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Thread: Sewing the edges of a quilt together before binding?

  1. #1
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    Sewing the edges of a quilt together before binding?

    Do you sew the edges of a quilt together after quilting, before binding? I usually do not, but I have had the back move a little occasionally. This quilt has thicker batting and I feel the need to align the edges before the binding goes on. Any way to get around one more step to finishing?

  2. #2
    Super Member SusieQOH's Avatar
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    I haven't but now that you bring it up it may be a good idea.

  3. #3
    Super Member Jeanne S's Avatar
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    Yes, I use long basting stitches on all 4 sides close to the edges as possible. Most if not all is then trimmed off after sewing the binding on.

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    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    I agree that is a good idea and I have had problems with the back as well... but I get lazy and hardly ever actually do it

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    Yes, I use a zig zag stitch with a very small width so it's almost straight. It locks down the edges of the quilt. The binding looked so much better on my last two quilts.

    Honestly, the extra step may have taken 10-15 minutes extra.

  6. #6
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    This is a baby quilt, so it won't take that long.

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    Super Member roguequilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irishrose2 View Post
    Do you sew the edges of a quilt together after quilting, before binding? I usually do not, but I have had the back move a little occasionally. This quilt has thicker batting and I feel the need to align the edges before the binding goes on. Any way to get around one more step to finishing?
    depends ..upon how soon i'll be able to get to the binding. if there's time i do it as soon as i finish the quilting
    the rogue quilter - in from wandering in the sun and snow with camera in hand.

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    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhonda K View Post
    Yes, I use a zig zag stitch with a very small width so it's almost straight. It locks down the edges of the quilt. The binding looked so much better on my last two quilts.

    Honestly, the extra step may have taken 10-15 minutes extra.
    Agree!
    I do the same, except just stick with a straight stitch.
    I've even stitched around again, after the binding is machine stitched in place,
    before I start the hand stitching of the binding.

    Either or both, help hold all the layers together and definitely give a nicer finished binding.

    As RhondaK said, it only takes a few minutes, and the results "pay" for the time!
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    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I avoid this problem by not trimming the quilt before adding binding. Instead of cutting, I mark the cutting line. (I use a regular Sharpie permanent pen because I want the marking highly visible but do not want any chance of it bleeding.) I align the raw edge of the binding with this line to sew it on. After the binding is sewn on one side, I trim the quilt sandwich to fit. (Be careful not to cut through the binding at the corners! That would create holes.)

    It sounds counter-intuitive, but I found that this approach eliminates the issue I used to have with having an occasional edge flip on me when sewing on the binding. Also, it lets me adjust the depth of the batting so it fills the binding the way I want it.

    If you prefer to baste the edges, I recommend doing this basting before trimming. Being able to pin to the right of the machine basting line helps keep everything even.

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    I have begun basting with a large stitch around the quilt edge before I start putting the binding on. It does keep the back in line, but occasionally I end up with a little pucker at the end of the binding process. (I bind by machine; can't hand sew anymore)
    I think the pucker is because the binding is still a little stretchy, but the basted edge of the quilt is not stretchy any more. I might need to apply a little more tension to the binding when sewing it on.

  11. #11
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garden Gnome View Post
    I have begun basting with a large stitch around the quilt edge before I start putting the binding on. It does keep the back in line, but occasionally I end up with a little pucker at the end of the binding process. (I bind by machine; can't hand sew anymore)
    I think the pucker is because the binding is still a little stretchy, but the basted edge of the quilt is not stretchy any more. I might need to apply a little more tension to the binding when sewing it on.
    If this happens most of the time when you're basting the entire quilt, try lessening the pressure on your presser foot/or lengthening your basting stitch.
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    i sew the layers together. i also baste the edges of my binding together.

    that way, i only have "two" layers to align while attaching the binding.

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    no - in fact I discovered I have more problems if the edge is basted than open. I trim my quilt right after it comes off the LA (because I use the LA table to do it). But I machine bind, so I'm sewing the binding to the back.

    I attribute a lot of my success to using a straight stitch machine with a narrow foot and narrow feed dogs. I had more problems when I used my swing needle machine before I bought the juki.
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  14. #14
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I always baste using a long stitch around the quilt. Then I trim off excess and sew binding to back, flip and sew to front.
    Another Phyllis
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    Sometimes I trim then bind, while other times, I follow the same procedure as Prism99 but in both instances I sew a straight line of stitching all the way around in a bright contrasting coloured thread (that way I can see it – eyes are not what they used to be).

    HettyB

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    When I make a quilt I make sure the outer borders are sewn on squarely whether they are mitered or not. After I layer my quilt and baste it (I like the Elmer's school glue method) I stitch around the outer edge with a long stitch. This keeps the layers from separating while I quilt it. Then, it holds the layers together when I trim it. I am careful to use a large square ruler when doing the corners to be sure they stay square. This works well for me. I generally sew the binding on the back by hand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    I always baste using a long stitch around the quilt. Then I trim off excess and sew binding to back, flip and sew to front.
    This is the way I do it also. Usually have no problems but sometimes there is a little pucker when finishing up sewing binding to quilt back.

  18. #18
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    Yes, doing that right now - I use a 3.5 or even 4.0 stitch length on my Pfaff domestic. That "one more step" is (to me) very important.
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    I typically don't bother but I've occasionally serged around my quilt edges before to make my binding easier.

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    I cut the batting off my quilts by finishing g the edges with a serger before I put 5he binding on, it gives me a smooth solid edge.

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    I always (now) stitch around. Reduces problems at binding time. If I am hand quilting, I often run out the last few inches of my short thread in the binding area. Then I trim, and add binding.

  22. #22
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    I always stitch around the edge of my quilt before I trim the batting and the backing and before I put on the binding. It makes it so I have one less thing to match up when putting on the binding. If I have a pieced border I always stitch around the outside edge before I sandwich the quilt as well to keep it square and keep seams from unsewing.

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    Senior Member janjanq's Avatar
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    I'm confused. How do you trim the edges after the binding is sewn on?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanne S View Post
    Yes, I use long basting stitches on all 4 sides close to the edges as possible. Most if not all is then trimmed off after sewing the binding on.

  24. #24
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    I didn't stitch around the edge on a recent baby quilt I finished and really regretted it. It was a pieced quilt and I wound up having to "unsew" part of the binding to go back and make sure the pieced sections didn't pull away from the binding. I did extend
    the batt into the binding because I like that look on a baby quilt,
    so that may have had something to do with it,because I usually don't have that problem on a pieced quilt. Next time I will sew around the perimeter first for sure!

  25. #25
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janjanq View Post
    I'm confused. How do you trim the edges after the binding is sewn on?
    Trimming takes place after the binding has been sewn to the first side, before the binding is turned around the edge and sewn to the other side.

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