Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 47 of 47

Thread: Quilt Cleaning Cigarette Smoke Odor -- NEED ADVICE!!!

  1. #26
    Member dredick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    13
    Would you consider Fabreeze? Can't hurt.

  2. #27
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New York City/Manhattan
    Posts
    1,324
    also, I would never store anything I valued in plastic because it can hasten fabric rot and destruction. It does not breathe!

  3. #28
    Super Member Edie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    2,619
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose View Post
    Use your regular detergent and wash it on delicate. Turn the washer off and let it soak for a while before it agitates. You may want drain off that water and wash it in fresh water if the smell is really bad. I'd be careful of too many additives, though some white vinegar might be okay. I would spin it on normal to remove as much water as possible, then dry it in the dryer until damp, then lay it out. I wash a 50 year old quilt totally handmade that way.
    Maybe wait until it is a little warmer out and you can hang it to dry on a line in the shade. We get shade part of the afternoon and I hang my quilts out then and let them flop in the breeze - they smell so good too. Edie
    Home is where the rags of your life are turned into quilts, lemons become lemonade and a few extra pounds are simply welcomed as "more of you to love."
    I am so confused. I don't know if I found a rope or lost my horse."

    BELIEVE

  4. #29
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Long island, Ny
    Posts
    242
    Blog Entries
    1
    use vinegar with your detergent

  5. #30
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,665
    I have the front loader washer/dryer. It has a hand wash feature and they work wonderful and are very gentle. I have washed many "old/antique/vintage quilts with o damage. Oxy-Clean and mild detergent. Dry on delicate until just damp, lay sheet over balcony, hand to full dry, several days!!
    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
    Done is better than perfect.

  6. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    412
    A friend of mine lost her house to a fire (neighbor's fire works) and they lost almost everything. The few items, including a piece or two of furniture wreaked of smoke. They rented an ozone machine and placed it and the smelly items in a sealed room. Worked like a charm. If you still have that smell after washing, perhaps you can find a company that does this on small items. I doubt it would be very costly.

  7. #32
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,923
    Blog Entries
    1
    if it has been stored in plastic, and smells of cigarette smoke, it is NOT perfect...there is damage you can not see with the naked eye, but it is there!

    Check out this site! http://www.quilthistory.com/
    But fresh air and sunlight are the best and easiest way to remove the odors. Just lie outside with a sheet over the top to keep the sun off of it!

  8. #33
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1

    Removing Cigarette Smoke

    I have successfully removed cigarette odor from fabric with Febreeze and ammonia. My father in law was a heavy smoker and every time we visited our hair and clothing just reeked, ick! He also had a log home and Febreeze removed 20 years of cigarette odor from the very porous walls.

    With Febreeze, I hung my quilt from the clothesline and sprayed both sides then let it air for several hours. A second application may be necessary. I haven't had any troubel with Febreeze staining or discoloring anything, but you might wish to test it on a small section before doign the entire quilt.

    The other method that's been successful is to throw a half cup of ammonia into the washing machine with the fabric. I'd be terrified to try this on an antique quilt, but for fabric I get at yard sales (and have not yet formed a personal attachment) this works. This also works if your husband and sons went fishing and wiped their stinky hands on their jeans.

    Best of luck!

  9. #34
    Senior Member CarrieC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    818
    I've had some luck with curtains in this condition. I washed them with white vinegar, rinsed them with vinegar and then hung them up with air circulating. I repeated this several times until I was satisfied - PS after I got rid of the nicotine I washed them with soap and water like normal to get rid of the vinegar smell.
    Carrie, Queen of the Seam Rippers!

  10. #35
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    North Manchester, IN
    Posts
    169
    Quote Originally Posted by Sallyflymi View Post
    Hotels use dryer sheets in a/c to remove smell. Use 6 or 7 dryer sheets I would try putting the quilt in dryer on low setting and tumble for a 1/2 hour and see what happens.
    If you put it in the dryer without washing first I would suggest using an air/fluff setting only not heat.

  11. #36
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    83
    if it is in very good condition then there is nothing wrong with putting quilt in washing machine with a little oxyclean...let it soak for about thirty minutes, spin and drain. then run normal wash cycle with no detergent and then when finished put it in the clothes dryer unless you are afraid of it shrinking badly. i make and sell quilts and most of what i make have alot of handwork etc... before the quilt is sold, i do a good wash and dry of the quilt-it is like a final test to see if what i produce will hold up. i do use a color catcher in the wash load just in case of colors running. this should take out cigarette/cigar smoke smell as well as discoloration from the smoke...also, do not ever store a quilt in plastic...use a cotton pillowcase or two and refold quilt every now and then.

  12. #37
    Senior Member GlitzyMe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Boston - Orlando
    Posts
    471
    My mother had a Bates George Washington bedspread that had never been used. It was in the original box wrapped in tissue paper for over 40 years. She gave it to me (still in the box) a couple years ago and when I opened it, the tobacco stench was horrible. Into the front loading washer it went with detergent. I put it thru one complete cycle then started the washer again and added a hefty dose of white vinegar. Twice. Then I washed it again with detergent and dried it. Finally got the smell out. I did not put it in the dryer until I couldn't detect any odor at all when it was wet. I had the thought that if I dried it before I was sure, the odor would be locked in. I had asked her for this bedspread back in the early 70s but she was one of those people who had to 'own' even tho they don't take care of things. It's lovely now and takes it's turn on our bed.
    Chris
    Third star to the right and straight on til morning.....

  13. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    413
    Here is another tip. I tried this with a suitcase that my athlete daughter used when she was gone to a week long vollebyall camp. Needless to say all sweaty gym clothes were thrown in the suitcase and then she did not immediately unpack an wash when she came home. So the suitcase had a funky gym oder. I took a clean wash cloth and soaked it in Febreze and place in the suit case and closed it. When I opened the suitcase to use a few weeks later, it smell fresh.

    You could try something like this by placing the quilt and a wash cloth soaked in febreze into a basket or box and see what happens. I probably wouldn't put it in a container that is air tight (rubbermaid or zip lock bag) because the dampness on from the Febreze might develop into mildew.

  14. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Cedar Hill, TX
    Posts
    430
    Sending a quilt to the dry cleaners is saying goodby. They always have and excuse why it disappeared.

  15. #40
    Senior Member collady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Batesville, Arkansas
    Posts
    853
    Don't ever dry clean a quilt! The chemicals that are used in dry cleaning may not be totally removed, and they can damage the fabrics over time. Also once something has been dry cleaned, it should not be home washed. Just wash it with your regular detergent and white vinegar. I have a quilt that is over 100 years old and washed it that way years ago. It survived.

  16. #41
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Littlefield, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,088
    I would suggest you get it quilted first. No matter how secure it looks, the seams will fray and some will come apart. Once quilted you can try the washing methods given.
    Marge


    Quote Originally Posted by greatscott View Post
    My mother gave me a hand-made quilt 15 years ago. It has been stored in plastic and is in excellent condition except that it has a heavy nicotine/cigarette smell.

    I need to decide between airing it out, machine washing cold on delicate cycle, hand washing in cold water with mild detergent and then laying it out on towels or blankets, or taking it to a dry cleaner.

    I'm afraid to lay it out in the sun in case that might damage it. And I do not know if dry cleaners would care for it properly or be able to get the smell out.

    Thanks in advance for any advice or help you can offer.
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot automated quilter
    http://www.Lmcampbel.com

  17. #42
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,929
    I would highly recommend airing it out for several days, or possibly a couple of weeks in the shade before washing it. If you have a covered patio or a space where you could lay it out, or hang it, so the sun doesn't touch it, it should take the smell out, then I would wash it for sure.

  18. #43
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bacliff, TX on Galveston Bay
    Posts
    1,168
    I agree with soaking in a large tub of wash water with soda, vinegar and mild detergent. Dry in the dryer with a dryer sheet. Do NOT store in a plastic bag! Store in a closet on a hanger or in a large pillowcase. I have a glass and oak storage box that shows the quilts and keeps them safe.

  19. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    362
    Blog Entries
    3
    Oxyclean faded a quilt for me. I will not use it again on antique quilts or any quilts for that matter.
    Donna Quilts
    We help the wounded soldiers.

  20. #45
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,065
    Blog Entries
    20
    You might also try some baking soda in your wash water. Hope one of the suggestions on here works for you. Good luck.
    Vonda-Texas MiMi of 4 Beautiful Grandbabies

  21. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1
    DO NOT USE OXICLEAN - I've seen it destroy fabric with holes or turn it yellow.

  22. #47
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,431
    My husband smokes. This is how I wash quilts. It may be a bit of work but I have not broken a seam yet. Knock wood.
    I line my bathtub with a clean, unfolded, white sheet. I fill the tub full enough of cool water to cover the sheet and the quilt I'm going to wash, then add 1/2 cup of sudsy ammonia to the water. I put the quilt in the tub getting it completely wet. I'll add more water if needed so I can 'swish' the quilt in the water. Once the quilt is wet I'll let it soak for about 10 minutes then I'll drain the tub. Once the water has drained I'll refill the tub with cool water to rinse. I usually do 2 complete rinses or until the water is clear. Once I'm done rinsing I press as much excess water out of the quilt as possible then I get one side of the sheet even with a side of the quilt and gently roll the quilt and sheet together 'jelly roll' style, all the while gently pressing water from the roll. Once I have as much water out of it as possible I hang it over 2 clothes lines. I carefully unroll one end and attach the sheet to the clothes line. I then unroll the rest of the quilt/sheet to attach the other side of the sheet to the other line, making a hammock to support the quilt, I spread the quilt out in the sheet as much as possible. As more water drains off, I spread the quilt out and fluff it periodically until it is dry.

    If you have someone to help hang it, it is an easy job, otherwise plan on getting wet.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.