Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Recommended Sewing Machine? >

Recommended Sewing Machine?

Recommended Sewing Machine?

Old 09-24-2022, 05:30 PM
  #11  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: northern minnesota
Posts: 1,819
Default

I have a basic Bernina (215) which isn't made anymore. The most Basic Bernina now is the 325. This machine weights about 17 pounds which is not too bad. It does have some nice features like needle up or down, 9 needle positions, some memory and basic stitches. I think it would be a good basic first machine with enough features to start your sewing and quilting journey and then if you decide you really want to quilt and stitch up a storm, this size machine would be great for using as traveling machine for going to workshops. Some of the bigger fancier ones are really heavy and just to hard to carry around. Another thing to consider is deal support in your area. If you can, I would get a brand that really does have a dealer and tech support in your area as they will know about your machine and also will hopefully offer a variety of class. Most dealerships have new owner class.
sewingpup is offline  
Old 09-24-2022, 06:04 PM
  #12  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Chula Vista CA
Posts: 7,243
Default

I learned to sew on my mother's Singer 15-91. It is set in a cabinet with a knee control option, which I love. She gave it to me before she passed away. It is 73 years old and sews like it is new. I have the Janome MC 6600P that is set into a table designed for the machine. My point is, I love having my machines set into a cabinet/table. For me it's just more comfortable from an ergonomic stand point. I also have a Singer Featherweight, which is my travel machine. It sews like my 15-91. Hope you have a sewing machine dealer close to your home so you can test drive a variety of machines. You don't want to get a really cheap machine - it will be difficult to operate and discourage you from learning more.
Also, if you go through a dealer sometimes they will help you up grade within a year if you save the box. My Janome dealer would give me a full value trade-in if I kept the box, and my Viking/Husqvarna dealer gave me a full year (and I bought the floor model).
quiltingcandy is offline  
Old 09-25-2022, 04:36 AM
  #13  
Super Member
 
ptquilts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Vermont
Posts: 6,818
Default

I agree with Foggy, ask around. There are a lot of people with a machine tucked away that they don't use. Even put a request on your local FB page?
I've made hundreds of quilts, and all on secondhand machines.
ptquilts is offline  
Old 09-25-2022, 04:39 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
cindi's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Central Ohio
Posts: 970
Default

I just bought a machine recently and here’s my suggestion. Do your homework. Write down everything your current machine has that you like. Write down the throat space of your current machine. Now, write down everything you wish your current machine doesn’t have that you wish it did. Want more throat space? Note that. Want auto up/down? Note that. Etc., etc. Now, look for machines that have exactly what you want. Pick three or four and make a spreadsheet of those machines, their price, and check off everything that you want. Most machines have one thing but not the other.

Then go to your nearest shops and test drive them. Take fabric to test, including cottons, batiks and any of your favorite types of fabrics, along with different threads. How do your stitches look on each? Do you have to adjust tension for every fabric or does it smoothly change from one fabric to the next? Piece your fabric and check the 1/4” measurement on the machine. Is it a true 1/4” or will you always have to adjust your machine to piece? Try out their decorative stitches. Are they easy to program? Do you have to change feet too often for the stitches? Is it easy to thread, wind bobbins and load bobbins? Are applique stitches good? Or does tension constantly have to be adjusted for that? What is the shop like? Are they helpful? Did they sit with you and explain the machine (and don’t let them just demo it. YOU sit down and and do it as they explain!). Do they know the machine like the back of their hand? (I went to one shop and they had to pull out the manual to show the machine. I knew more about the machine from studying the online info than they did! I knew that machine was out!). Are the buttons convenient to touch? Do you have to go to too many screens to access most used stitches? Do they have beginner classes on the machine?

Yes, it may have taken me a little longer to write it all down, but I was confident in what I wanted and knew what to "test drive". I was able to get a better price on the machine that had everything I wanted just by doing my homework. Telling them you’re looking at several machines from several places just may get you a better price!

Last edited by cindi; 09-25-2022 at 04:57 AM.
cindi is offline  
Old 09-25-2022, 07:05 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 624
Default

Originally Posted by ptquilts View Post
I agree with Foggy, ask around. There are a lot of people with a machine tucked away that they don't use. Even put a request on your local FB page?
I've made hundreds of quilts, and all on secondhand machines.
Another vote for asking around to see if someone will lend/give you their machine. It is hard to know what features will be important to you until you spend some time actually sewing.

And if you get frustrated with your borrowed/gifted machine, remind yourself that that is the point. You are conducting an experiment to see what features will be useful to you. Write down what frustrates you and come back to this forum. We can probably help you through your issue or at least recommend a machine that you might eventually buy that will resolve the issue.
SuzSLO is online now  
Old 09-26-2022, 07:53 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 638
Default

Originally Posted by SuzSLO View Post
Another vote for asking around to see if someone will lend/give you their machine. It is hard to know what features will be important to you until you spend some time actually sewing.

And if you get frustrated with your borrowed/gifted machine, remind yourself that that is the point. You are conducting an experiment to see what features will be useful to you. Write down what frustrates you and come back to this forum. We can probably help you through your issue or at least recommend a machine that you might eventually buy that will resolve the issue.
Totally agree. Sewing machines are something that many people own and never use. A second hand machine would be an excellent and cheaper option for beginning this hobby. You can always upgrade when you know which features, you want.
my-ty is offline  
Old 09-26-2022, 12:11 PM
  #17  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
Posts: 7,960
Default

I like to use the Brother machines. You can pay as much or as little as you want and get a decent machine. Mine have lasted a long time and have helped me make many quilts. Goodluck in your search!
cathyvv is offline  
Old 09-27-2022, 10:50 AM
  #18  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 177
Default

Yes, my next purchase will be a mechanical machine. My favorite Bernina's computer's disk failed and there are no replacements for it. That means you have to buy a new sewing machine.
pennyhal2 is offline  
Old 10-03-2022, 05:24 PM
  #19  
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2022
Posts: 2
Default

Iíve always had great luck with the Brother brand of machines. My mom swears by Singer and Janome, but those can get expensive. Iím about to purchase a new machine myself. I was looking at this machine. Now I realize, some people have a very strong hatred for, but it was the last place I saw the machine I wanted for a good price and I could find the link quickly.
MalcolmM is offline  
Old 10-03-2022, 08:27 PM
  #20  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 177
Default

My favorite machine was the Bernina 1090...unfortunately, the computer board died and you can't get a replacement for it. I ended up buying a used one on Ebay that worked out fine...for now. So, I would second the advice to get a mechanical machine. They work forever. I travel with my travel mechanical machine. My favorite functions are "needle up, needle down," thread cutter, light bulb, and a handy reverse button. Ask to sew on the machine at the store to experience how comfortable you are with it and if the functions you'd like are easy to use. Have them demo how to thread it and the bobbin then see if you can do it by yourself. Threading can sometimes be tricky. Take your time and if you want to check out a machine more than once, don't be shy about going back to the store and test drive a machine more than once.
pennyhal2 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter