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Thread: Quilt as you go

  1. #1
    Senior Member Lucky Lady's Avatar
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    Red face Quilt as you go

    I am making my first queen size quilt using the quilt as you go method. I have my squares done and am ready to sandwich and start the quilting process. I am wondering if any of you would be willing to share photos of quilts you have done using the QAYG method. It would be so helpful and maybe give me some ideas on how to do the actual quilting. Thanks so much!!


    Lucy

  2. #2
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    You have to leave 1/2inch all the way-around the edge and after joining I nearly always quilt over or finish Off.

    The first is just joiningat1/4inch all round. The second. Is the one I'm working on . With this I put the sashing on before doing the cross hatching. I had quilted the circle area in each.
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Last edited by DOTTYMO; 05-01-2013 at 09:25 AM.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  3. #3
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    Some day I need to try the QAYG - these quilts are beautiful.

  4. #4
    Super Member grma33's Avatar
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    just watched a great video from the gourmet quilter which I found to be the best information Gale

  5. #5
    Junior Member mimmy96's Avatar
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    I am interested in this post as well!!

  6. #6
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    I did this one a couple of years ago.
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  7. #7
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    I'm still working on this one - I've got 4 rows finished and it is making a queen sized quilt. I'm really liking the QAYG method because it is easier to handle the quilt.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Lucky Lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ranchwife View Post
    I'm still working on this one - I've got 4 rows finished and it is making a queen sized quilt. I'm really liking the QAYG method because it is easier to handle the quilt.
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    How are you joining your rows? Love the colors in this!

  9. #9
    Junior Member QuiltnMyra's Avatar
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    Was really pleased to see this thread come up and all the piccies in reply. I am also planning to try this method again. I did one years ago and hated it - the method I used then was very awkward. Since then I've seen several more ways to do it and am very interested in how you have all put yours together. Thank you Lucky Lady for putting up this thread.
    Mary B

  10. #10
    Junior Member narnianquilter's Avatar
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    I sandwich each block individually, making the backing about an inch or two larger than the block itself. Then you quilt. Once you get them quilted, place the backings of your blocks right side together and sew a straight seam. That will leave you with two pieces sticking out that you can fold over the unfinished edge of the block and stitch in place! I hope that makes sense...I am getting ready to start a new one here in a few days. I will try and post some pics then!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucky Lady View Post
    How are you joining your rows? Love the colors in this!
    The backing on each block is 1/2 inch larger all around than the top. I then quilt the squares. To join them, I sew two block tops together, press the seam to one side (I invested in a small hand held iron to do this), then lay the batting flat so that one side overlaps the other. On the side that overlaps, I trim the batting so that the two pieces lay flush against each other and then add heat set batting tape. Then, fold one side of backing over the batting, mark the center fold line, and fold the other side of backing down to the line. I set it with the iron and glue baste it in place. From there, I hand stitch the seams closed. The back looks great and I'm pleased with this method. The original instructions had you SID the backing closed, but this only works when joining two blocks. When you add the next row, you don't have the seam allowances to work with, so SID was not an option. I hope this makes sense. I can post a picture tutorial if you would like since I'm joining blocks tonight.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativetexan View Post
    I did this one a couple of years ago.
    I really like the one square with the block on it, how good is that? Love it. Nice job, heck they are all wonderful. And the technique is interesting to me, I have my blocks done for a queen size and have thought about this. Thanks for sharing wonderful photos everyone.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ranchwife View Post
    The backing on each block is 1/2 inch larger all around than the top. I then quilt the squares. To join them, I sew two block tops together, press the seam to one side (I invested in a small hand held iron to do this), then lay the batting flat so that one side overlaps the other. On the side that overlaps, I trim the batting so that the two pieces lay flush against each other and then add heat set batting tape. Then, fold one side of backing over the batting, mark the center fold line, and fold the other side of backing down to the line. I set it with the iron and glue baste it in place. From there, I hand stitch the seams closed. The back looks great and I'm pleased with this method. The original instructions had you SID the backing closed, but this only works when joining two blocks. When you add the next row, you don't have the seam allowances to work with, so SID was not an option. I hope this makes sense. I can post a picture tutorial if you would like since I'm joining blocks tonight.
    Your method looks like I could do that, and it would be easier, except when you get down to the last few rows, I did the Cotton method, I really like it, it is courthouse steps, the strips are so heavily quilted it is very stiff. I like how it looked so might try this way out. I have to dig out my instructions and see how they compare. It sounds very similar.
    Thanks!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Lucky Lady's Avatar
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    Wink Quilt as you go

    Quote Originally Posted by Ranchwife View Post
    The backing on each block is 1/2 inch larger all around than the top. I then quilt the squares. To join them, I sew two block tops together, press the seam to one side (I invested in a small hand held iron to do this), then lay the batting flat so that one side overlaps the other. On the side that overlaps, I trim the batting so that the two pieces lay flush against each other and then add heat set batting tape. Then, fold one side of backing over the batting, mark the center fold line, and fold the other side of backing down to the line. I set it with the iron and glue baste it in place. From there, I hand stitch the seams closed. The back looks great and I'm pleased with this method. The original instructions had you SID the backing closed, but this only works when joining two blocks. When you add the next row, you don't have the seam allowances to work with, so SID was not an option. I hope this makes sense. I can post a picture tutorial if you would like since I'm joining blocks tonight.
    If you could post a picture tutorial that would be wonderful. Can't wait to see a picture of this quilt when you have it finished. I absolutely love the colors you chose.

    Lucy

  15. #15
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    1. Pin the front of each block at the edge of the previous seam to prevent the blocks from slipping when you sew them together.
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    2. Press the seam how you wish. I use a tiny iron to do this and it works great.
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    3. Fold the batting so it overlaps and trim to it butts up against each other. The fabric looks wet because it is. I glue basted the sandwich together so I could quilt it and got the glue too close to the edge. A little water loosened the glue right up and I was able to separate the backing and batting. Just make sure not to quilt within about 1 inch of the edge of the top square. Makes it easier to so this process.
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    4. I used heat press batting tape to join the batting at this point.
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    5. Fold the fabric down and mark the fold line on the bottom fabric.
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    6. Fold the top fabric under to the line and press. I trim my seams to about 3/8 inch at this point. Then glue baste the seam shut. I hand stitch the seams closed at this point.
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    Hope this clarifies things for you!

  16. #16
    Senior Member humbird's Avatar
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    Very nice tute. That is exactly how I GAYG, except I stitch the batting together. Don't think they had batting tape eons ago when I did my 1st one. Your Log Cabin is beautiful by the way.

  17. #17
    Senior Member QuiltingHaven's Avatar
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    Smile Quilt As you Go

    Here is my "Quilt As You Go". I quilted the squares riding in the car with my husband to and from Wichita, KS from Ohio. I put it all together when I got home. It is Queen size but I have it on the regular bed.
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    Busy in Ohio

  18. #18
    Senior Member DeneK's Avatar
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    Here is my QAYG -- southern parisol ladies I did for my DIL -- king size
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    Last edited by DeneK; 05-02-2013 at 06:40 PM. Reason: adding pic

  19. #19
    Senior Member Lucky Lady's Avatar
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    Thank you so much. Excellent explanation.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ranchwife View Post
    1. Pin the front of each block at the edge of the previous seam to prevent the blocks from slipping when you sew them together.
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 750
Size:  205.8 KB

    2. Press the seam how you wish. I use a tiny iron to do this and it works great.
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 797
Size:  258.7 KB

    3. Fold the batting so it overlaps and trim to it butts up against each other. The fabric looks wet because it is. I glue basted the sandwich together so I could quilt it and got the glue too close to the edge. A little water loosened the glue right up and I was able to separate the backing and batting. Just make sure not to quilt within about 1 inch of the edge of the top square. Makes it easier to so this process.
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 716
Size:  236.5 KB

    4. I used heat press batting tape to join the batting at this point.
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 741
Size:  213.7 KB

    5. Fold the fabric down and mark the fold line on the bottom fabric.
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 725
Size:  229.6 KB

    6. Fold the top fabric under to the line and press. I trim my seams to about 3/8 inch at this point. Then glue baste the seam shut. I hand stitch the seams closed at this point.
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 728
Size:  287.0 KB

    Hope this clarifies things for you!

  20. #20
    Senior Member Lucky Lady's Avatar
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    Beautiful


    Quote Originally Posted by DeneK View Post
    Here is my QAYG -- southern parisol ladies I did for my DIL -- king size

  21. #21
    Senior Member Lucky Lady's Avatar
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    Love it!! You did a great job!

    Lucy

    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltingHaven View Post
    Here is my "Quilt As You Go". I quilted the squares riding in the car with my husband to and from Wichita, KS from Ohio. I put it all together when I got home. It is Queen size but I have it on the regular bed.

  22. #22
    Super Member gardnergal970's Avatar
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    I started using QAYG earlier this year and love it. It's worth the time to learn the process and there are more than one way to do it. Experiment with some orphan blocks to see what works for you and go for it. Under the challenge section here in QB there is a thread for orphan blocks that has a couple if methods too. That's where I started.

  23. #23
    Junior Member SandyQuilter's Avatar
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    Quilt As You Go

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucky Lady View Post
    I am making my first queen size quilt using the quilt as you go method. I have my squares done and am ready to sandwich and start the quilting process. I am wondering if any of you would be willing to share photos of quilts you have done using the QAYG method. It would be so helpful and maybe give me some ideas on how to do the actual quilting. Thanks so much!!


    Lucy
    Lucy:
    Please, please do not do quilt as you go in individual blocks. It's an absolute crazy maker trying to join four quilted corners together, especially on the back. That is the reason I wrote my first book, Quilt-As-You-Go, back in 1983 and its second edition 5 years later. All told, the books were in print for 15 years and my method got rave reviews. Instead, sew the blocks into long strips. For instance, if the quilt is 4 x 5 blocks, sew 4 strips of five blocks. Cut the batt the same size and the backing slightly larger. Baste together as normal. You can quilt it in a frame similar to a needlepoint frame, rolling the quilt as you go. Start in the center of the strip to quilt and go to one end, then roll back to the center and quilt to the other end. The only accommodation you need to make is stop quilting inch from the joining seams. Leave threads hanging so that the quilting can be hand finished, or tied off and machine quilted. When two strips are quilted, join the top as you would normally, then butt the batting edges together so they lay flat (trim if necessary) and whip stitch with a loose tension and white thread (you don't have to outline quilt). The final step is to lay one side of the backing flat, lay the adjoining backing edge over it, fold the raw edge under, trim if necessary and hand stitch the edges down, catching into the batt, but not the top. The final step is to finish the quilting over the seam lines.

    The ONLY difference with this type of assembly is that you have seams where every strip is joined, but you usually have back joining seams anyway. From the top, the quilt is identical. And you have a portable project that joins with straight seams--no matching corners. Even machine quilting can be done with this method. No forcing a large quilt through a small machine throat.

    Good luck.
    SandyQuilter

  24. #24
    Super Member sniktasemaj's Avatar
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    Please post the pictorial tutorial. It would be great if you could share this technique.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ranchwife View Post
    The backing on each block is 1/2 inch larger all around than the top. I then quilt the squares. To join them, I sew two block tops together, press the seam to one side (I invested in a small hand held iron to do this), then lay the batting flat so that one side overlaps the other. On the side that overlaps, I trim the batting so that the two pieces lay flush against each other and then add heat set batting tape. Then, fold one side of backing over the batting, mark the center fold line, and fold the other side of backing down to the line. I set it with the iron and glue baste it in place. From there, I hand stitch the seams closed. The back looks great and I'm pleased with this method. The original instructions had you SID the backing closed, but this only works when joining two blocks. When you add the next row, you don't have the seam allowances to work with, so SID was not an option. I hope this makes sense. I can post a picture tutorial if you would like since I'm joining blocks tonight.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by sniktasemaj View Post
    Please post the pictorial tutorial. It would be great if you could share this technique.
    She already posted it on page 2 of the thread.

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