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Thread: Selling at Christmas Bazaar

  1. #26
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    I think the idea of having business cards available is a very good idea - especially with your booth location written in on it! - You might even have a tied down pen or pencil by the cards so people can write down what the item is that caught their attention.

    I hate carrying a bunch of stuff around - and have trouble remembering where I saw a particular item - especially at a large show.

    Maybe you could also advertise at your booth - "pay now, pick up when you leave" for items.

    Advertise if you are willing to ship items later or have people come to your home to shop later.

    I would be willing to buy the pattern for some items, even though I'm not willing to buy the item itself.

    Examples: casserole totes, mug rugs, potato bags.

    I also think it's hard to sell crafted items to other crafters.
    Last edited by bearisgray; 11-16-2011 at 05:56 AM.

  2. #27
    Senior Member CarrieC's Avatar
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    I agree with Dublb - as a seller I'd take lots of smaller things and one each of my larger things. I'd make sure I had a ton of business cards etc. I also had a sign up sheet for emails. I'd send out a mass email the following day (or sometime that week) detailing all that I had to sell and prices. It worked okay - I wouldn't be able to support myself or my addictions (FABRIC and YARN) but it helped! let me put it to you this way - I didn't feel I wasted my time.

    Good luck!

    Quote Originally Posted by dublb View Post
    When I go to craft shows I usually buy the small things. I only buy something bigger after leaving & checking my budget. I then try to contact the seller later. My advice is to take a-lot of small items & be sure to take some form of a business card. Good luck!
    Carrie, Queen of the Seam Rippers!

  3. #28
    Super Member ontheriver's Avatar
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    I participated in a show last month and found table runners and potholders to sell well. I even sold a couple of lap quilts. My mom makes raggedy ann dolls, I had her make some using more modern fabrics and colors for the clothes. She made approx. 25 of them and she sold out. Did not sell any pocket tissue holders or totebags.
    Jeanann

    Theres nothing wrong with me a little chocolate won't fix.

  4. #29
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    My DDIL and I went to several a couple weeks ago around our area. The first one we went to was very nice and had a wide variety of items and prices. But people weren't buying ANYTHING. We were scoping out to see what sells and what doesn't sell (for our future tries at craft shows). As far as we could see NOTHING was selling. One booth had shopping bags for $8 that had a piece of fabric sewed over the store logos to hide them. The other craft shows were in churches and very poorly organized and poorly displayed. Lots of junky jewelry. I have decided to focus on what I love, making quilts for charity and forget about trying to make any money off my projects.

  5. #30
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    I'm reading your replys with interest as my sister has started to participate in craft shows. She's done about 6 so far this year with mixed response. I don't believe she would rate any of them a great success. She said the lower priced items were best and people mostly just looked. Her best sellers were the small snap purses - made with a metal measuring tape for the closure - and the mugs with the organizer cover ( Simplicity pattern). FYI - we are in Kansas.

  6. #31
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    The card purses are 3-5"....not hard to make....I added a thin piece of fuseble to the inside so it would give it some stability....you can also make them larger for change purse...or make-up bag...so many choices.....Iam working on some more I will post later.......Trish

  7. #32
    Senior Member quiltingbee12's Avatar
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    Thank you all for your responses. I now have a much better idea of what to make, and have started making things I actually do have some items made - 6 potato bags, 3 lap quilts, 1 bed size, and some glasses cases. I didn't know about it in June and only found out a few weeks ago..

    Thanks again,
    Emily~

  8. #33
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    Baby bibs ..... in seasonal fabric, blue or pink fabric, whatever!! They ALWAYS sell!
    ~~ Pat

    Where am I? And what am I doing in this handbasket?

  9. #34
    Senior Member Cosy's Avatar
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    I have been making Miche bag shells for myself and family:1, could I sell these legally, and 2, WOULD they sell?
    Cosy
    A Thing of Beauty is a Joy Forever
    http://www.cosyquilt.com

  10. #35
    Super Member hperttula123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jillnjo View Post
    I know what the crayon rolls are! They are a peice of fabric that is long enough to sew slots for several crayons and then they roll up with the crayons in them and are tied with a ribbon. Super cute and very easy to make and kids love them and they are a great way to store crayons for trips. You can choose 2 matching fabrics, one for the outside and one for the inside using fun fabric that kids love.
    Here is one of the crayon rolls I made. They go together pretty quick too.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    enjoy your life...it's the only one you have!!!
    Heather

  11. #36
    Senior Member ywoodruff5's Avatar
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    Potato/corn/tortilla bags sell great - so do holiday pot holders. Good luck!

  12. #37
    Super Member Grandma58's Avatar
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    I hope you will pm me when you post. I like them and think they are worth making, yours are really sweet.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trish88 View Post
    The card purses are 3-5"....not hard to make....I added a thin piece of fuseble to the inside so it would give it some stability....you can also make them larger for change purse...or make-up bag...so many choices.....Iam working on some more I will post later.......Trish

  13. #38
    Super Member Grandma58's Avatar
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    cute I like them

    I have been making kindle covers, checkbook covers- which very few people use, photo album covers for small albums, cell phone cases, boarding pass holders - simplicity pattern. I also do baskets, whatever I get requests for or am in the mood for.

    Quote Originally Posted by hperttula123 View Post
    Here is one of the crayon rolls I made. They go together pretty quick too.
    Attached Images Attached Images


  14. #39
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    I make ornaments and they sell very well at our church fair. Three or four inch mini traditional quilt blocks in any colors, not necessarily red and green or holiday prints, can be made by making a quilt sandwich with a coordinating backing and thin batting. I layer Warm and White batting on the bottom, then the backing right side up and the block on top, wrong side up. (The block and backing are facing each other.) Sew all around, leaving a space for turning, and then turn right side out and edge stitch all around, catching in the unstitched turning place. Sometimes I've done paper pieced trees in 3 or 4 shades of green. They can be embellished and then finished as above. A hanging loop can be placed between the backing and the block before stitching, or it could be added afterwards. The items on your list sound perfect for a craft show. Have fun, and please let us know how it goes.
    Betsy in MA

  15. #40
    Senior Member vwquilting's Avatar
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    I would make soup bowl holders and sell them in 4's 19.95 a set.

    Bring a bowl and micro wave and heat some apple crisp, so they can smell it, give little pieces in a cup cake paper. This keeps their interest and gets others to come to your booth. Show them, how you can hold the hot bowl and sell them a set. Cost to make is about $1.10 each. Insul=bright and cotton at 10.95 a yard.

  16. #41
    Super Member dublb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vwquilting View Post
    I would make soup bowl holders and sell them in 4's 19.95 a set.

    Bring a bowl and micro wave and heat some apple crisp, so they can smell it, give little pieces in a cup cake paper. This keeps their interest and gets others to come to your booth. Show them, how you can hold the hot bowl and sell them a set. Cost to make is about $1.10 each. Insul=bright and cotton at 10.95 a yard.
    These would be great to sell! I love the idea about making the samples to draw the people in. I do have a question however. Would Insul-bright be good in the microwave? Would cotton be better? I don't know. I do love this idea!!
    Bev
    My initials are BB, so dublb is double B.

  17. #42
    Senior Member vwquilting's Avatar
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    They say not to put it in the microwave so use warm and natural instead 2 layers.

  18. #43
    Super Member Kellie G's Avatar
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    I was in a craft show 4 weeks ago and one 3 weeks ago....the one that I was in 4 weeks ago went very well, I sold lots of coasters and some table runners that matched, pocket tissue holders, and some childrens aprons....the one 3 weeks ago went nowhere, I only sold $3 worth of stuff over my table cost ($20). So I think it depends on where you are and your customers.....
    Kellie
    I won't know how much money I have for bills until I am done buying fabric.

  19. #44
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    What about eBook covers? I've made one for my KoboTouch and it's quite girly (:P) and I love it!
    I used to be "hot", now it's just "hot flashes!"

  20. #45
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Soap holders to hang on bathroom walls, toilet roll holders, peg bags, pretty sewing kits or needle holders, tape measure holders, casserole holders, scone holders, glasses cases, make-up bags, i-phone cases, covered coat hangers.(Maybe?)

  21. #46
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    The crayon rolls sound interesting . I don't remember seeing them at any craft show that I attended here in Fl. Do you make it for 72 colors and do you add the crayons too?

  22. #47
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    i've been in several craft shows. In my experiences it seems that things that are priced $20.00 and less seem to sell the best at Christmas shows. Now sure why but I think it's because people are buying more gifts at this time of year so they try to keep the price in line. Teachers gifts really sell well if they're something small and priced around $8.00. I make ornaments for that price and have a sign that says they'd make the perfect teacher gift. I usually sell out of those.

  23. #48
    Super Member jeaninmaine's Avatar
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    I went to a couple of church bazaars last weekend. There were a ton of table toppers and one lady had pincushions (the kind where you stuff a gathered circle of fabric then stick it into something like a cup or muffin tin) and stick a ten dollar price tag on it, I would like to have seen more unusual pincushions and ornaments for sale. Like the little owls and chickens I saw on here.
    Last edited by jeaninmaine; 11-17-2011 at 04:38 AM.

  24. #49
    Senior Member olebat's Avatar
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    Lots of great ideas here. One of the things which attracts me is the quality of the display, and the manner in which the items are tagged, the attitude of the vendor, and their appearance. Make the booth look festive, have cute signs telling what the item is, a price, and a sample of it in use. (Things like the use of sticky dots looks like a yard sale or flea market, not a bizarre.) Dress nicely, and avoid the bored look. Use pretty decorated baskets or boxes instead of plastic bins, a simple table cloth which does not distract from the items being offered, and avoid strong scents and perfumes. No music, but soft nature sounds are usually OK. Pay attention to your potential customers rather than having chats with your assistant or neighboring vendor. Borrow a little old crib to use to display baby items, or hang bibs from a high chair. Go vertical as much as you can so your items can be seen from a distance, and over the heads of people passing by or standing around. Old window shutters make great displays, and can be had for a song at places like Habitat for Humanity. Have an assortment of attractive bags for the items sold. White paper sandwich bags with a cute rubber stamp is far better than the crumpled plastic bag from the food store. Be festive and creative in the display, have an assortment of items, and a genuine pleasant attitude, a gift assortment, and pretty wrapping or bags in which to put the purchases. With proper preparation and confidence you should be fine. However, as many have said, these fairs have mood swings. Don't be despaired if you don't do well. Try again at a different location. By all means, (for any of you) post a photo of your booth, and share what seemed to go well, and what, if anything was a total flop.

  25. #50
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    emily, my experience has been this, whatever you make keep your products the same. i've seen tables with no more then 2 different products and more times then not they sold out. one woman made clown dolls, sold them for $30. must of had 25 of them and sold all but 1or 2 left but had some orders. another lady made reindeer candy canes and toy soldier ornaments, sold them for $1.50 -$2 each. inventory was about 75 each. sold out. there was also a lady that took scrap fabric fused too pieces together, cut out using cookie cutters as a pattern, put a matching string through them for $1 a pc. or 6 for $5 sold them all. (she had them displayed so they hung up) hope this helps.

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