Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 41 of 41

Thread: question for LA quilters and their customers

  1. #26
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    6,886
    I used to go to my LQS and rent time on their non-SR machine. I paid by the hour, no minimum time, but had to make an appointment. That was after taking their 5 hour class to learn their machine (Nolting, now Gammill).

    They also have a fully tricked out Gammill with Statler Stitcher that they use for custom quilting. They charge by size and work on that one, plus if someone wants a pattern they don't have, they share the cost with the client for the new (to the store) pattern for the Statler. They have a book with patterns that the store already has for the Statler as well as ones that can be ordered.

    The LQS near where I live now also does the same, but charges twice what I paid for rental with a 2 hour minimum.

    I am also one who likes to do the whole quilt from beginning to finished. Therefore, I am finally getting my own LA in about a week (Innova 26" w/ lightening stitch) and can't wait. We now have room for me to have a LA. I don't know if I will do a business, but will probably do a lot of charity work besides my own projects.

    Good luck with your plans.

  2. #27
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    i want to know if there is an airport close to the lady in washington state....have taken lessons on a mid arm and loved it....absolutly loved it, it was like dancing....but the instructor passed away and the shop is being sold and it was a 2 hour each way drive.

  3. #28
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by caspharm
    I used to go to my LQS and rent time on their non-SR machine. I paid by the hour, no minimum time, but had to make an appointment. That was after taking their 5 hour class to learn their machine (Nolting, now Gammill).

    They also have a fully tricked out Gammill with Statler Stitcher that they use for custom quilting. They charge by size and work on that one, plus if someone wants a pattern they don't have, they share the cost with the client for the new (to the store) pattern for the Statler. They have a book with patterns that the store already has for the Statler as well as ones that can be ordered.

    The LQS near where I live now also does the same, but charges twice what I paid for rental with a 2 hour minimum.

    I am also one who likes to do the whole quilt from beginning to finished. Therefore, I am finally getting my own LA in about a week (Innova 26" w/ lightening stitch) and can't wait. We now have room for me to have a LA. I don't know if I will do a business, but will probably do a lot of charity work besides my own projects.

    Good luck with your plans.
    is that at Nancy's.....i know the way there from the airport

  4. #29
    Super Member caspharm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    6,886
    No, it's Always Quilting in San Mateo for my old shop. Good people.

    The other is Quiltique in Henderson, NV. Also good people.

    I'm getting my LA from Teryl Loy in St George.


    Quote Originally Posted by SunlitenSmiles
    Quote Originally Posted by caspharm
    I used to go to my LQS and rent time on their non-SR machine. I paid by the hour, no minimum time, but had to make an appointment. That was after taking their 5 hour class to learn their machine (Nolting, now Gammill).

    They also have a fully tricked out Gammill with Statler Stitcher that they use for custom quilting. They charge by size and work on that one, plus if someone wants a pattern they don't have, they share the cost with the client for the new (to the store) pattern for the Statler. They have a book with patterns that the store already has for the Statler as well as ones that can be ordered.

    The LQS near where I live now also does the same, but charges twice what I paid for rental with a 2 hour minimum.

    I am also one who likes to do the whole quilt from beginning to finished. Therefore, I am finally getting my own LA in about a week (Innova 26" w/ lightening stitch) and can't wait. We now have room for me to have a LA. I don't know if I will do a business, but will probably do a lot of charity work besides my own projects.

    Good luck with your plans.
    is that at Nancy's.....i know the way there from the airport

  5. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    40
    Just to add my two cents as a LA quilter. Flat fee verses square inch fee- Not all quilts are created equal. I have quilted some quilts that the customer has called a double and it measured more in the king category. So if I charged according to "a double", I would lose money and time spent on the quilt. The square inch method of charging seems fairer to me cause no matter what size the customer thinks it is, I have a reasonable return for my labor and time. Like someone else said, I don't nickel and dime my customers to death. The end cost may reflect a small increase to the square inch figure for seaming backs and etc. My prices start at .0125 per inch for meandering and upward from there depending what the customer wants. Does this help?

  6. #31
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    10,612
    Blog Entries
    1
    I can never figure out what I'm going to pay. I know if it's custom I'm going to pay out the a--. One of the LQS will let you rent the LA'r but at $125 an hour and no experience I'd end up spending more.

  7. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    548
    Quote Originally Posted by Bottle Blonde
    I have been doing research about LA service prices. I am finding the majority of LA quilters charge by the inch, and this amount is subject to how dense the quilt is to be stitched. Such as .01 for open meander, .02 for medium, .03 for dense, .04 for custom designs, so forth and so on. Then there are extra charges such as $10 to seam the backing, $10 to square the quilt top, $30 to add borders, $8 to press the quilt top....(these are just rough amounts, I'm not quoting any professionals pricing here)

    Well, it all gets a little confusing, so this is my question. Do any LA quilters -- that you know of -- charge a flat hourly rate? If not, why not? If you are a quilter that hires LA service, would you rather pay an hourly rate? If so, why? if not, why not?

    Very few LA quilters charge a flat rate according to the size of the quilt. Is it unwise to charge ---- say $50 to LA quilt a crib size?

    I have come across a few LA machine owners that rent time on their machines. Do any of you do that? Is it profitable?

    Thanks for your help, I appreciate your comments. :)
    Just a few comments: All the longarm quilters that I know charge by the SQ Inch (not inch) LXW=Sq Inch. I know one lady who charges by the bobbin. Most longarm quilters do not charge by the flat rate. I don't because it is more difficult to figure out why/how to charge, (and explain it to my customer) when it is easier to just tell the customer what the rate is for the square inch. It is also difficult to keep an accurate accounting of the time it takes to quilt something, when charging by the hour, because of interruptions, etc.

    The reason for different prices (per sq inch) depends on the type and/or amount of quilting to be done. A longarm quilter would be (in a sense) paying you to quilt your quilt if she was to do custom quilting and only charge a flat rate or lower price that would be acceptable for doing a simple meandering price.

    Reasons for all the "extra charges" you are referring to, such as piecing the back, pressing, etc. is; these are very time comsuming tasks and your longarm quilter just wants to quilt your top and move on to another top to quilt. They do not want prepare the top (pressing, clipping threads) for quilting or finish the quilt, i.e. binding, unlelss they are paid for their time.

    It may sound like a lot of money to pay to have a top quilted, but longarm quilters are not getting rich off of their customers.

    Hope this helps. Ellen

  8. #33
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Odessa, Washington
    Posts
    1,907
    I do longarm quilting for others and I do charge by the inch. That said, I would not want to pay by the piece, i.e. $50.00 for a baby quilt, because I know the quilter would be hustling through the quilt, in git-r-dun mode, and I know I would not be happy. The only time I do charge by the hour is when I m doing ruler work - it is very slow process to get it lined up correctly compared to doing free-motion quilting!

  9. #34
    Super Member hcarpanini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    2,176
    I charge by the square inch. It takes time to load a quilt, choose thread and pattern. If I have a quilt that is 60x80 that is 4800 square inches. My base price is 1.8 cents per square inch. That quilt is $86.40. If I meander, it will take me about 20-30 minutes to load, time to wind bobbins and thread the machine. Meandering a quilt that size may take an hour and a half. I am now into this for 2+ hours. That also doesn't take into account trimming threads, and keeping the quilt straight as it rolls. Was the backing ironed before it came in? Was it pieced? I now have wear on my machine, electricity, and I don't charge for thread.
    How do you put a price on your time? This is the most stressfull yet most rewarding job I have ever had. What if the customer doesn't like what, did I choose the right color thread, and so on...
    Thats my two cents of how I charge!

  10. #35
    Senior Member allie1448's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Whitby, Ontario. British expat
    Posts
    643
    Blog Entries
    1
    I rent out time on my LA (HQ Avante) I offer a two hour lesson to get the new clients familiar with the machine and take them through as many of the different types of quilting as I can within that time. Customers can then rent the machine at an hourly rate. The time it takes them to quilt will depend on the type of quilting they want to do and the size of the quilt.
    I am not sure if we will ever be really profitable but the clients we have had so far love the service we offer, they get to complete their projects themselves, and I get to meet lovely people and can put some of the income we receive to offset the money we paid for the machine. Everyone wins!!!

  11. #36
    Senior Member allie1448's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Whitby, Ontario. British expat
    Posts
    643
    Blog Entries
    1
    Wow! That is a terrible hourly rate!!! Come to Canada and pay $15 per hour and I am happy to be on hand with advice and help all the time you are here! lol
    Quote Originally Posted by joyce888
    I can never figure out what I'm going to pay. I know if it's custom I'm going to pay out the a--. One of the LQS will let you rent the LA'r but at $125 an hour and no experience I'd end up spending more.

  12. #37
    Senior Member AnnaF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Hermon ME
    Posts
    684
    I have been a longarm quilter for seven yrs. I charge by the sq. inch. My prices vary according to what my client wants done on his/her quilt. Basically a loose meander would be $.01 per sq inch. Price would rise accordingly if more dense quilting is desired. Prices for pantograph work also varies according to density and complexity. Panto prices start @ $.0125 per, sq. inch. Custom work also is priced according to density and complexity of design. In general I typically charge $.03 - $.04 for dense custom quilting.
    I personally don't know of any quilters in my area that charge by the hour though there may well be some that do.
    On occasion I have rented time on my Gammill for people to quilt their own quilt but honestly don't have that many clients that wish to do that. I don't have a second machine or room to add one so don't picture myself doing a lot of renting.
    Another thing I do on occasion is to barter for services with a client. It's a win win situation for both myself and the client.

  13. #38
    Super Member pjnesler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rochester, Minnesota
    Posts
    1,794
    Blog Entries
    16
    Reading the posts so far, all of a sudden the beautuful work I've seen from Marilyn Badger came to mind - can you imagine how much one of her masterpieces must be worth in quilting labor alone?

  14. #39
    Super Member Just Me...'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,954
    When a LA quilter charges by the hour, how will they 'prove' to you that they spent XX hours on it? For estimate purposes, it seems much more tangible to quote by the inch. The reason for the 'other' charges you mention is that when you drop a quilt off to a longarmer, it is expected that the top and back are ready to go. If it creates extra work for them, then there are additional charges. There are some who don't like to piece their own backs, so we longarmers will do that for you, but not for free. :) Time is money in any industry. If we take time away from the actual quilting of the quilt, there are costs associated with that time.

  15. #40
    Bottle Blonde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    481
    A huge Thank You to everyone for sharing so much information in this discussion. I think it has helped clear up a lot of misunderstanding about how a professional determines their charges. I want to encourage everyone to have those unquilted tops finished up! There are so many options out there ---- from machine rental to bartering for LAQ service, and just about everything in between. Thanks!

  16. #41

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    609
    Bottle Blonde, I pay to have my quilts quilted. The lady charges .01 a square inch for an overall design. She charges more for custom work.
    I have rented machines at quilt stores and find that the hourly rate ($30) was not a good way for me to quilt. I was in a race to get as much done in the hour as I could. It wasn't a good way to learn how to quilt. I believe the quilting is an art.
    I hope to get my own LA within the next year, but it is still less expensive to have an experienced LAQ quilt my quilts. Eiltcoq.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.