Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 28

Thread: Quilt clappers

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New to Manchester New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,588

    Quilt clappers

    Has anyone tried these and if so do you like it and does it make a difference in your seams. Thank you Denise
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 11-01-2018 at 02:23 AM. Reason: shouting/all caps
    Denise finally in Manchester NH

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    The Deep South near Cajun Country, USA
    Posts
    4,060
    Never used one. I almost always iron my seams to the side so that they nest when I join the blocks or pieces within the blocks. They are never totally flat, but that isn't a problem for me.
    Sew a Little, Love a Lot & Live like you were dying!

  3. #3
    Super Member cashs_mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    6,226
    Tailor's clappers have been used for years to flatten seams. I used to use them often when I was doing tailoring. My suits always had beautiful shoulders that laid perfectly flat.
    Patrice S

    Bernina Artista 180, Singer 301a, Featherweight Centennial, Rocketeer, Juki 2200 QVP Mini, White 1964 Featherweight

  4. #4
    Super Member Ariannaquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    in the sticks of PA
    Posts
    2,009
    Love using it for garments sewing and when I first started quilting 25+ years ago I I was taught to open my seams so there I did use it and had perfectly flat seams. Sadly I loaned it to a friend who passed away and her family disposed of it!
    Maria
    Always be true to yourself!

  5. #5
    Junior Member AmyBible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    139
    Quote Originally Posted by harvsstuff View Post
    Has anyone tried these and if so do you like it and does it make a difference in your seams. Thank you Denise
    I love mine, especially the square one. In addition to many of Bonnie's mysteries I do a lot of my own small scrap piecing and the clapper really helps get the blocks flat. The oblong one is good for flippy corners as well as longer seams.

    You have to use a steam iron or spray bottle and dry iron. The hard wood holds the heat and flattens the seams; the longer you leave it on the flatter... usually about 10-15 seconds.

    Name:  z post1.jpg
Views: 1335
Size:  105.8 KB Name:  z post2.jpg
Views: 1333
Size:  102.3 KB

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    662
    Thanks AmyBible. I’m convinced to get one now.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    11,202
    I have the long one with handle. I took a precision piecing class and the instructor told us put the iron on a seam leave it there for at least 30 seconds, take off the iron and put a ruler the size of the piece on top, put a book on top of that and let is set for up to 10 min or more until completely cool. Of course she made national quilt show quilts and it showed.

    I use a thick wood cutting board for big blocks.
    Last edited by Onebyone; 11-01-2018 at 05:04 AM.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

  8. #8
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    SW Washington USA
    Posts
    3,406
    I think this process is being repeated in the wool pressing sheets now popular.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    697
    I bought one, but it was delivered while I'm out of town. I'm looking forward to using it!

  10. #10
    Junior Member recycler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    266
    I was wondering also if anyone uses them in quilting! I've been researching them and had my DH make me one, but then his router broke and he wasn't able to make the grove in the sides (mine will be oblong) so it screeched to a halt. I'm going to nab it from his shop and start using it!

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    NY Adirondacks in Summer and goes "South" to WNY in the winter!
    Posts
    298
    Love mine!

  12. #12
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    34,717
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb in Louisiana View Post
    Never used one. I almost always iron my seams to the side so that they nest when I join the blocks or pieces within the blocks. They are never totally flat, but that isn't a problem for me.
    This is what I do too. Easiest way for me to make the intersections line up.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    284
    I used them on the seams of my last quilt and my longarmer mentioned how flat the seams were....so I guess they work as intended.

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,511
    Additionally are the wooden strips to place the seam over and press. Can't think of what those are called but they are essentially a 1/2 round cut into desired lengths. I like that it keeps my seam straight while pressing open.

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Manteno, IL
    Posts
    1,615
    My DH made me one...I do like the way they work!

  16. #16
    Super Member osewme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,893
    I've heard that they work very well. Here are some sites that show you how to make your own if you work with wood.

    https://www.google.com/search?client...13.4hMpRJ9CjO0

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Conroe, TX
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by illinois View Post
    Additionally are the wooden strips to place the seam over and press. Can't think of what those are called but they are essentially a 1/2 round cut into desired lengths. I like that it keeps my seam straight while pressing open.
    These are called Strip sticks. I don't often press my seams open, but when I do I love how these help.
    An Amish quilt shop did a demonstration of these for our sewing group when we took a bus trip to their shop.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    714
    Love mine. It works especially well with the wool pressing mat. Making strip sets lay flat is much easier with it.

  19. #19
    Super Member Darcyshannon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,860
    I will need to look into this.

  20. #20
    Super Member Darcyshannon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,860
    Quote Originally Posted by Onebyone View Post
    I have the long one with handle. I took a precision piecing class and the instructor told us put the iron on a seam leave it there for at least 30 seconds, take off the iron and put a ruler the size of the piece on top, put a book on top of that and let is set for up to 10 min or more until completely cool. Of course she made national quilt show quilts and it showed.

    I use a thick wood cutting board for big blocks.
    Letting it completely cool is important. It is what blocks the fiber.

  21. #21
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New to Manchester New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,588
    THANK you very much for the info I will ask my son to make me one.

  22. #22
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    East Arkansas
    Posts
    2,478
    Blog Entries
    3
    I just went over to my son in laws scrap wood pile and picked up a piece of 2x4 and cleaned it. Cost zero. Doesn't have routed sides but works just the same.
    TwandasMom

  23. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    150
    My husband is a woodworker. Does anyone have plans, or a resource, for making a clapper? I know I can google it but he asked if someone has found specific instructions that they like that a woodworker would use.... Thanks in advance.

  24. #24
    Junior Member recycler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    266
    The one my DH made is 8"long, 2.5" wide on one end, tapering to about 2" on the other, and 1.5 or so " high. The ends are rounded. As someone mentioned earlier, you could basically grab a hunk of wood out of his scrap pileand use it, but you would want it sanded nicely. Think about what size blocks you normally make and adjust the length accordingly. Mine is a little short, so I will have him make another that is about 12" long.

  25. #25
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    11,202
    I do know the wood has to be certain type of wood, solid hard wood, no slivers, not pine. My DH does woodworking and said it costs about the same to make one as to buy one unless you already have the wood as scrap.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
    Being cheap is not a badge of honor.
    My heroes are working people, paying their own way, taking care of their children and being decent human beings.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.