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Thread: Pricing quilts?

  1. #1
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    I know some of you on here make quilts for a living. I've been thinking about it for a while and I'm considering the idea of doing that myself, even though a lot of people I know wouldn't support the idea.

    I was just wondering, for those who sell your quilts, how do you figure out the price of your quilts?

  2. #2
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying_V_Goddess
    I know some of you on here make quilts for a living. I've been thinking about it for a while and I'm considering the idea of doing that myself, even though a lot of people I know wouldn't support the idea.

    I was just wondering, for those who sell your quilts, how do you figure out the price of your quilts?
    Sell? Sell a Quilt????

    I would never sell a quilt... too much of my life tied up in them.


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    .



    But offers starting at $250,000 will be considered.

    tim in san jose

  3. #3

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    That is a really good question. I have people that will see one of my quilts and ask me how much will I charge to make them one. And I'm stumped. Theres alot of work, time, creativity, and how do you determine a price. Let alone the cost for doing one.

  4. #4
    SandraJennings's Avatar
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    Someone told me once that the basic rate to charge is the cost of materials + labor x 3. (Labor cost is $per hour.) I timidly would figure it for my cakes and candies....always surprised at the price...even more by the payment and return orders. I must however admit, I have never sold a quilt.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by SandraJennings
    Someone told me once that the basic rate to charge is the cost of materials + labor x 3. (Labor cost is $per hour.) I timidly would figure it for my cakes and candies....always surprised at the price...even more by the payment and return orders. I must however admit, I have never sold a quilt.
    If that's the case then my quilts are worth at least $1,000 if not more. But I don't think anyone would spend that much money on one of mine. If I were to sell for profit I would have to buy the cheapest fabs that I could find and cut corners to save time. BUT and and big BUT I don't think I could compromise my personal ethics to create a cheaply made product. I always strive for quality. But that's just me. Fortunately I don't have to sell my quilts to make a living but if you did then that would be the way to go. These are just my feelings.

  6. #6
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    I would be hard pressd to price a quilt for sale. I simply don't think anyone would pay what I think they are worth according to the time I put into it and cost of fabrics. No one would pay me for 2 or 3 months or more of work that it took to make a big quilt, so I make little ones and give them away. Not a very good answer I am afraid. I have thought about selling baby quilts once I retire because most of them can be done completely on the machine in less time. I sold one once for $100 years ago, but it was probably worth much more. So did I confuse you even more? LOL

  7. #7
    Senior Member triciasquilts's Avatar
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    Well, here we go................since this is what I do for a living!!!! I worked retail for 26 yrs and also did buying for these stores that I worked for, therefore knowing a little about pricing. Not much, but a little!!
    When I price an item that I make, I usually consider the price of the fabric only, then times that by 2 or 3 the amount. These are for my small items such as table runners, totebags,small lap quilts etc. The big quilts that I do, I take into consideration the pattern that I will be doing and consider my time. Thats the hard part because people just don't understand the time to make these. But every year before Christmas, I have at least 1 or 2 queen size quilts that I will have to get done, and they sure make for some good spending money at Christmas! I use my gut feeling on these. Its the hardest thing I have to do.

    I do buy alot of my fabric on sale and use Joanns mostly for these types of items. Plus I have to consider the area that I live in. Makes a big difference. People won't spend alot aroung here. Check out my ebay store and you can see how I price some things. Hope this helped a little.



  8. #8

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    you ladies haven't mentioned the blood ,sweat, and tears.oh believe me i've poked my fingers enough times , you should really take that into consideration to. tia sarah

  9. #9
    SandraJennings's Avatar
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    ergo: with those things in mind......is the cost really too much? Beethoven wasn't paid nearly enough for the beauty of his musical works, nor would some say Michealangelo, even more current artist, say, Charles Russell? If it holds a part of you...value it ...everything else will take care of itself. Whether you sell or gift it...it is priceless, and as we have recently seen with Leslee's quilt, an enduring treasure. Truly priceless.

  10. #10
    Super Member Flying_V_Goddess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by triciasquilts
    Well, here we go................since this is what I do for a living!!!! I worked retail for 26 yrs and also did buying for these stores that I worked for, therefore knowing a little about pricing. Not much, but a little!!
    When I price an item that I make, I usually consider the price of the fabric only, then times that by 2 or 3 the amount. These are for my small items such as table runners, totebags,small lap quilts etc. The big quilts that I do, I take into consideration the pattern that I will be doing and consider my time. Thats the hard part because people just don't understand the time to make these. But every year before Christmas, I have at least 1 or 2 queen size quilts that I will have to get done, and they sure make for some good spending money at Christmas! I use my gut feeling on these. Its the hardest thing I have to do.

    I do buy alot of my fabric on sale and use Joanns mostly for these types of items. Plus I have to consider the area that I live in. Makes a big difference. People won't spend alot aroung here. Check out my ebay store and you can see how I price some things. Hope this helped a little.
    That really helped. Thanks!

  11. #11

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    f v g, you must never forget the blood sweat or tears.you know what i'm sure what ever it turns out looking like ,i'm sure your friend will just love your quilt .just because you made it........tia sarah

  12. #12
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    I have a friend and fellow guild member here in Pensacola. Claire does long arm quilting, and also makes quilts for customers. Her website is bellaquilting.com and her prices are listed there.

    I have one customer I make quilts for as a side job. It is really hard to price them because I put some much time and effort into them, then I pay Claire to do the quilting. (I don't even try because I know I would mess it up.)

    Usually I count the cost of the fabric, the cost of the quilting and add $100 for my time if it is a queen size or king. Charging what it is really worth would never be affordable, so I count the time I got to spend making something beautiful for someone who actually loves it when its done as a gift to them and a treat for me!

    I made a king size quilt for my own bed. Just the fabrics totalled over $300 and then there was the cost of getting it quilted - $180, so I know I couldn't sell it for even that much. Who would find it as beautiful as I do? See photo attached.

    Anyway, I had it appraised by a professional quilt appraiser, and it is worth $850!!! If I lost it in a fire or flood without that appraisal, I would only get about $50 because insurance companies consider it a "blanket" without an appraisal.

    I hope Claire's website helps you with the pricing!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    quiltmaker, do you have any idea what things the appraiser considered to get the value? and it is beautiful!

  14. #14
    quiltmaker101's Avatar
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    Quilt Appraisers base the value on quality of fabric, design, colors, pattern popularity, and the quality of the quilting itself. She looked for damage, fraying, what kind of binding and backing was used, etc. It took most of an hour for her to thoroughly evaluate it, and she took several photos.

    And she told me that Stack N Whack quilts are really not of lasting value - they are a fad. I guess I won't take a class on that one!

    Patterns that have been around forever are the best ones to make if you want a valuable quilt.

  15. #15
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    thank you for your response, it's interesting about the patterns

  16. #16
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    i don't doubt that a professional appraiser knows well enough the $$$ value "assigned" to quilts made between "then" and "now". but unless she has a crystal ball she can't possibly know whether or not stack-n-whack, or any other currently popular trend, will amount to a mere "fad". for all we know those quilts will either stand the test of time or bring piles of money 100 years from now because there aren't many still intact or being made.

    "they" sniffed and sneered at cotton fabric, gas, electricity, telephone, horseless carriages and computers.

    don't decide what to learn or pass by based on somebody else's opinion-driven speculation. follow your heart and instincts. that's the real foundation - and future - of quilting.

  17. #17

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    quiltmaker101, this is simply a beautiful quilt.

  18. #18
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    i don't doubt that a professional appraiser knows well enough the $$$ value "assigned" to quilts made between "then" and "now". but unless she has a crystal ball she can't possibly know whether or not stack-n-whack, or any other currently popular trend, will amount to a mere "fad". for all we know those quilts will either stand the test of time or bring piles of money 100 years from now because there aren't many still intact or being made.

    "they" sniffed and sneered at cotton fabric, gas, electricity, telephone, horseless carriages and computers.

    don't decide what to learn or pass by based on somebody else's opinion-driven speculation. follow your heart and instincts. that's the real foundation - and future - of quilting.
    I have to agree with the appraiser.. Stack and whack computers... they were just a fad.

    tim in san jose

  19. #19
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ
    i don't doubt that a professional appraiser knows well enough the $$$ value "assigned" to quilts made between "then" and "now". but unless she has a crystal ball she can't possibly know whether or not stack-n-whack, or any other currently popular trend, will amount to a mere "fad". for all we know those quilts will either stand the test of time or bring piles of money 100 years from now because there aren't many still intact or being made.

    "they" sniffed and sneered at cotton fabric, gas, electricity, telephone, horseless carriages and computers.

    don't decide what to learn or pass by based on somebody else's opinion-driven speculation. follow your heart and instincts. that's the real foundation - and future - of quilting.
    And just think... Log cabin was just the stack and whack of it's day.

    tim in san jose

  20. #20

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    how could any body call someyhing made from your heart ,something you pour so much of your time ,and so much of your self into,weather it's a stack and wack or it could be any other quilt . a fad ... i say shame on that person.

  21. #21
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    Sarah, you have hit the nail right on the head.

    besides, different methods come and go in popularity. crazy quilts started out as a "fad" then "went away" for years. now they're all the rage again. what started out as a way to use up scraps and show off embroidery skills has turned into a "technique", complete with books, patterns and classes. go figure. 8)

  22. #22
    rebeerose's Avatar
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    My Sister-in-law and I make and sell quilts here in the Southwestern New York State ( 2hrs south of Buffalo). We have found that you need to talk to find out how quilts will sell in your area and what the people are willing to pay. Here, we sell for a baby quilt (40"x40") for $145. And King size (110"x110") we sell for $400. That is for tied quilts. If they were machine quilted we coulod charge $150 more for each. Lap quilts (5'x5') is $165, twin sell for $200, and Queen is $300. Check with quilt shop owners in your area are your local chamber of commerce. They should give you some idea of what to sell your quilts for. One quilt shop owner here told me that add your cost of all the material, and then add on $10/ hr for your labor and time. that should equal the price of your quilt. But it does depend on your area where you are living and the cost of living in that area. Hope this helps you! Beckie

  23. #23
    Senior Member Extreme Quilter's Avatar
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    Quiltmaker, your quilt is stunning.

  24. #24
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rebeerose
    My Sister-in-law and I make and sell quilts here in the Southwestern New York State ( 2hrs south of Buffalo). We have found that you need to talk to find out how quilts will sell in your area and what the people are willing to pay. Here, we sell for a baby quilt (40"x40") for $145. And King size (110"x110") we sell for $400. That is for tied quilts. If they were machine quilted we coulod charge $150 more for each. Lap quilts (5'x5') is $165, twin sell for $200, and Queen is $300. Check with quilt shop owners in your area are your local chamber of commerce. They should give you some idea of what to sell your quilts for. One quilt shop owner here told me that add your cost of all the material, and then add on $10/ hr for your labor and time. that should equal the price of your quilt. But it does depend on your area where you are living and the cost of living in that area. Hope this helps you! Beckie
    This is good information. I sat down with a calculator...

    Based upon the speed (or lack of) that I quilt... That 250,000 dollars is way too low a price for my quilt. Sorry.

    tim in san jose

  25. #25
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter
    Quote Originally Posted by rebeerose
    My Sister-in-law and I make and sell quilts here in the Southwestern New York State ( 2hrs south of Buffalo). We have found that you need to talk to find out how quilts will sell in your area and what the people are willing to pay. Here, we sell for a baby quilt (40"x40") for $145. And King size (110"x110") we sell for $400. That is for tied quilts. If they were machine quilted we coulod charge $150 more for each. Lap quilts (5'x5') is $165, twin sell for $200, and Queen is $300. Check with quilt shop owners in your area are your local chamber of commerce. They should give you some idea of what to sell your quilts for. One quilt shop owner here told me that add your cost of all the material, and then add on $10/ hr for your labor and time. that should equal the price of your quilt. But it does depend on your area where you are living and the cost of living in that area. Hope this helps you! Beckie

    This is good information. I sat down with a calculator...

    Based upon the speed (or lack of) that I quilt... That 250,000 dollars is way too low a price for my quilt. Sorry.

    tim in san jose
    So, do you have the first Million Dollar quilt?? If so, how much are you going to charge us to see it?

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