Quiltingboard Forums

Quiltingboard Forums (https://www.quiltingboard.com/)
-   Main (https://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1/)
-   -   Kid friendly Machine??? (https://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1/kid-friendly-machine-t99751.html)

CloverPatch 02-14-2011 09:01 AM

1 Attachment(s)
My eldest daughter(Anna 13) uses my maching an ellure plus.
I have a soon to be 8 yr old (Eimly) that is interested in what Im doing. I waited till Anna was 12 before I let her sew, and it was on a Singer from the 70's.

My old Singer, has issues.
I have read on here about how some of you are letting your girls about Emilys age sew already and that they do well.
She wants to sew, and I am attaching her "quilt" that she taped together from my scraps.
My question is there a kid friendly machine that works well?
I have seen the Hello Kitty ones, but I worry that I am paying for the license on the character and not getting a quality machine.
Part of me is scared to death to let her quilt. What if she loses a finger! LOL I know, overbearing. But I don't want to miss this oppurtunity to catch her while she is really interested in this hobby.

Up North 02-14-2011 09:07 AM

I would go for an inexpensive brother I bought my granddaughter age 7 a Jamome Jem and she does so much better on the full size machine

Prism99 02-14-2011 09:10 AM

The Hello Kitty is the same as the Janome Jem that is sold by Sears Kenmore. There isn't much difference in price, but the Sears machine is probably a little cheaper and of course will remain a "grownup"-looking machine forever! I would say make a note of the features on the Hello Kitty, maybe print out a picture of it, and take it to Sears to get the equivalent machine there. If you can't get the Sears Kenmore version, I wouldn't hesitate to purchase the Hello Kitty version.

Have you checked the reviews on the Hello Kitty? They are uniformly good. Try Amazon and Overstock.com, or just Google "Hello Kitty" reviews.

Maia B 02-14-2011 09:13 AM

For my boys, ages 7 & 9, I have a Brother HS 2000, which is actually fabulous for $200. Only caveat is that the needle is off- center when I starts, so they have to remember to set the right stitch for straight stitching with the patchwork foot. I bought a Kenmore Mini Ultra for $50 from Sears on the advice of others, but haven't tried it yet. I also let them use a featherweight. On the vertical bobbin machines, I load the bobbin for them to avoid problems. So far, no thread nests or hurt fingers, and these are wild and crazy BOYS, so I think a girl that age ought to be fine.

cjr 02-14-2011 09:17 AM

My 8 yr old DGD loved my Janome 3128. It is the right size and does not intimidate a child. if she wANTS TO SEW and sees you sewing your machine would be fine. Most here learned on mother or grandmothers machine. Like many things I came from a one machine household.
By the way Hancocks puts this machine on sale regularly for less then $100.00.

Stogsdill 02-14-2011 09:18 AM

I have see some machines in Pawn shops, Of cource we live close to Fort Hood, a lot of families that move in and out of the area.

cherylynne 02-14-2011 09:19 AM

Yes, I definitely would let her sew. My almost 4 year old grandson sews on my lap and he has learned to pin and use scissors. I keep my rotary cutters and seam rippers on a skyhook, but he does enjoy playing with my older ruler. His favorite thing to do when he comes over is sew. I guide the fabric through the machine and he rests his little hands on top of mine. He loves fabric and sewing machines. I set him up with some fabric in a hoop and he practices hand sewing that I later take out and replace with another piece. Have fun and enjoy each others company and closeness.

DawnMarie 02-14-2011 09:44 AM

Since she is 8, I would start her on a full-size machine. It won't be long and she'll out grow the little one. Since she is enthusiastic about it, she should catch on quickly.

cdobbert40 02-14-2011 09:49 AM

I just bought a Janome Mini from Home Depot for $70.00 for my 5yo Granddaughter. It goes slow so I don't worry so much about her sewing a finger. The only problem I had with it was getting the tension right, lot of playing with tension and different threads but it works great, I have even used it myself a couple of times.

greensleeves 02-14-2011 10:09 AM

Some of the less expensive Brother's have a speed control. My daughter lets her sixth graders sew on this type and they are able to use it with little instruction. Every year her class makes donation quilts. I think an 8 yr old would be able to use this quite easily too.

ckcowl 02-14-2011 10:09 AM

when my granddaughters decided it was time to start sewing i bought them a brother machine from walmart...for about $90...the best thing about the machine was SPEED CONTROL...i could set it on slow and even when the foot pedal is depressed all the way the machine still goes slow...my youngest granddaughter was 4 when she started...she is now 10, has completed 7 quilts in 3 years and loves that machine....the other 2 girls have moved up to other machines but that first brother is still going strong for the younest :thumbup:

CloverPatch 02-14-2011 10:17 AM

I forgot about speed control. My Babylock has it. I don't use it, LOL, it is set to FAST FAST FAST.

I know she could use my machine, BUT I already share my machine with Anna. I so hate having to wait my turn! Then change out the thread, yada yada yada. I figured it would be easier on everybody if there was a second machine, primarily for the kids.
Speed control is definitly a feature I need to look for. Thank you I would have never thought to check on that.

misseva 02-14-2011 11:48 AM


Originally Posted by greensleeves
Some of the less expensive Brother's have a speed control. My daughter lets her sixth graders sew on this type and they are able to use it with little instruction. Every year her class makes donation quilts. I think an 8 yr old would be able to use this quite easily too.

One of my Brothers has a push button for sewing and a slide to control how fast/slow it will sew. My grown daughter LOVES this feature B/C she has not mastered the foot control speed.

JJC 02-14-2011 12:08 PM


Originally Posted by CloverPatch
My eldest daughter(Anna 13) uses my maching an ellure plus.
I have a soon to be 8 yr old (Eimly) that is interested in what Im doing. I waited till Anna was 12 before I let her sew, and it was on a Singer from the 70's.

My old Singer, has issues.
I have read on here about how some of you are letting your girls about Emilys age sew already and that they do well.
She wants to sew, and I am attaching her "quilt" that she taped together from my scraps.
My question is there a kid friendly machine that works well?
I have seen the Hello Kitty ones, but I worry that I am paying for the license on the character and not getting a quality machine.
Part of me is scared to death to let her quilt. What if she loses a finger! LOL I know, overbearing. But I don't want to miss this oppurtunity to catch her while she is really interested in this hobby.

By all means let her sew and just let her start out on your machine. I have a Bernina 1260 and my granddaughter who will turn 8 in March is very interested in sewing and has used my machine with my guidance. She did very well. Cherish your time spendt together and what fond memories you will have.

jane2 02-14-2011 12:14 PM

I have a Janome 3050 It's great for my grand aughters age 9 & 10. Just put it in slow speed and let them go! I learned to sew at 5 on an antique treadle Paveway machine. WheN my mother could finally afford an electric she taught me to use it . As a 8 yr old it helped shape my life and I Have been sewing for nearly 70 years. My 4 sister also learned at a very early age as did my brother. Dont be to protective JANE 2

Rose L 02-14-2011 12:14 PM

You have a lot of great suggestions here. I would second getting a full size machine. I started sewing at age 8 on my grandmothers full size 1946 singer, a straight stitch machine w/reverse. Once I started, I never looked back but have found the need to upgrade to machines with more functions over the years. Janome makes really decent machines with multiple functions for very little money as I'm sure most brands do. You can get a good quality machine with basic stitching, zig-zag and some embroidery stitches for around $200 dollars. Remember that they will probably use this machine until they are adults and are able to purchase one of their own. You are a wonderful mother for teaching and encouraging a craft that will last them a lifetime! Best wishes.

deema 02-14-2011 12:21 PM

Yes, the Hello Kitty one is a Janome. I wouldn't hesitate to buy it if I were in the market. The reviews on that machine are unanimously good.

But honestly, the only feature I need to see when using that machine to teach a youngster, is sewing speed control. I taught my daughter on my old machine without it, and she had a lot of difficulty controlling the machine (she's 5). Now with my newer machine that has the speed control, she does just fine. So that is the only *necessary* feature that I would look for in a machine for a child, anything else is just icing.

gollytwo 02-14-2011 12:41 PM

I bought my GD a Jem Gold when she was about 10 - I'd worry more about your GD using the rotary cutter than the sewing machine.

BellaBoo 02-14-2011 12:48 PM

I bought my granddaughter the 3/4 size Hello Kitty. It's the same as the Janome only green with logo. It sews great. She was using a Janome Gem machine but wanted the Hello Kitty one because it was so cute. I figured the real Hello Kitty machine (the 1/2 size is a toy) will probably be a collector's item one day so it could be one she'll be proud to show her grands! She gets my white FW to go along with it, heck she get all my stuff, she's my only grand!

grannyoquilting 02-14-2011 02:04 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I started my DGD out on my bernina 180 and she loved quilting at age 5. I pushed the pedal when she said "Fire in the hole." Her dad is military. I bought her a small Brother at Wal-Mart about 3 yrs ago at age 8. She loves it. Her mother uses it also. I also have a small SearsKenmore, (by small I mean not alot of extra's on them but full size), at my son's house. They all work fine and I use them when I go to stay. I quilt everywhere. Don't hesitate to get her a regular sewing machine the kid ones do not last well. And by all means get her quilting!!!!!!!!!

DGD at her Brother at the lake.

Butterflyblue 02-14-2011 02:32 PM

I bought a second-hand kenmore 3/4 size, and while it doesn't have speed control, it is very simple and I think it would be a good beginner machine. It's a real machine, not a toy. There are only four or so stitch options - long straight stitch, regular straight stitch, wide zigzag and narrow zigzag. maybe there is one more, I can't remember. It's at my MIL's house right now. Anyway, my MIL and I use it as a backup machine and to take to classes and such, and it's works great for basic piecing. The lack of stitch variety is its major drawback for me, but it would keep things simple for a kid.

emmah 02-14-2011 02:55 PM

I have one of those little Kenmore's and they are very simple to use. Instead of paying more for a Hello Kitty which is the same as the Kenmore, get some stickers for your girl to customize her machine. (I decorated my Singer Spartan base with floral border stickers and it's very cheery.)

KarenR 02-14-2011 03:04 PM

there are two types of hello kitty machines I have heard good things about the Janome one.

sueisallaboutquilts 02-14-2011 05:49 PM


Originally Posted by ckcowl
when my granddaughters decided it was time to start sewing i bought them a brother machine from walmart...for about $90...the best thing about the machine was SPEED CONTROL...i could set it on slow and even when the foot pedal is depressed all the way the machine still goes slow...my youngest granddaughter was 4 when she started...she is now 10, has completed 7 quilts in 3 years and loves that machine....the other 2 girls have moved up to other machines but that first brother is still going strong for the younest :thumbup:

Your granddaughter whose 10 has made 7 quilts? That is just fabulous!!!! :thumbup:

CloverPatch 02-14-2011 05:57 PM

I sat her down on my machine this afternoon. That took some prodding, thankyou! Don't know what scares me more her breaking my machine or her fingers! That was till I was reminded of speed control!

She is doing Okay, and loving it. Telling her little sister who is 6. "I can't play I must go quilt now"

We are putting together 4.5" blocks 10 strips of 8
I looked online at the janome, thinking about going to our shop here in town, then maybe also to sears. I agree with yall, a full size would probally be best. I only like to buy something once!

Kathy N 02-14-2011 06:00 PM

I bought my grandaughter the Hello Kitty machine. She is 7. She has had no problem at all with it. I have the equivalent in the Janome Gem and it works beautifully too. Very light weight and easy to handle. You can buy on ebay for a very reasonable price. However, if you buy through your local dealer, you can get free lessons for her.

Carol W 02-15-2011 02:42 AM


Originally Posted by CloverPatch
I sat her down on my machine this afternoon. That took some prodding, thankyou! Don't know what scares me more her breaking my machine or her fingers! That was till I was reminded of speed control!

She is doing Okay, and loving it. Telling her little sister who is 6. "I can't play I must go quilt now"

We are putting together 4.5" blocks 10 strips of 8
I looked online at the janome, thinking about going to our shop here in town, then maybe also to sears. I agree with yall, a full size would probally be best. I only like to buy something once!

When you go to your LQS, you might ask about trade - ins or refurbished machines that they might have.

CompulsiveQuilter 02-15-2011 04:33 AM

Don't even BOTHER with a "kid machine" - I bought the Hello Kitty machine for my 3 - yes 3 - year old grandaughter and it doesn't even have a bobbin or a foot pedal! And threading the needle required a magnifier and a pair of tweezers (I'm not kidding)> I bought her a Singer "easy stitch" from target for 25 bucks (same price as Hello Kitty) and preached about keeping her finger from the needle. She's sewing happily and safely.

girlsfour 02-15-2011 05:09 AM

You could buy a Janome Sew Mini. Adults even use these small machines. Watch Hancock Fabrics as they are on sale quite often for $49.99, even a couple of times a year they are $39.99. There are some other Janome's at Hancock Fabrics for roughly $89. on sale. They thread easy and are great for young sewers. Stay away from the more inexpensive Brother machines unless you try them. I have compared them, they are difficult to thread and don't run the smoothest.

And like someone else said, Janome makes Sears so they may have a comparable model...

patsyo56721 02-15-2011 05:10 AM


Originally Posted by CloverPatch
My eldest daughter(Anna 13) uses my maching an ellure plus.
I have a soon to be 8 yr old (Eimly) that is interested in what Im doing. I waited till Anna was 12 before I let her sew, and it was on a Singer from the 70's.

My old Singer, has issues.
I have read on here about how some of you are letting your girls about Emilys age sew already and that they do well.
She wants to sew, and I am attaching her "quilt" that she taped together from my scraps.
My question is there a kid friendly machine that works well?
I have seen the Hello Kitty ones, but I worry that I am paying for the license on the character and not getting a quality machine.
Part of me is scared to death to let her quilt. What if she loses a finger! LOL I know, overbearing. But I don't want to miss this oppurtunity to catch her while she is really interested in this hobby.

I got each of my grandaughters a Baby Lock BL9 for Christmas 2009. It was on sale for $99. and has several stitches. Again this Christmas 2010 it was again on sale. I believe the regular price is $129.00. It is also a good machine to take to sewing classes...

I Herd Ewe 02-15-2011 05:23 AM

Please get her a nice quality real machine. I bought a cheap sewing machine when I was in college and made a few things but I hated sewing with the machine. I loved hand sewing but nothing worked well for me on the machine. I thought it was me and gave up machine sewing for the next 20 years. Then, when my youngest daughter started sewing in 4-H (age 5), I took her to a 4-H meeting with the old machine and the instructor told me "Let her use my machine. She will hate sewing if she tries to learn on your machine." I went and bought a good machine for her and now, not only does she love sewing (now age 16), I also love sewing on that machine! We often start out on a new craft buying cheap poor quality equipment because we want to save money in case we don't continue in the craft. Having no experience with good equipment, we are frustrated trying to learn and give up because we don't enjoy it. Start her with good equipment even if you have to borrow it. (My daughter borrowed a machine from that wonderful 4-H leader for those first couple years while I saved money to buy the machine we now use.)

pllboyer 02-15-2011 05:29 AM

My daughter about had a stroke when I allowed my grandaughter who was about 9 to sew on my new Bernina. I had an old Singer but it was tempermental and wanted her to have a good experience. I supervised closely at first and then when she had a good feel for the machine and how to use it safely, turned her loose. She was very creative and was so proud when she'd come upstairs with a bag she'd designed in hand or some other project. Also gave her free rein on a box of scraps an inexpensive material. She sews now and I eventually gave her my old Bernina when I got a new one. I agree that you should let them sew when they are interested.

GladGrams 02-15-2011 05:41 AM


Originally Posted by DawnMarie
Since she is 8, I would start her on a full-size machine. It won't be long and she'll out grow the little one. Since she is enthusiastic about it, she should catch on quickly.

I agree wholeheartedly. My grandsons (10 & 7) were given full size "used machines" and they had no problems at all. In fact, being mechanically inclined they picked up the whole "thread a machine" without being taught.

QuiltingrandmafromMi 02-15-2011 06:40 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I think she should sew if she is showing interest. I was taking a sewing class when I was 7. Amazon.com has a Brother LS2125 for $59.99 plus free shipping. I would go with something like that! I would have killed for a machine of my own when I was 8. Go for it!

Blackberry 02-15-2011 06:42 AM


Originally Posted by CloverPatch
My eldest daughter(Anna 13) uses my maching an ellure plus.
I have a soon to be 8 yr old (Eimly) that is interested in what Im doing. I waited till Anna was 12 before I let her sew, and it was on a Singer from the 70's.

My old Singer, has issues.
I have read on here about how some of you are letting your girls about Emilys age sew already and that they do well.
She wants to sew, and I am attaching her "quilt" that she taped together from my scraps.
My question is there a kid friendly machine that works well?

I just bought my granddaughter a janome mini off Craig's list. She is 7 years old. I think this machine will last her for quite awhile. When she graduates to a larger machine, I can still use this one for piecing
I have seen the Hello Kitty ones, but I worry that I am paying for the license on the character and not getting a quality machine.
Part of me is scared to death to let her quilt. What if she loses a finger! LOL I know, overbearing. But I don't want to miss this oppurtunity to catch her while she is really interested in this hobby.


mjorgenson 02-15-2011 06:49 AM

Don't get an old used machine. A new cheaper one is better because you won't have as many issues with it. That is the quickest way to turn a kid off from sewing is to have to fight a machine. A Janome Jem Platinum is a good way to start in on a computer machine at a good price,

QUILTHER 02-15-2011 07:10 AM

My granddaughter got introduced to sewing machines early. At about 4 she would sit on my lap and sew. By 6 she was running my Kenmore. When I bought my Janome 6600P I took her with me and she prefers that now. She is 11 and loved the decorative stitches and thread painting and knows when she needs to rip out stitches. I say go as good as you can afford. I heard about a Brother recently that you can usually buy at Walmart or on Amazon.com for just under 200.00. Unfortunately I don't have the model number but it got great reviews. It has alot of decorative stitches, letters for monograming (she made a collar with a name on it for a stuffed animal). It has needle up/down option! I looked at local Walmart and they had it! I will be getting this for her 12th birthday as they are moving away. The kids today are way more tech saavy. I am going to go through some mending with her and a few more projects so when she moves she can take off and do what she wants. The one thing I did was tell her. If you have a question about how it is working ask me. And if it is not doing what it is suppose to - stop.
Diane/Wyoming
PS I have a Janome Jem and I am getting rid of it because none of us like to use it. I have it sold. It sews awesome but there is no 'creative' stitching as the stitches are preset. If they are working on a thread painting project there is not much room because of the harp space.

QUILTHER 02-15-2011 07:17 AM

When teaching my GD to sew I told her to keep her fingers out of the feed plate area to begin with. I was always nearby but locked my lips. A couple of small projects and it is more about her learning to trust her knowledge base. Teach her how to clean her machine. I used beginner color book pages (printed off the internet). for her to follow with out thread. There are a couple of good books out there for assistance. She even did an awesome job on a pillowcase.
Diane/Wyoming

lillybeck 02-15-2011 07:21 AM

Four of my GD's made doll quilts wile I was in NC over Christmas and they used my Janome that I took with me. If they are going to sew may as well learn it right. However. If I had an inexpesive machine I would probably have used that instead. Unlike many of you I only have the one. I will post pictures just as soon as I locate them.

Leota 02-15-2011 07:26 AM

If you can find a good feather weight machine it will last her forever and it sew slow enough for a young child. I would emphasize hand placement when sewing to decrease the chance of finger sewing ... I taught my granddaughter to sew when she was 4 years old on the sewing machine... she learned the safety rules first...
Has not sewn her fingers yet and she's 12.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:51 AM.



SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.