really need to get started on this quilt, could anyone out there advise me about (1) prewashing/non-prewashing and (2) can I just use my average laundry detergent or do I have to buy something special like "Quilt Soap."

    Thanks for helping a slowly maturing quilting novice!
    As far as quilts go, I'm certainly no expert. But as far as matters of fabric & their properties, I think I can comment with more knowledge and confidence. I chose to prewash & dry everything using Shout ColorCatcher sheets in the wash to prevent dye staining the other fabrics as a favorite laundry aid along with baking soda & Borax. Most people would be grossed out if they could see what disgusting things which walks across the fabric in shipment & storage along with the usual finishes (which might trigger an allergy) and possible hidden debris. Shrinkage with good grade cottons is minimal. Still even that potential problem is addressed & eliminated as well when prewashed. If the final finished quilt product is a never used or washed as a personal contact bedding, napkins, tablecloths, runners and the like-a wall hanging or some other eye candy sort of decoration-I don't bother.

    As for the choice of cleaning agents, I lean to the more proven sort of things like the laundry aids listed above. I (or rather my parents) used Tide many years ago for reasons I never could figure out. At first even I used it. Now I prefer a more gentle, yet as thoroughly cleaning, Arm & Hammer Skin Sensitive detergent for all my washable laundry needs. It is found in most stores, reasonable cost, and I personally don't see any difference with some commercially touted quilt soaps or whatever. If it's that delicate, I turned to hand washing with Woolite or Ivory.

    I do encourage you to try all suggested methods before you settle on one or a few.
    Last edited by Iona D.; 04-23-2017 at 10:23 AM.

  6. #31
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    Tide gives me itchy hives anyway.

  7. #32
    Super Member Onebyone's Avatar
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    I'm
    not sure what detergent pods are
    Only the best thing ever for laundry. Toss a pod in the washer and done. No measuring, no jugs or big boxes to handle, and all detergent brands have them now. I don't see how you cannot see them in the store.
    I love my life!

  8. #33
    Super Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
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    My first bed-size quilt was a white background whole cloth, embroidered quilt, with the dreaded red borders. Having had discussions with my cousin who had her own quilt shop, I knew there was a possibility of the red fabric bleeding -- it did, it bled rivers. I tried epsom salts, vinegar (2 gallons), and that accomplished nothing other than a waste of my time and money. I researched online and found a product which I always use if I have a bleeder, so I Test every solid color or printed fabric. If the test reveals bleeding, I treat the fabric, run it through the wash cycle, dry and iron, if needed. Plus, discretion is the better part of valor, so when the quilt is laundered prior to gifting or prior to using, I use color catchers. My grandfather always said he was a safety man, he used both a belt and suspenders, so like my grandfather, I will play it safe and use color catchers. As to detergents, I don't use any special soaps. I don't launder large quilts in my household washer -- I usually take those to the laundromat and use the extra-large machines. One caution: Most of our fabric today is chemically dyed, and since the dye is not organic, the use of vinegar, baking soda and/or epsom salts just simply doesn't work!
    Last edited by Jeanette Frantz; 04-23-2017 at 12:43 PM. Reason: Add

  9. #34
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    The main reason I prewash is to remove the chemicals from the fabrics, they destroy my fingers and finger nails.
    Is THAT what has happened to my nails??? I used to have GREAT nails! Now they are shell-y and break constantly.

    Sorry, off topic...back to your regularly scheduled programme!

    Watson
    Last edited by Watson; 04-23-2017 at 12:57 PM.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    [COLOR=#362F2D] I'm

    Only the best thing ever for laundry. Toss a pod in the washer and done. No measuring, no jugs or big boxes to handle, and all detergent brands have them now. I don't see how you cannot see them in the store.

    Mine doesn"t, thank goodness. Not at all economical.

  11. #36
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    I'm not a prewasher but I don't see why you couldn't use your usual soap, unless you're using antique fabric or making something for someone with sensitive skin. I wash in my usual soap when the projects done with a couple color catchers. Do whatever works for ya .

  12. #37
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    1. You don't need to use special detergent at any time. If it gets clothes clean, it'll get your quilts clean.
    2. I highly recommend soaking each color separately in a sink of warm water to check for bleeders. Those
    can get washed in a lingerie bag on gentle, with 2 Color Catchers per load. If you don't use a lingerie bag,
    those small pieces could end up lost in the rim or lip of the washer.
    3. Precuts will usually ravel in the wash. That's my biggest pet peeve. (I once got a batch of scraps that smelled smoky and so I washed them in a lingerie bag. What a mess to try to iron. Almost wasn't worth the hassle.) I wouldn't wash precuts that don't bleed in the sink.

    4. You could try soaking each precut in a bowl with warm water and vinegar. Vinegar stops bleeding, usually.

    Bottom line, precuts can save a lot of time and pain for your arthritic hands, but they are prone to shrinking and raveling, so you'd be least bothered by NOT washing any that don't bleed.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by popover View Post
    Mine doesn"t, thank goodness. Not at all economical.
    When a jug of Tide slipped out of my hand and most of it went behind the washer and two months later DH knocked over a box of powder detergent that was open and went between the washer dryer and everywhere else, that was the end of buying nothing but pods from then on. Worse cleaning jobs ever! Every time I mop the laundry room floor I still get soapy film. I buy the large refill bag of pods, very economical. The store stockers love them, easy to stock and no back breaking boxes of heavy jugs or boxes. Cost less for shipping, more packages per case. I think all brands will be all pods before long.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Watson View Post
    Is THAT what has happened to my nails??? I used to have GREAT nails! Now they are shell-y and break constantly.

    Sorry, off topic...back to your regularly scheduled programme!

    Watson
    Chemicals are really nasty for your nails. I show cars and some of the chemicals used are not nail friendly. I've found that if I use a good strengthening base like Nailtiques and then polish, I'm okay. I've started doing the same thing when quilting. I make sure I have Nailtiques and polish on. It seems to protect my nails from the chemicals.
    Patrice S

  15. #40
    Super Member Onebyone's Avatar
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    The store stockers love them, easy to stock and no back breaking boxes of heavy jugs or boxes. Cost less for shipping, more packages per case. I think all brands will be all pods before long.

    I think you are right.
    At our small town grocery store this morning, nothing on the detergent aisle but pods. All different brands. Checker said it saved shelf space and easier to stock.
    I love my life!

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by fruitloop View Post
    The store stockers love them, easy to stock and no back breaking boxes of heavy jugs or boxes.
    I would have loved them back in the 80's when I had to go to the laundry mat. Liquid detergent wasn't popular yet. I finally found one brand of powder that came in a plastic jug that resealed nicely.
    Pat

    Pfaff 7510, Viking Mega Quilter, Viking Quilt Designer II, Singer Treadle

    http://craftypat.blogspot.com/

  17. #42
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    Pods sounds intriguing but how do you do small loads? Sometimes I have to do an immediate small load and I need to be able to use less soap.

  18. #43
    Super Member Onebyone's Avatar
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    I only do small loads of clothes so I use one pod. For large load, like bed sheet set, I use two pods.
    I love my life!

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austinite View Post
    Pods sounds intriguing but how do you do small loads? Sometimes I have to do an immediate small load and I need to be able to use less soap.
    That's one of the reasons I don't like pods. I like to adjust my detergent use to the load. I also heard that the covering of the pods doesn't always dissolve and can cause plumbing problems, but I don't know that for a fact.
    Patrice S

  20. #45
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    I pre-wash all my "yardage" fabrics including fat quarters because the sizing they put on fabrics irritates my skin, and sometimes my eyes. It's nice to know if the fabric will run or fade too, but mostly I need to be able to handle them!

    I use whatever "free & clear" detergent we have at home at the time, sometimes with ammonia, sometimes with washing soda. No Evil Softener or dryer sheets. (If you want to see me claw my skin off, give me a towel that was washed in Tide and dried with dryer sheet.)

  21. #46
    Super Member Onebyone's Avatar
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    If I touch a pod with wet fingers it will dissolve immediately so I think it dissolves covered in water. It's nice to have choices.
    I love my life!

  22. #47
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    I love the pods too. There have been a time or two when the cover didn't totally dissolve, so I just ran it through another rinse cycle. The only detergent I can't get in pods is Woolite for Darks. It works well for my jeans and my DH's black pants that he wears when he works. So if I need a little bit that is what I use - and I have been known to use a very small bit of the blue Dawn dish soap. (I use it hand washing so why not?)

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