Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30

Thread: Pulling My HAIR OUT !!!!!!

  1. #1
    Member DesertNurse41's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Pa
    Posts
    57

    Pulling My HAIR OUT !!!!!!

    I just finished making (15) 8 point stars for this new pattern. They all looked good UNTIL I went to assemble the dang thing. the blocks ended up all wonky. I may have 5 that are useable. I'm stomping my feet and ready to spit. I took extra care with the cutting and sewing. Was so proud that I actually took great pains to make sure everything was accurate. So my questions is????? Do I start all over or put it down and come back later to try again? No idea what happened!!! But now am VERY discouraged. I havent been doing this that long, would say I'm an experienced newbie thanks for letting me vent. Hubby just gets a glass eyed look when I try to explain why I have tears in my eyes!!!
    Life's a dance, you learn as you go

  2. #2
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    18,361
    So sorry!!! I also consider myself an experienced newbie and I feel your pain. I think I would put it down for a while and regroup!! Might not be so bad when the head clears.

  3. #3
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    5,800
    Not even attempting to touch inset seams yet, but keep trying you'll get the hang of it. I think harriet hardgrave has a book on it I think its the senior year volume.
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

  4. #4
    Super Member faykilgore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    1,484
    Don't give up yet. Try spraying them lightly with water, blocking them and pressing them. Not sure what pattern you are doing, but sashing can cover a multitude of sins. Then there's always wonky blocks that are really fun. Post a pic and let us see the problem.
    Fay

    "You can't help that. We're all mad here." - The Cheshire Cat from Alice in Wonderland.

  5. #5
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Eastern Madera County, Ca
    Posts
    1,199
    Have a glass of wine. Tomorrow, ask a local friend to help. Or maybe there's a tutorial on the internet. Or maybe your LQS staff will help.

  6. #6
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    2,873
    Could you add a border around each one to minimize the mistakes?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Crosby,Texas
    Posts
    837
    A picture is worth a thousand hair pulls. Show us and we may be able to give an easy fix

  8. #8
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    10,792
    Blog Entries
    1
    Please post a pic of your blocks. If they are what I think they are I (and many others) can give you some pointers on getting the blocks to come out square.
    Joyce

    Four things you can't recover: The stone.....after the throw. The word......after its said. The occasion.....after its missed. The time......after its gone

  9. #9
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,734
    Blog Entries
    5
    Are they Flying Geese? My 8 point stars are Flying Geese, so I wondered if that is what you are talking about. They can get wonky.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  10. #10
    Senior Member giquilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Middle TN
    Posts
    885
    Blog Entries
    3
    Spray starch and up down pressing may help, this sort of blocks the stars.

  11. #11
    Junior Member QuiltnMyra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Southern NSW Australia
    Posts
    216
    Don't be discouraged DesertNurse. There are some great positives here. Firstly, let me say it happens to us all at the beginning. Here is your opportunity to start your 'Orphan Box' ... put the ones you really are unhappy with in there, believe me they will be used later for something else, call your disappointment a 'learning curve' and try again, the experience you gain with be well worth it. Enjoy your quilting and wipe away those tears. Hugs and good wishes,

    Mary B
    Mary B

  12. #12
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,892
    If you used Flying Geese sewn to a central square ... then I suggest you make some FG in different ways and see which best works for you.

    One central rectangle with 2 squares sewn at the corners.
    Sewing well starched triangles to a central isoscolese trapezoid. [ 2sides parallel, and the other sides equal in length, though not parallel.]
    Using a FG ruler - beware, there are many out there, so try before you buy.
    Paper Piecing: Triangles on a Roll has FG, as does a few other comapnies. Your LQS should have some.
    Triangulations, I think then also have FG. I haven't used these but some quilters love the program.

    Also do a 'net' search for Flying Geese. There are several tutes on the net, including John Flynn's method.
    Last edited by AliKat; 01-23-2013 at 10:20 PM.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  13. #13
    Super Member willferg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Northern California, Sonoma Co.
    Posts
    2,703
    I would put the blocks together, even if wonky. Years from now, you will look back and see how much progress you've made. Every quilt is a good quilt -- it doesn't have to be perfect!
    People who start projects and never finish them are cooler
    than people who never start projects at all.


    http://quiltingquick.weebly.com/blog.html

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    108
    Take a deep breath & repeat after me "design element, design element, design element" use them & be proud as you are probably your own worst critic

  15. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Central Pa
    Posts
    519
    I had the same complaint last week! lol I worked so hard to make the pattern even when cutting I couldn't figure out why it was so crooked when I started piecing them together! Then someone asked if I ironed instead of pressed. Ironing stretches the fabric. It really does! I'm pressing on the project I'm working on now and what a huge difference! Who would have thunk it? Don't know if this applies to you but it's worth a mention.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lived in San Diego now retired in Eagar, AZ.
    Posts
    861
    Blog Entries
    1
    i would suggest a 'custom' frame system... frame each block separately with either a matching fabric or different for each block to complement each block's colors... use a generous 2.5 or 3 inches... then after assembling... measure all to find the smallest block (they will be different because of each star's original size before framing. After you find the smallest one, trim all other to the same size, squaring up as you go... now they will all fit together perfectly and no one will be able to see the tiny difference from block to block... This is a method i often use when i find antique or stacks of unfinished blocks... you can make everything the same size without sacrificing any of the first round of work whether it's yours or someone elses'...good luck

  17. #17
    Senior Member klutzyquilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, Ca
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by willferg View Post
    I would put the blocks together, even if wonky. Years from now, you will look back and see how much progress you've made. Every quilt is a good quilt -- it doesn't have to be perfect!
    I agree with this suggestion. I made a Bonnie Hunter mystery quilt (think it was her first online) and I was very new to quilting. It is full of mistakes but from a distance it looks pretty and it keeps me warm (made it 1/2 size). Hand quilted it -- had no idea what I was doing but it was fun and I smile each time I look at it and realize all that is "wrong" with it. So glad I didn't "ditch" it.

    As QuiltnMyra says "Enjoy your quilting and wipe away those tears.."
    Learning something new everyday from all of you.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Posts
    25

    Smile Before you do anything more to your hair . . .

    . . . rest and see if you can figure what you did "wrong." With planning, you can join diamonds so those center seams are paired--one on grain, one bias. That helps.

    When you set in the squares/triangles between the diamonds, don't stitch past the dot. When you're in the middle of a seam, stop a stitch or two before before the dot and back stitch. When the seam is made, pull out any stitches that are in any of the seam allowances. At the outside edge of the block, the seams can be sewn from the raw edge (ignore "dot" rule).

    When you join the quarter units together, the center has to match then--you can't adjust when all 8 are together.

    If you decide to unstitch, do it by clipping the stitches from one side and pull the thread out from the other when it's loose. You don't want to pull on the edge of the patch and stretch it more out of shape.

    Press all the seams in the same direction, working around the center. They should marry to make matching easier.

    Use fine (.05) pins and fine (aurifil or similar) thread when lots of seam allowances meet. It helps keep the points crisp.
    If not now, when?

  19. #19
    Junior Member homebody323's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Rock Island, IL
    Posts
    296
    Blog Entries
    5
    Without seeing your blocks, it's impossible to tell for sure. The fact that you tried so hard leads me to believe that the issue is pressing. During assembly or final. check for folds pressed at the seams. The wonky statement says to me you ironed. When I run into a challenge like that I have a pressing board that i drew square sizes on with pigma pen. I will pin a block to the correct size and spray back with starch(before pinning) and press the front. Often all that is needed is to tell the block what is needed from it LOL
    Sally Dolin
    Rock Island, IL

  20. #20
    Super Member Caswews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Quilting, crocheting, sewing and crafting in my Sewing Room...Peaceful and wonderful !!
    Posts
    5,312
    Border around the "bad blocks"? spraying them ? Glass of wine and find information ?
    When Life brings big winds of change that almost blows you over.Hang on tight and Believe.
    Words and hearts should be handled with care-for words when spoken and hearts when broken are the hardest things to repair. Author unknown to me
    Do what you feel in your heart to be right; for you'll be criticized anyway-Eleanor Roosevelt

  21. #21
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,877
    I'd put the blocks away, and consider it "practice". Then get out some scrap fabric and practice those stars, or different ways of making an 8 pointed star ( and my personal preference is Ded Tucker's Lemoyne Star ruler from 180 designs. Works out perfectly every time!) and figure out where you went wrong. Maybe if you sent us a picture, it would help.

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Colonial Heights, VA
    Posts
    278
    I know how you feel. take a deep breath & spray starch it!
    marytp

  23. #23
    Senior Member leighway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    N. Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    706
    Quote Originally Posted by deemail View Post
    i would suggest a 'custom' frame system... frame each block separately with either a matching fabric or different for each block to complement each block's colors... use a generous 2.5 or 3 inches... then after assembling... measure all to find the smallest block (they will be different because of each star's original size before framing. After you find the smallest one, trim all other to the same size, squaring up as you go... now they will all fit together perfectly and no one will be able to see the tiny difference from block to block... This is a method i often use when i find antique or stacks of unfinished blocks... you can make everything the same size without sacrificing any of the first round of work whether it's yours or someone elses'...good luck
    This is a good idea. In the alternative, put the wonky ones aside, re-do your pattern to include simple squares and the star blocks that are good. Take the wonky ones and make the really wonky with framing and you'll end up with two quilts. Pictures would be great. We could really see what you're talking about.

  24. #24
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,522
    I would say to heavily starch and block them. If that doesn't square them up, add sashing. That will hide almost anything! Don't give up. You can do it!!!

  25. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Reston, VA
    Posts
    172
    Jinny Beyer does a lot of inset seams and stars. You might find somethig on her web site.

    My first attempt at stars turned out wonky, too. The problem started in the points of each star. To fix, do not sew to the end of the fabric. Instead, mark where the two seam lines intersect and only sew dot-to-dot. If you do this for both the stars and the insets, the wonk might be greatly improved.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.