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Thread: sewing batting scraps together

  1. #1
    Senior Member AlvaStitcher's Avatar
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    sewing batting scraps together

    I have several large-ish pieces of Warm & Natural cotton batting left from other quilts and need a batting for a small-ish baby quilt. LOL Is there a right or wrong way to zigzag the pieces together like there would be for fabric. There isn't a straight of grain to batting is there?

  2. #2
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    I use matching thread and a large zig zag to sew batting scraps together. I only use them in a quilt if the backing or front is fairly dark. I don't want someone to hold the quilt up to the light and see a seam line in the batt. That just my opinion on it.

  3. #3
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    There isn't a straight of grain in batting as far as I know (which might not be too far). I would try stretching a piece to see if it stretches one way more than the other. Maybe also try tearing a small piece in both directions and see if it tears more easily one way or the other. The stuff I use doesn't stretch in either dimension, and I just use it however I fit it together.

  4. #4
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    I have only done this with "quilt as you go" methods. I didn't have any trouble, and I didn't worry about grain. Just my opionion though
    Lisa

  5. #5
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I make a straight cut on the edge of each side of the pieces I want to sew together. Then i use the 3 stitch zig zag stitch. It stitches perfectly flat and avoids the 'ridge' that a regular zig zag and make. I piece batting together all the time. It is too expensive to waste.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cactus Stitchin's Avatar
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    I like the advise you have already received and will add that when I cut the straight edge I usually slightly overlap the two pieces then use a ruler to cut both pieces within the overlapped area. This way the two sides match perfectly even if my cut is not perfectly square.

  7. #7
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    I love the iron on tape for this. It's about an inch wide. As long as it's the same type batting, joining pieces is fine.

  8. #8
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    There's no grain with W&N, but there is an "up" side and a "down" side. Just match those when you sew the pieces together and you will be fine. I started out doing the recommended way - cutting a wavy line through both pieces and sewing together by hand - then used the tape for a while - but I've finally decided that zigzagging them together with the sewing machine is just as good, and much faster.

  9. #9
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    Three stitch zig zag is my method. Works for me.

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    Oh woe is me, I have to be the one to ask, what is three stitch zig zag?
    In my dream world, fabric is free and sewing makes you thin.

    Sharon

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    Quote Originally Posted by sprice View Post
    I love the iron on tape for this. It's about an inch wide. As long as it's the same type batting, joining pieces is fine.
    I buy thin fusible jersey for this (found in the interfacing section of JA's and such). I buy it by the yard , and cut into strips. Same as the iron on tape, but much, much cheaper and you can cut the width you need.

  12. #12
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    i have good success with an edge joining foot and a larger zig zag
    https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C....0.QvHy50aBS8w
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    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I just butt the pieces side by side & zigzag a wide stitch down the length. Works great, you can not tell the batting has been pieced once it’s quilted into the Quilt.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  14. #14
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grammasharon View Post
    Oh woe is me, I have to be the one to ask, what is three stitch zig zag?
    It is a specific stitch usually found on newer machines. It's just like a zigzag but, instead of taking 1 stitch to the right and 1 stitch to the left, it takes 3 stitches to the right and then 3 stitches to the left. The individual stitches are smaller, but the zigzag is still there. It's a way of avoiding "toe catchers" when you need a wide zigzag and makes the zigzag stronger.

  15. #15
    Super Member Doggramma's Avatar
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    I use a glue stick, and overlap the pieces just a tiny bit. You need to let it dry though before using the finished piece.
    Lori

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  16. #16
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I do it all the time. I sew a ladder stitch and noone knows it but me. I mostly use hi loft poly batting.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  17. #17
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    I use the wavy stitch. Almost all my batting is W&M so I do make sure the scrim sides are on the same side.

    Edited to add:
    I quilt on a long arm so mostly I just butt the two pieces up together and stitch out my panto. I like curvy, swirly pantos and most of my patterns, never go more than 1 to 2 inches without a seam running across it. Everything is stabilized very well. I can never tell where I joined the two pieces together even after many washes.
    Last edited by Barb in Louisiana; 03-19-2018 at 04:31 PM.
    Sew a Little, Love a Lot & Live like you were dying!

  18. #18
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    I love all the wonderful advice here. I am really learning a ton of good, very useful stuff. Up to now, I just stick the pieces together and "zig-zag" them together by hand ... real large stitches. Now, I think I'll try some ideas y'all have here. Thanks!

  19. #19
    Senior Member IceLeopard's Avatar
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    I just overlap them. Once it's quiltedvyou can't tell.
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  20. #20
    Super Member Teen's Avatar
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    I zig zag on my machine after butting the pieces together; thread color same as batting. easy peezy.
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  21. #21
    Super Member WMUTeach's Avatar
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    I do this frequently but I use the iron-on tape. I works so well and I have never had any problems with it. A small investment that always works is good for me. I always butt up straight edge to straight edge and iron carefully following the directions on the package. Easy, peasy and always successful.

  22. #22
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    I zig zag them together all the time. To get the edges the same I overlap them a bit and then cut through the overlap. Take away the thin strips on both pieces and your edges will match perfectly. I will often have more than one seam in the batting in some quilts. The small pieces of batting get used for pot holders and quilt as you go squares and even then I've had seams in them. I do make sure that it is the same kind of batting. I use mostly Warm and Natural but I do also have some Hobbs 80/20. I don't mix the two.

  23. #23
    Senior Member AlvaStitcher's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for you responses. I'll give it a go!

  24. #24
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WMUTeach View Post
    I do this frequently but I use the iron-on tape. I works so well and I have never had any problems with it. A small investment that always works is good for me. I always butt up straight edge to straight edge and iron carefully following the directions on the package. Easy, peasy and always successful.
    Me, too. Have had great results. I use W&N, almost always. If I thought I was making an heirloom or a work of art to be judged in a show, I might hesitate to piece batting by any method, but that's not me. One word of caution, though. I have seen several antique quilts where the batting was torn along the edge from people tugging and pulling the quilt up under their chins. If you have to piece batting, it would be best to place the joined area where it won't get that additional stress.
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  25. #25
    Super Member quilting cat's Avatar
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    My machine has a stitch that puts a straight stitch after each zig- or zag-. I like the added stability this gives to pieced batting. I have not had any problems piecing W&N scraps without considering which direction they may have originally laid.
    Retired math teacher --
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