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Thread: Quilting on top of appliqued pieces in a quilt

  1. #1
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Hello,
    I've been learning a lot from everyone on the message board & recent topics. Thanks! I was hoping that one of you might be able to give me some advice when quilting on top of appliqued pieces. I haven't done a lot of applique (until now) & found that when I tried machine quilting on top of the appliqued pieces of a baby quilt, my sewing machine would skip stitches occasionally. I tried different needles with some success (not as many skipped stitches) and adjusted tension but still get those skipped stitches occasionally. Tried slowing down, tried speeding up...etc. My machine didn't skip stitches on the regular parts of the quilt that were not appliqued. I used a lightweight fusable web for the appliqued pieces. I would appreciate any helpful hints as I have 2 more patterns for quilts that I would like to make which have a lot of applique. Thanks!

  2. #2
    SandraJennings's Avatar
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    Well first, let me say hello! Nice to have you on here.
    Now ....I usually hand quilt but I have understood that it is in the tension when we have problems with skipping. I have used fusibles on my quilts before and found that no matter what there is a little bit of the fusi stuff that can interfere with the needles. I eased up on my tension, and kept a handiwipe close to wipe the needle every once in awhile to remove the gummy's . I know we have plenty of gals here who can help you. They may have better idea's.

  3. #3

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    Why do you quilt over the applique? Just a thought. If it's a must, Then going by what I've learned it is the needle. You need a needle made for thicker fabric, as with applique you are going over several thickness's. When I'm sewing several thickness's I use a machine needle made for denim. (jeans). I've made several rag jean quilts and I've not missed a stitch by using these needles.

  4. #4
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Thank You! The handy wipes sound like a good idea. I originally wasn't going to quilt on the fused applique parts but I wasn't very happy with the way they looked after quilting all around them. The larger appliqued pieces (about 4" x 6")got a little wrinkly or wavy looking. I liked the effect of the quilting on them but was troubled with the skipped stitches. I will add to my notes your clever trick about using handy wipes. Thanks!

    Pam

  5. #5
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Hi Rebecca,
    I did try a denim needle. Actually I tried several different needles. I tried a 90/14 Microtex sharp needle, Jeans/ Denim 100/16, quilting needle 90/14 & had the best luck with the 80/12. I'm thinking that maybe the needle was not as big of an issue as the sticky fusible web that the needles were sewing through. I will be trying the handy wipe idea & see if that helps. Not sure when I'll be starting my other 2 appliqued quilt projects as I'd like to finish up about 3 other quilts in the works. I should have asked my question before I struggled all the way through the quilt & I may have saved myself some grief!

  6. #6
    ccbear66's Avatar
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    Welcome. Sorry that I can't help you with your problem. I send my quilts out to be quilted. Please don't forget to post pics when you get your quilts done. We all love the see the talent of others.

  7. #7
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Thanks for the welcome! I will take a picture of this quilt soon. What are the rules for posting a photo of a quilt that I made when I used a pattern designed by someone else? The quilt pattern was from a calander (given as a gift) which had a different quilt (with pattern included) for each month of the year. Do we just have to give credit to the designer or what? Do you know?

    Thanks!
    Pam

  8. #8
    Super Member zyxquilts's Avatar
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    Welcome Pam!
    It's always a good idea to give credit for our patterns, etc. There isn't a rule here about it that I know of, but it's always nice to have at least a note under the pic who's pattern you used & maybe the name of the calendar where you got the pattern. Whatever info you have for it.


    ...as I'd like to finish up about 3 other quilts in the works...
    We do have a rule of sorts about using the "f" word tho'...you'll need to watch that! LOL :lol:

  9. #9
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Thank You for the welcome! I'll gather all the info & post it with the photo. I am not guilty of using the "f" word too much (you know...the finish business) :lol: .

  10. #10
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Hi Pam, & welcome to the Board. Quilting on applique can add some really nice details to the front while creating very interesting quilting on the back of your quilt. It is also a good way to hide puckering or minor mistakes. All of that being said, may I ask what kind of fusible you are using that is still so sticky when you get to the quilting? If it were me, I wouldn't continue to use anything that is going to gum up my needle. You will end up spending way more time than you should cleaning the needle & hoping you aren't developing birds nests on the back (if some of the sticky stuff happens to catch a thread at the backing). I don't use much fusible, so I will not recommend a brand or type, but I'm sure many here can offer their experiences as a good reference to you.
    I know my comments are not very helpful now that you are already to the quilting stage, but there will be other quilts in your future to consider. For me, the quilting is the most fun stage of the process; the part that can really bring the quilt to life. It should, at the very least, be just as much fun as the piecing, and not be something you dread because there is so much extra work involved. Besides, machine quilters are supposed to minimize their starts & stops to reduce the risk of things like jagged looking lines and curves. So, you certainly do not want your needle gumming up at the wrong spot causing you to have to rip out an entire line of quilting. Not Fun!!

    Sorry I got long winded. I wish you all the best of luck with this and all future quilts, & by all means, please post a picture when it is "completed". :D

  11. #11
    lin
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    Hi Pam

    I don't know what you used but I've used some brands that were stickier than others. I've had good luck with Heat-n-Bond LITE (NOT the regular...that's a nightmare! LOL) and I use a top-stitch needle when working on bonded applique. I love the top-stitch needle (standard point 18/110) for this and for working on heavier fabrics such as flannel.
    I've never noticed my needle gumming up when I use the LITE and I go a little slower in these sections and haven't had much trouble with skipped stitches or tension issuses. Good luck! :)

    Not long ago, I accidentally used my regular Heat-n-Bond on a baby quilt, and wound up having to do the applique quilting by hand...using a larger, stronger needle and a big stitch. It was just awful!! I'll never make that mistake again. :oops:

  12. #12
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Hi Carla & thanks for the welcome. I certainly like the idea of the needle not getting sticky to begin with. Maybe someone out there with experience in quilting on machine applique can suggest a different type of fusable web. I purchased the fusable web off a bolt & will have to go take a look to see which brand it is. I am all for easy quilting with no hitches in my stitches :lol:

    Pam

  13. #13

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    I'm a little late with this, but you may be using the wrong type of applique film. Some are made for sewing over, and some aren't. Personally, I like the Steam-a-Seam brand. I have never quilted over appliques, but have done the buttonhole stitch around them after I have put them on with Steam-a-Seam and have never had a problem with skipped stitches or with gummy needles. Just carefully follow the directions and I don't think you will have anymore problems. Good luck!!

  14. #14
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Never too late for good advice. I didn't use Steam-a-Seam brand but I will certainly try that on the next applique quilt I do. I have a couple of applique quilts in mind but they are still out a little ways on my to do list. Thanks for the advice!! Good advice is always very much appreciated!

    Pam

  15. #15
    Suz
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    My thoughts!!! How many layers of fabric are we talking about? Did you fuse the first layer and than add more layers? This would mean lots of fusible.

    I hand applique and when there are multiple layers, I keep cutting away from the back side and just leave the seam allowance. Sometimes I cut as many as four times depending on the size of the pieces being appliqued.

    You could do a similar thing by planning and cutting away extra fusible and leave just the "rim" to fuse. Another idea would be to use lots of spray starch on the pieces to be fused and forget the fusible.

    Suzanne

  16. #16
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Hi Suz,

    I only quilted through one layer of fusible. I originally hadn't planned to quilt them but didn't like the way they looked with out the quilting. I like both your ideas. I will jot those ideas down in my "helpful hints" notebook. thanks!

    Pam

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