Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 49 of 49

Thread: Serge before you bind?

  1. #26
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    long island ny
    Posts
    1,337
    Yup, I do it all the time. It just seems to make the ends neater and easier to work with.

  2. #27
    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,402
    Blog Entries
    2
    on the baby quilts and the doll quilts I check for square, trim if less than 1/8 of an inch (find the problem if more than that) quilt then check for square again, then serge with the blade disengaged, then bind.

    when binding as in piecing it is good to use a single,straight needle throat plate...the zig zag plate is just not able to produce a really nice straight stitch.....this is when my SINGER 301A really shines.

    do not my BERNINA hear me say this

  3. #28
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Winchester, Tn.
    Posts
    1,503
    I always serge the edges after the quilt is quilted. For me it is easier to get the binding on.

  4. #29
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    S. W. Indiana
    Posts
    7,481
    Quote Originally Posted by Monika View Post
    I am wondering if those of you that have sergers use them on your quilts before you sew the binding on. I saw someone on the web (I'm sorry I have since forgotten who) serge the edges to flatten and trim THEN sewed on the binding as usual. I am tempted to try this but I am a serger newbie and somewhat nervous. After all the work on a quilt, I don't want to mess anything up at the end of that sometimes long road.
    I sometimes do a very loose slip stitch all around a sandwich to keep the fabrics stable to do binding. A serger might serve the same purpose.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  5. #30
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    22,995
    Quote Originally Posted by jcrow View Post
    I always square up my quilt when I get it back from the quilter's and see that she's sewn a line about 1/16" all around the outside of the quilt and I usually have to cut a lot of it off to square it up. I don't sew it back down. I just bind it as usual. But I do sew my binding together so they don't drift apart when sewing. I learned that trick a few years ago and it's made a world of difference. Takes a little extra time, but it's so worth it. I sew 1/8" of the raw edge of the binding edges to each other before sewing them to the quilt.
    I also sew my binding edges together before sewing it to the quilt. It really does help to make it go on better. Especially with bias cut binding.

    I also DO NOT press the binding in half - because by the time the binding has made all it's turns -the half-way line is 'off' where the fold line actually is by the time the binding is ready for it's second stitching.

  6. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    179
    I do makes it easier to put the binding on an faster

  7. #32
    Senior Member MarthaT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Alabama
    Posts
    711
    Quote Originally Posted by Silver Needle View Post
    I never trim the batting or backing before applying the binding. The extra batting makes an even surface for the feed dogs and presser foot. Also I like to leave a little extra batting beyond the seam so as I turn the binding to the back side to hand finish I can be sure the binding is full of batting. It is my understanding this is one thing judges look for. That is my goal to enter a quilt in a show someday. I have also heard fuller binding lasts linger.
    I was wondering if anyone would mention this. Thanks! I hand baste around the edge as I hand quilt to hold the three layers together, but remove the basting after I machine stitch on the binding so the batting can fluff up and fill out the binding, making it nice and full and give a finish matching the thickness of the quilt.
    Thimble and Thread

  8. #33
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,383
    I just stitch around the perimeter of the quilt , just under 1/4 inch from the edge. My serger make too wide of a stitch just over 1/4 inch from edge( its an older machine), and most of my bindings are sewn on at 1/4 inch.

  9. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Harrisburg, OR
    Posts
    444
    I sew the binding on before trimming the batting and back. After the binding is on, I trim around it with pinking shears.

  10. #35
    Member ajpadilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Quito, Ecuador
    Posts
    72
    I just purchased a serger last week and the first thing I did was use it to cut and overcast the edge of my current wall hanging. It made it a breeze and kept all my layers in place for the binding. I think this is the way I will be working on all my quilt edges from now on! Good luck with your project.

  11. #36
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    7,174
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    I also DO NOT press the binding in half - because by the time the binding has made all it's turns -the half-way line is 'off' where the fold line actually is by the time the binding is ready for it's second stitching.
    ME TOO!!! It really makes a HUGE difference in how my bindings look. Even my husband can tell which of my bindings were pressed and which ones were not.

  12. #37
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Fayetteville, GA
    Posts
    2,881
    Blog Entries
    1
    I tried sergering the edges one time. I didn't like the feel after the binding was put on.

    I've heard about not pressing your binding in half bc after you sew then turn, the edge is not at the exact half way. I think I'll try not pressing. Wish this had been posted yesterday before I sewed the binding on.
    We would worry less about what others think of us if we realized how seldom they do.

  13. #38
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Texas
    Posts
    5
    I serge around each of my quilts so that the binding lays flat and all three layers are nicely pulled together. I went to a quild open house of various quilters and at the last home was asked if there was anything I saw missing in any of the quilting areas....my response was 'not a serger in the bunch'. Thought they were going to run me out of town on a rail!!! Was then told that 'a good quilter would never use a serger on her quilts'. Hummm, yesterday's Fons and Porter's show on PBS showed that THEY SERGE. As for me, I'm still serging the edge just before attaching the binding and it works wonderfully....

  14. #39
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,526
    I always serge mine--after quilting. It makes the edged so much easier to work with. Try it--you
    ll like it!

  15. #40
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Slidell, Louisiana
    Posts
    6,946
    Just extra work for nothing.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  16. #41
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    6,415
    I don't have a serger but I do stitch 1/8" around the edges to hold them together while I stitch on the binding.

  17. #42
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    74
    Yes, yes, yes!!!
    MLOQuilts

  18. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Merritt Island, FL
    Posts
    663
    Blog Entries
    16
    I guess that I am a rebel...I even pieced a quilt on a serger and boy did it ever go fast. I loved doing it and there were no hanging threads off the edge. Years ago, I made baby quilts for my granddaughters (now 25 and 26) and did the edges on the serger. Obviously, baby quilts get washed frequently and they held up great.

  19. #44
    Member vlrigdon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Florissant, MO
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Silver Needle View Post
    I never trim the batting or backing before applying the binding. The extra batting makes an even surface for the feed dogs and presser foot. Also I like to leave a little extra batting beyond the seam so as I turn the binding to the back side to hand finish I can be sure the binding is full of batting. It is my understanding this is one thing judges look for. That is my goal to enter a quilt in a show someday. I have also heard fuller binding lasts linger.
    This sounds like a good idea, I have so much trouble sewing the binding on with 1/4" seam, the quilt seems to go all over the place, so that some parts are 1/4", some are 3/8", sometimes I get 1/8"! But - at this point, are you confident that your quilt top is square? You can't square it up after the binding is on. I like this idea, but how do you handle squaring up the top? Thanks!
    "Sunshine on my shoulders makes me happy!"

  20. #45
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Round Rock,Texas
    Posts
    6,134
    I zig zag my quilts before binding, that way I can be certain that all the layers are together. I use a long,wide zig zag, about a 5mm length and width.
    Sharon W.

  21. #46
    Senior Member Chay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    405
    It sounds good in theory but by the time I'm at the binding stage I'm like a horse heading for the barn and would not want to do an extra step.

  22. #47
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,205
    I once surged around a big quilt and it worked like a charm. Then I did around a lap robe, and it didn't work at all. I scliced the surging off, and the quilt got a quarter inch smaller. Then the border was smaller than I had planned, and doesn't look as nice. I don't know what I did wrong that time. I've never done it again, and I won't.

  23. #48
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,205
    I once surged around a big quilt and it worked like a charm. Then I did around a lap robe, and it didn't work at all. I sliced the surging off, and the quilt got a quarter inch smaller. Then the border was smaller than I had planned, and doesn't look as nice. I don't know what I did wrong that time. I've never done it again, and I won't.

  24. #49
    Senior Member qwkslver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    584
    I do. It makes me feel like there is less chance of raveling. I serge everything I can.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.