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Thread: Quilt Basting Spray

  1. #1
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    Hi,
    I have a rather large quilt top (About 75 inches by 90) completed and am thinking about using quilt basting spray instead of large safety pins to attach it to the back and filling when I machine quilt it. Does anyone here have experience with this or have any suggestions? I have used the spray successfully on potholders.

  2. #2
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    I only use basting spray. I hate safety pins and I have used it on everything including a queen size quilt that sold for $1200.

    Rita

  3. #3
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    So, how do you use it? Do you baste the top to the filling first and then the backing and then quilt it? Does it ever shift when you are quilting it? Thanks for replying and by the way, my name is Rita also

  4. #4
    Senior Member judee0624's Avatar
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    You lay your backing down wrong side up, spray that. Lay your batting down and smooth it out. Spray that. Lay the top right side up and smooth it out. A queen size definitely needs 2 or more people to lay out all the layers. If you are using Sullivan's, be sure there is a lot of ventilation or do it outside. The other sprays are good inside. I particularly like 505 but I recently found 606 so need to try that.
    There is no shifting. The adhesive is really good as long as you have smoothed it out. I now have a bowl full of pins that are never used. Anyone out there want them?

    judee

  5. #5
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    Rita, what I do is lay out my backing, lay out my batting on top,fold the batting in half then in half the other direction. Spray batting with basting spray one section at a time. Then I lay out my quilt top and fold it also. check that there is enough backing hanging over all around before folding top. Set the top aside.
    Spray the batting in first section, lay down the top and smooth the first section.
    Spray section by section and unroll the top. I usually pin the edges then flip over and make sure there are no bumps, lumps,or wrinkles.

    The product I really like is iron on fusible batting. After quilting, wash and it is very soft. I find this product stay stuck down much better.

  6. #6
    Senior Member pam1966's Avatar
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    I just used basting spray for the first time on a quilt that measures about 72 x 102 (supposed to be the size for a twin bedspread).

    I put the backing down and tacked down all around the outside to make sure it was flat with no puckers. Then, with a window open slightly, I sprayed it with the basting spray. I then took the batting and laid it on top. I was afraid that it would stick too much and I wouldn't be able to adjust it, but it did really well. When I got the batting smooth, I sprayed it and did the quilt top.

    One thing- when you spray, have an extra piece of material for the edges- makes it easier than cleaning excess spray off your floor (I was on carpet so I really wanted to prevent that).

    I love quilt basting spray now, and I don't think I will EVER go back to pinning. So much quicker and easier, and I don't have all those safety pins in my way when I'm quilting.

  7. #7
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I love using the basting spray and that is the only way I baste my quilts now. I have made at least a dozen large queen size quilts that I spray basted. I have the wonderful option of going to our church ( basically down the street and across) and pushing tables together so I don't have to get down on the floor.
    I also have Dh and another friend well trained in how to do it. Last night we did 4 quilts in less than an hour, including cutting the batting to size.

  8. #8
    Super Member janRN's Avatar
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    Does the basting spray only work on cotton batting or does it also work on poly batting? I have both types of batting in my stash. Thanks.

  9. #9
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    Do you spray baste quilts for hand quilting also, or just for machine quilting? Thanks.

  10. #10
    ToucanSam's Avatar
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    I'm a newbie quilted, this sounds neat! Never heard of it but will look into it now.

  11. #11
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janRN
    Does the basting spray only work on cotton batting or does it also work on poly batting? I have both types of batting in my stash. Thanks.
    It is supposed to work best on cotton batting (or 80/20 batting). I don't think I've seen anyone complain that basting spray with cotton batting didn't work well.

    Some people have said they had problems with it sticking to poly batting; however, many have also posted that they have had no problems using basting spray with poly batting. It may depend somewhat on which basting spray is used; I'm not sure if it's that, or if poly needs extra basting spray, or if people simply vary in the amounts they spray on.

    I think it's a good idea, after spray basting a large quilt, to also pin the edges all around the perimeter. This is not necessary on lap size quilts.

  12. #12
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I use basting spray on all types of batting and have done well. I love it and like it better than pinning.

  13. #13
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    Spray basting makes hand quilting difficult. I think machine quilting is it's best use. Also I don't like the stuff from Joann's. The 505 is my favorite but I have not tried 606.

    Rita

  14. #14
    FinelyFabricated's Avatar
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    I make wall quilts and table runners mostly I use sulky 2000 and it doesn't keep things from shifting on my quilts so I use straight pins as well and spray a section at a time.

    I only use white and wonderful or warm and wonderful quilt battings.

    I haven't found a spray I really like. The sulky at least I can use indoors. I quilt mostly in the winter and I'm not going out doors to use some of the other sprays that hold better.

    505 bothers my lungs; I'm an asthmatic. Many people say it doesn't bother them.

    I also have June Tailor's spray and hate the fumes though it works better.

  15. #15
    Senior Member foxxigrani's Avatar
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    Well a bunch of Rita's here I am also Rita. I probably wouldn't have even opened my mouth since I have never used it before but the Rita's got me. lol. I plan on using it, do have a can of 505 I believe. But have been to chicken to use it. I know get out of the hen house and get on the roof, I can do this. Thanks Rita's for the advice.

    Rita S.

  16. #16
    Super Member judy_68's Avatar
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    I use the spray and love it but I also pin it. I haven't been brave enough to use the spray alone. I had soooo much trouble keeping the layers together. I love the spray.. I want to try the hair spray too.
    Judy in Ohio

  17. #17
    Senior Member Loretta's Avatar
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    It would probably be benificial to use a mask when using any spray adhesive.

  18. #18
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    I'm new to quilting as well but I am TOTALLY sold on spray basting. Fast,easy and there is never a shift when I free motion quilt my efforts. I use my kitchen floor, tape the backing down, throw my batting in the dryer for 15 min. to decrease the folds, roll up quantity needed, and start spraying(I use 505) and unrolling the batting on top of the backing. Next I roll up my quilt top, place it at the bottom and start spraying, rolling and smoothing out the creases as I go. It's really easy and works well for me. I cannot imagine PINS...I'd DIE!

  19. #19
    Senior Member quiltin-nannie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by judy_68 View Post
    I use the spray and love it but I also pin it. I haven't been brave enough to use the spray alone. I had soooo much trouble keeping the layers together. I love the spray.. I want to try the hair spray too.
    Judy in Ohio
    Hair Spray???
    Julie
    Good friends are like stars; you don't always see them, but you know they're always there!

  20. #20
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    Give the glue (Elmers washable school glue) basting method a try....so cheap, easy, no fumes, no overspray to clean up and washes out completely with warm water/soap.

  21. #21
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    I used spray with cotton batting, but I needed help from my husband. We laid out the backing and the batting, then rolled the backing towards the middle of the quilt and started spraying/smoothing in sections. It took us a while since the batting was a little difficult to work with, but once it was done it was very secure. It probably took us an hour to do it, but I think maybe next time it'd go faster since we're familiar with the process now.

  22. #22
    Super Member charsuewilson's Avatar
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    I've used it, and really like the way it binds the fabric and batting together. I have Sullivans. It really stinks. I first used it inside in the kitchen at the bar. The overspray was awful. I had sticky overspray on my counter, on my floor, that took 6 mo to a year to remove. Since then, I've used it on portable tables over carpeted surfaces and outside on my deck.

    I like it because I tend to get tucks on the backside of my quilt when I pin baste it. With the spray, I haven't had any tucks on the back of the quilt from quilting.

    I've used the Sulky spray for machine embroidery. I don't remember any smell from that.

  23. #23
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    I have used 505, but after trying out the Elmer's School Glue I'll never go back. DH and I try to eat really healthy foods and avoid cleaning supplies that chock us up (I'm especially allergic to flowers, perfumes, caustic cleansers, etc.) and I was scared to death to use 505. I opened windows on both ends of the room and even put a fan blowing out the down-wind window! It did OK, but I was not comfortable.

    With Elmer's School Glue I can make a thin series of "S" curves from center outward in each quarter of the quilt w/o any dangers fumes. I can lift it if a winkle occurs (not a frequent problem) and replace. When I'm done with all four quarters I turn it over and glue the other side. It is faster (no need for fans and surgical mask), it is environmentally safe, it allows for quick adjustment if a section has a wrinkle, it can be made "permanent" by briefly ironing (or simply leaving it for awhile), the sewing machine has no problem with going over the glue (I even really overglued my first time and still no problem sewing over the glue), I can make last minute adjustments (did this once early on) by wetting the area and letting it dry and redoing it, use more Elmer's School on the binding (what a help!!!) and when all it done put it in the washer on gentle and clean it for gifting.... with no glue left. People on QB say it isn't really glue, more like the rice and water glue Asians use. Whatever, it is healthy, environmentally safe, and VERY inexpensive. And no pins to catch on my shirts and make awful little holes!!!
    Last edited by Sierra; 04-06-2013 at 08:36 AM.

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