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Thread: Quilting a King-sized top

  1. #26
    Junior Member willowwind's Avatar
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    I've done it, both piecing & quilting. I used the gym floor of a local school where my DH works to lay it out.. Maybe you could ask a local school, church or someplace with a large enough floor space to borrow a floor for an hour or so. As far as quilting, I begin in the middle, rolling up the quilt to fit under the machine, I didn't use a long arm, and quilted it in sections, pulling the quilt toward me as it goes through the machine. It takes planning but its do-able. Good luck.
    Cathy S/Willowwind
    Cathy S/Willowwind

  2. #27
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    I have longarmed for 10 years now and was interested in this discussion. Recently, I sat at a hq sweet sixteen sit down at a LQS and had so much fun "sitting" and pushing the fabric around, but I thought oh, dear, pushing a king. As a challenge, I would still like to try, but I do think it would be very hard on the shoulders. My hats off to the gals that can wrestle it. I shorted my batting on a huge quilt of mine the other day, after 10 years of this, lol. Thank heavens for zippered leaders. I removed it to zig zag on the batting needed. I was stressing and sweating. My husband held the rolled up side as maneuvered the end with the batting to get it done. Wow was it heavy with a flannel back.

    Long story short. I think renting time is a great option. It is so much $ and time invested in my hobby business. Being the DIYer I am, I do love it, but..... Even if it seems like a lot of money to rent, it is still worth, and so much less investment and $ in your own. and, even if it seems about the same amount of $ as paying someone quilt it, you get the satisfaction of having done it yourself.

    Pay to rent time to do a small quilt, that can have some warbles and mistakes. If it is a busy quilt, you won't notice. Like paying for entertainment. You will be surprised how quickly you get comfortable. And the owner will be there to help you. I always encourage customers and anyone to give it a try, and they nod and don't go for it. It is intimidating at first, but so much easier than you think! I think people say it is a steep learning curve cuz it is so different it is scary, but practice a at the rental place on a couple of baby quilts, it will be worth it.

    I have offered so many friends to come over for free to try, so they can do their own. 0 takers to date, lol.



    That big rack sure is great for kings, but boy did I love that cute HQ sweet sixteen.
    Last edited by kerriy; 04-21-2012 at 05:08 AM.

  3. #28
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    I am working on one 120" x 100". It is such that I can make it in two pieces then sew the two together. I have most of the first one done. I just quit the quilting on block (2") away and will only have to quilt that area after the quilt is put together. I am waiting until I finish the quilting on the main quilt and put it together before attaching the 4" border. I can then quilt it all together. By the time I finish I hope someone will come along to help me post pictures.

  4. #29
    Senior Member redbugsullivan's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=DawnFurlong;5157229]I recently finished quilting my king size quilt on my dsm (and a vintage machine at that - a Singer 15-91). And I was worried about the same things you are worried about.
    I puddle my quilt when I FMQ.

    I am attaching a picture of my quilt while I was working on it, as well as the end result (almost end result - I still need to do the binding). I also added a picture of my favorite sewing machine - the one I used to FMQ on this top.

    I am inspired! I have the same machine and a bedspread sized queen quilt to do. But, what is puddling?
    Annette

    There is no fireside like your own fireside.

  5. #30
    Senior Member newbiequilter's Avatar
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    I can't comment on doing the actual quilting however as to the sandwiching....see if your LQS will let you come in and put a couple tables together (or three) to lay out your project and baste in whatever fashion suits you. If not LQS, how about a church or some meeting room that has banquet tables. Never hurts to ask....

  6. #31
    Senior Member GramMER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Writergrrl View Post
    I'm worried about quilting it. ...how in the world am I going to man-handle a king-sized quilt in my machine?
    Now would be the time to watch a tutorial on *lap quilting.* When I first learned to quilt in a community class, I was taught the lap quilting method. I made my first two huge quilts in less than 6 weeks that way. I carried each section with me everywhere I went--doctors' offices, school meetings, social gatherings, etc. It was a wonderful conversation starter too, because everyone gathered around to watch. You really ought to consider this method if your space is limited and if you do not have a long-arm quilter.
    GramMER to eighteen, plus two great-granddaughters and four adopted greats soon we hope!

  7. #32
    Senior Member GramMER's Avatar
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    My message is probably somewhere in outer space, but I did reply in detail.

    To shorten and simplify, I say watch a video or read a book about lap quilting. I made my first two quilts that way and they were huge. It is a practical and logical way for those with limited spake or time.
    GramMER to eighteen, plus two great-granddaughters and four adopted greats soon we hope!

  8. #33
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    Hey there: just Quilt as you go; one row at a time or one section at a time;; like doing small baby quilts; then just attach each one into rows. Sure--You Can Do It.......Its yours so it would not hurt to try and see how great it will be when you are finished and you will supprise yourself.......All things are possible. You won't know till you try. Let us know how it comes out. Leave a little extra on the square so the attaching will be easy.

  9. #34
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    I have found that people really "ooh" and "ahh" over anything hand quilted. Why don't you give that a try. It won't be done as fast, but it will be absolutely beautiful.

  10. #35
    Super Member BeckySt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I think I would consider cutting the batt in half. Quilt one half of the king size quilt, fold back the top and back and use batting tape or zig zag to re- attach the second half of the batt back and smooth the top and back out and quilt the other half. If you've done twin size before, this will be like doing 2 twin size?
    I know an awesome quilter who did it this way and hers were always amazing, now she has a long arm.

  11. #36
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
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    I have done a queen-sized quilt on my 1923 Singer 66. Yes, the quilt was big and bulky, but it was doable. Look at your quilt as if divided into quarters, work on one quarter at a time, beginning in the center. Make sure you have plenty of table space to hold the bulk of the quilt. I even put a small table (wood tv tray) to my left to hold some of the bulk while I work.

    To do the pin basting, I moved some things to create enough floor space to lay it out. If you don't have enough floor space, how about wall space? I've seen youtube videos about spray basting on a wall, and it looks like it would work nicely. Spray basting has the added benefit of not having to remove pins or basting stitches as you work. I personally have not tried wall basting though.
    jlm5419-an Okie back in Oklahoma!
    http://according-to-ginger.blogspot.com/

  12. #37
    Senior Member Delilah's Avatar
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    I cover my king bed with a big flannel sheet and spray baste. The flannel sheet holds the project in place and protects from over spray. Trick to spray basting is to start lightly and increase according to need. Some projects take to the spray better than others. Doing it on the bed saves the knees and back and spray basting a king quilt can be done in less than an hour.

    I also routinely quilt large quilts on my 9" Janome, but have done them on smaller machines. All but one of my 151 quilts have been done by me on the domestics. It takes practice and patience. Just finished one 108x108, another 96x104, and one 108x120. Some are done straight line diagonal, some SID, echo and shadow quilting, and most have at least some FMQ.

    I started out with small quilts and slowly got the confidence to do larger ones so don't get discouraged. Like I said, it takes practice and patience. My first attempt at FMQ is embarrassing and I wish that quilt was not being used by a grand niece!!

    Name:  #149 Generals Wives copy.jpg
Views: 174
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    This is the 108x108 and it has several different quilting designs and techniques.
    OCD in the OC

  13. #38
    Super Member audsgirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewgray View Post
    Would you share the link again. I did a search, but couldn't find it. Thanks.
    Here's the link again. It is on the Modern Quilt Guild site, but it is by Elizabeth Hartman of Oh, Fransson.

    http://themodernquiltguild.com/2012/...quilt/Fransson.

  14. #39
    Super Member dilyn's Avatar
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    I have done 2 king sized quilts on my domestic machine. They are a challenge to do but deninately 'doable'. I signed up for a Craftsy online quilting course and have been following her suggestions for sandwiching the quilt on a standard cutting table. You use large clips to fasten down first your backing, then batting and the the top. Once that area is pinned in place you remove the clips and move the quilt refastening as you go. PM me if you want more info on the class!

  15. #40
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    I have done one on my DSM.If after you have put and pinned the layers together-you can divide it into fourths and quilt each quarter at a time.Sort of like cutting a sandwich into 4 pieces.I just start towards the middle of the whole intersection and work my way outwards.Hope this is as clear as mud to you!
    Quote Originally Posted by Writergrrl View Post
    I've got all the fabric ready to go for the quilt top for my bed, and now I've got cold feet. Can I really do a king-sized top? I'm not worried about the piecing. I can piece until the cows come home. I'm worried about quilting it. I don't have enough floor space to lay it out with batting and backing. And even if I did, how in the world am I going to man-handle a king-sized quilt in my machine? I have a 9" throat, and I've successfully done two twin-sized quilts which weren't too bad. The local longarm quilters are a little out of my budget. Has anyone quilted a king top? If so, do you have any tips about basting and/or quilting?
    The man who speaks the truth is always at ease

  16. #41
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    can you quilt it in thirds??? Or maybe leave off the borders until the main part is quilted, I have done that it works okay you just have to leave room with the backing and the batting to add the borders. When you add the borders you sew thru all layers so that part is quilted.

  17. #42
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    Wow! These are some great suggestions!!! I'm floored by the number of quilters here who have done kings (and Cal Kings!) on your DSMs. Very, very inspiring. I'm feeling more confident. I love the idea of laying it out in a school gym or church dining hall. I also think I'll put an extra table behind my sewing table so that the quilt doesn't drag. I'm a little timid about quilting in sections, but the idea of cutting the batting in half and re-attaching it with a zigzag stitch as I quilt through the sections seems very doable.
    Jenny in DC

  18. #43
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    That's beautiful Delilah! It is possible!

  19. #44
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    How about getting quotes from LAQ to do just the basting. I haven`t done this yet but this is an option I`m going to try. Alex Anderson mentioned this at her seminar in Puyallup. She was charged $25 by her LAQ to just do the basting.
    Mountain Woman

  20. #45
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
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    I use 505 basting spray (the only type I will use, doesn't gum up the needle, etc.). Also have you checked out any of the blogs or info from Leah Day? She does all of her fmq on a domestic machine, she has a lot of great free info, here is a link to her home page:
    http://www.daystyledesigns.com/
    Regards,
    Kif
    PS: She has several blog posts where she discusses why she doesn't have a long arm, and doesn't want one...
    http://www.daystyledesigns.com/faq.htm#why
    Last edited by kiffie2413; 04-21-2012 at 09:09 PM.
    Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest~Mark Twain

  21. #46
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    Glad to hear that these stories are giving you courage. I did a king sized quilt on my home sewing machine. I wanted a challenge.

    I did pin baste the quilt and just took my time starting from the center out. I free motioned the quilt. The center is the hardest to maneuver but I think the trick is to keep the weight of the quilt off the area that you are working on. And than that, it is just persistence. (But isn't that the key to all quilting....even piecing. )

    Anyway, one reason I did a king sized quilt was to say that I machine quilted a king size quilt.

    Good luck!

  22. #47
    Junior Member brendaln's Avatar
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    Thank you pocoellie- I too have a King size one ready to quilt and was worried about how to do it. I'm in the process of moving but as soon as I get my room set up I'm going to try this. Thank you again.

  23. #48
    Super Member kiffie2413's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 21quilter View Post
    Glad to hear that these stories are giving you courage. I did a king sized quilt on my home sewing machine. I wanted a challenge.

    I did pin baste the quilt and just took my time starting from the center out. I free motioned the quilt. The center is the hardest to maneuver but I think the trick is to keep the weight of the quilt off the area that you are working on. And than that, it is just persistence. (But isn't that the key to all quilting....even piecing. )

    Anyway, one reason I did a king sized quilt was to say that I machine quilted a king size quilt.

    Good luck!
    .. I think it also helps to hear others have done it, and seeing the pics of all the great quilts (king size especially, in this case) that have been done on a dsm is an added bonus!!
    Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest~Mark Twain

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