Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 56

Thread: Sewing machine overload

  1. #26
    Super Member Glenda m's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,132
    Quote Originally Posted by kristakz View Post
    Other than the larger throat, quilting doesn't need fancy stitches. Straight stitch for piecing. Free motion capability (drop feed dogs) for quilting. You already know you want a few fancy stitches - that's still not a high end machine, and I don't think one is necessary. My old Kenmore, which I bought for about $300 does a blanket stitch.

    The throat size - after quilting for 7 years I would definitely pay for a decent throat. I have about 7-8" on my machine, and it is a pain in the neck to do anything much bigger than a baby quilt. I have done it however - all the way up to king size. If you can get a larger throat without breaking your budget, I say go for it. But don't let them push you into fancy embroidery stitches and what-not. And it's possible to do a lot with a smaller throat, with a little bit of creativity and perseverance, if you can't afford the big throat now. After 7 years, I'm splurging on a long-arm machine (which arrives tomorrow)
    I love your Avitar. Wonder why? LOL
    You can get older, but you never have to grow up! Tomorrow's just a future yesterday!-Greg Fergerson

  2. #27
    Super Member Amythyst02's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ.
    Posts
    1,355
    When I went shopping about this time last year, I went with my list in hand of things I HAD to have on my new machine. I went with the fabric I was working on at the time, so I could test drive it with my fabric, not theirs. The one thing I learned here from all these kind folks was we are all different in the things that are important to us, so chose what is right for you.

    I do not have a top of the line machine but I do have a very good one, for me. I found her sitting over on the shelf with the used/trade in machines. There she sat all by herself because she had been a store display machine. There is another name for them, but for the life of me I cannot think of it. She had all the things that came with her new, and even the large add on table. Does she do everything I wanted? Yes, but now I have thought of things I would have added to that list.

    I am one of those folks that truly love all those decorative stitches and I use them. So the more stitches the better. lol.

    But at the end of the day, no one can decide what is best for you, but you. Don't let the pushy sales folks steer you in the wrong direction. I was so lucky, the lady that helped me, was so nice, and continues to answer my questions, and help me even today. She let me try out every machine I was interested in. She told me the pros and cons, but never tried to convince me one was better than the other.

    Good luck in your search. Have fun, and hope you find that perfect machine !!
    Amythyst

  3. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    239
    Write down what you want in a machine such as wide throat space, blanket stitch, etc... I have to have the needle down option on my machine and I love the option that i have to make the stitches wider .... it is like everything else you have to do your research and if there is a quilt show near you ...go and try out the machines ... and sometimes at the shows they give Great discounts ...!!
    hugs
    quiltinmama

  4. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Posts
    83

    Cool What to buy, what to buy:

    Quote Originally Posted by Rose Marie View Post
    I started out with a cheap Brother machine. It is now my backup machine. One thing about Brother machines is they are good machines and reasonable.
    I now have a Viking Sapphire computer machine. I love it. It has a 10 in throat and that has become a must have.
    Love the needle down function and that is now a must have also. My quilting has improved so much by having a fancy machine.
    Do lots of research before investing in an expensive machine.
    Now Im wanting an embroidery machine, it never ends.
    I started out with a small Janome a long time ago - I still use it going to classes or special events - it is light weight and does a good job at sewing. I work part-time at a fabric shop that sells Babylock and Viking machines. After watching, listening and learning about our machines, I bought a Viking Sapphire 875 - I love mine too. I have now added a Viking Ruby embroidery machine.....I love it too. One good thing about Viking - the bobbins, feet and accessories are interchangeable on all Viking models. And, like Rose Marie says - the large throat is a blessing in handling large quilts. That was one of the main attractions of the Viking when I was looking for a machine. I have friends with Berninas - Try a lot of different machines - don't let them confuse you. Just try them - you'll know if you like the features and if it feels good to you when you sew - kinda like driving a new car. Make sure of warranties and if you need something replaced, repaired or just a good cleaning/tune-up - it is helpful to know a good reputable place to have it done. I am a believer in good machine maintenance and a trustworthy person that works on them. Good luck to you and let us know what you decide.....
    Too much to quilt, not near enough time....

  5. #30
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Horse Country, FL
    Posts
    7,255
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have a FW which is and looks used. Also have a lovely Pfaff. The FW is my machine of chnoice unless I need decorative stitching!! So do as others suggest and figure out what you really, really NEED and then go gor a good quality machine that does what you need.
    "A woman is like a tea bag-you can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water." Eleanor Roosevelt

  6. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    kannapolis, nc
    Posts
    391
    Check with local repair shops (some dealers also repair) ask what used machines they have. If you buy from a shop instead of an individual you will get a warranty. Decide how much you can comfortably afford and stick to it. I have 4 machines, two Pfaffs that I bought from a Bernina dealer for $200 and $400 and got a years warranty and a free service at the end of the year. I bought a Singer Featheweight 75 from HSN for $212 (coupon, sale and free shipping) for different stitches (making clothes) and just bought from HSN a Singer heavy weight for $349 with lots of extras. You will find that you may need or want more machines for different things. You will at least want a back up for when you main machine is in the shop. If you decide to take classes you will want a light weight machine for that. Machines are like fabric- addictive! You did the right thing to walk away and clear your head. I always want a new machine just like anything else there is always something bigger and badder than what I have.

  7. #32
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Slidell, Louisiana
    Posts
    6,946
    If I were going to buy a new machine, I'd go to a place where you can try them out. And I would try to just stick with what I needed, not a bunch of stuff I'd never use. I've been sewing on my old kenmore given to me from my mom, and I love it. All depends on what you want to be able to do with it.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  8. #33
    Senior Member lonestardreams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    409
    Just try the different machines that you are attracted to and make your decision on what works for you.

    I have a Brother Laura Ashley and LOVE it. I feel challenged by it to learn new skills and use the many stitches it offers. It's been great for me so far. I knew when I tried it at the shop that we were meant for each other. I know it's not everyone's machine though and love to see when someone feels about their machine the way I do about mine.

    Try them all, where ever you go. You will find your machine.

  9. #34
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,074
    I have a Janome 6500. I bought the floor model and it came with a full warranty. I would try getting a floor model or a machine that was a trade-in if you want a more expensive machine. Janome also has machines that are lower in price that don't have as many bells and whistles and they do a good job.

  10. #35
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    here is the deal...the more a machine has, the less you will use!

  11. #36
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Keller, TX
    Posts
    1,459
    I have two 6600...one for home one for cabin....It is known as the quilting machine from Janome.....the 7700 is the newest and greatest, but I would not trade up from my 6600. Make a list of the features you would like, larger throat plate, auto thread cutter....this feature is the number one thing on my list....a must have for piecing. I purchased a 3160 QC Janome for classes because it was light weight and had the auto thread cutter. Your needs are personal, so make that list and compare. I have purchased numerous machines from Brubakerssewing.com and love their service and honestly in dealing with customers. They are across the country from where I live, but would not purchase from one of my local dealers on a bet. Give them a call, tell them what features you would like on a good quilting machine, tell them your budget. They will honestly let you know the best machine for you. They also have slightly used machines at great prices too. (I have no connection with them...just a very satisfied customer) They have other lines besides Janomes.
    It is nerve racking going to dealers to look and try machines. The high end machines are so enticing...but, in most cases, not required to make beautiful quilts. Take a quilt sandwich to the store with you and try out several machines, check your features list and see what the best buy is. Remember, if you order online, whether Brubakers or not....there is no sales tax and usually no shipping. You can research features on machines online too. Just google the brand and model and you can see the list. Best of luck in your quest. D in TX

  12. #37
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Prescott Valley, AZ
    Posts
    1,330
    Happiness is having a good quality machine that does what you want and doesn't make you feel guilty about spending the money. In the 70s and 80s I went through several high priced machines that weren't worth the money I spent on them (top of the line Kenmore and Montgomery Ward). Then I found a true sewing machine shop where I bought a Pfaff. I fell in love with sewing again. I now own several machines just because I love them. I have both low cost machines and pricey machines. I have learned that my requirements are (1) heavy enough not to move around when I fmq; (2) holds tension without constant adjusting; (3) feeds the fabric straight; (4) decent space in the harp. Anything else is luxury.

    Test them all. Buy what feels right to you that is within your budget. There are both old and new machines that can do that.
    Shirley in Arizona

  13. #38
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,074
    I have a Janome 6500. I bought the floor model and it came with a full warranty. I would try getting a floor model or a machine that was a trade-in if you want a more expensive machine. Janome also has machines that are lower in price that don't have as many bells and whistles and they do a good job.

  14. #39
    Senior Member quiltmau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    New Milford, CT
    Posts
    507
    I bought a Baby Lock Symphony -it is way more machine than I need but I love it. I purchased this machine as my BFF has a Baby Lock and loved it as well.

    I started out on a Singer - my DGM's and it worked like a dream-I also have a Singer that I bought at Costco for $89 and it has a lot of bells and whistles.

    Look around and DON'T buy more machine than you can afford or will ever use. Spend it on fabric instead!!

  15. #40
    Member Eyelets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    48
    I wait for a good deal. It is worth it. Since I don't embroider and don't ever want to, I bought a Viking Platinum several years ago at the end of its model run, and I love it - that's for regular sewing. Then I fell in love with free motion quilting. I wanted a longer harp, and a knee lift. I don't need a lot of glitz, so I finally waited until I came across a very good deal on a Janome 6300. Wonderful machine, get's not much notice because of its glitzy sibling, the 6600, and even the 6500 has more stitches, etc. I bought the 6300 knowing it hasn't got mirroring or a stop/start button, but those I have on the Viking, plus all the stitches. The Janome 6300 is a terrific machine - easy to use and very strong. Sews at 1000 stitches per minute if you want to do that, and yet has the speed control setting as well, which I use because otherwise I *WILL* got too fast. Take a look at this machine _ bought mine online because dealers usually prefer to sell you more expensive machines, or they have basic machines, and not much in the middle. You needn't spend much to do quilting - a basic mechanical machine will do it as well as an expensive machine, but you do have to always work with tension and when you have the settings right - write it down! Include the thread type, the tension settings and foot pressure setting if you have that feature. Good luck.

  16. #41
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Northfield, MN
    Posts
    340
    I have used a Brother CS600i for several years. I am learning how to machine quilt on it, even though the throat is small. There is more than one way to skin a cat... Go with what you can afford. Don't be swayed by a machine that has dozens of bells and whistles. You might find that you don't use most of them.
    Anita in Northfield, MN

  17. #42
    Junior Member sweetlummi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    silsbee TX
    Posts
    149
    WOW . 30 you must have some great quilt there , I just started my husband found a machines at a yard sale for $20 and for just start it work good. Some day if I get good would love a nice one but for passing time this is good



    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    No, you do not NEED one of these!
    I, for example, have been quilting for 30 years, have taught, designed, published, done commissions, and owned a large quilt shop, yet have never owned such a high end machine. I quilt on an 18 year old mechanical Bernina 1031 and adore it. I also own two vintage Berninas, an 830 and an 807.

    "Wanting", now, that's a totally different story.....and completely depends on your ability to pay, your willingness to pay, your motivation for buying, and what you plan to do to make the purchase worthwhile in the future.....besides bragging rights, of course!

    Jan in VA

  18. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    776
    I have heard good things about the Janome 7700. I have a computerized Brother Cs6000I with 63 different stitches. Rarely use the fancy stitches, just buttonhole or zigzag, am not getting much from the 63 stitches. I want to buy the Janome 7700 this fall, so if you buy this machine, let me know how you like it. The one thing you do not have if you buy new off the internet is the warranty is not valid unless you buy through a dealer. The prices are better off internet than through a dealer. Good luck.

  19. #44
    Super Member k9dancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Mena, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,354
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by kristakz View Post
    Other than the larger throat, quilting doesn't need fancy stitches. Straight stitch for piecing. Free motion capability (drop feed dogs) for quilting. You already know you want a few fancy stitches - that's still not a high end machine, and I don't think one is necessary. My old Kenmore, which I bought for about $300 does a blanket stitch.

    The throat size - after quilting for 7 years I would definitely pay for a decent throat. I have about 7-8" on my machine, and it is a pain in the neck to do anything much bigger than a baby quilt. I have done it however - all the way up to king size. If you can get a larger throat without breaking your budget, I say go for it. But don't let them push you into fancy embroidery stitches and what-not. And it's possible to do a lot with a smaller throat, with a little bit of creativity and perseverance, if you can't afford the big throat now. After 7 years, I'm splurging on a long-arm machine (which arrives tomorrow)
    I like to do most of my work on a vintage Featherweight. I FMQ on it too, and even thought the harp is not huge, I have done king sized quilts on it. Most of my quilts are smaller than that, and a larger harp is the one thing I'd love to have on that machine.

    For appliques, I use an old Kenmore that has a blind hem stitch that I can adjust to make a blanket stitch.

    A couple of weeks ago I started (and had to finish) a quilt top on a more modern machine. I had it out to make a label for another quilt, and without thinking, started piecing on it. Never again. I had more problems with that than I ever have on my older machines. Vintage is the way to go IMHO.
    Stephanie in Mena

  20. #45
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Florida - formerly Montana
    Posts
    3,499
    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    Buy what you like and can afford and don't fret over wondering if you made the right purchase. There will always be newer machines. It usually takes three or four machine purchases over time before you find the one that is the one.
    Very good advice.
    Alma
    Nami to 6

  21. #46
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ashdown, AR
    Posts
    9,675
    Blog Entries
    1
    I just went to Walmart and bought a cheap Brother machine. It has all the features you need and is less than two hundred. In fact the one I got was 139.00. Has the drop down feed dogs and lots of stitches. Has a 25 year warantee.
    A finished quilt excites me!! Whether is it mine or yours!

  22. #47
    Super Member Central Ohio Quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    1,422
    I have been quilting for over 30 years, all on my 1969 Singer Stylist. A few years ago I got my mother's Singer 301. I love them both. And they are the only ones I have ever used. As others have said, don't feel the need to buy a grand machine when a plainer will do the job you need!

  23. #48
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    rural Maryland
    Posts
    1,566
    I always have to laugh when I see posts like yours. The modern day quilter seems to have totally abandoned the art of hand quilting. Even one of my guilds that is running a begginer workshop listed as the final step they would teach as preparing your quilt for the long armer. I am predominately a hand quilter but do make approxamately 20 simple Linus quilts a month. I make them of child friendly prints on one side and flannel on the other. I then actually machine quilt them about 4" apart in vertical rows, with a simple decorative stitch and finish up by sewing a line of stitching around the outside edge to create a binding effect. I make the quilt sandwhich by the envelope or pillowcase method where I sew around three sides of the sandwhich with my serger and then birth the quilt before doing the machine quilting with a decorative stitch. I own two Bernina's a basic 200 that is light enough weight to take it to workshops and on retreat etc. For my major sewing I purchased a used Bernina artista 185 by trading in the Bernina 1260 I had purchased 20 years ago when I worked for a dealer. It had cost me $1800 with my employee discount. The Artista can also have an embroidery module but I didn't want it. I have two stand alone embroidery machines and a Singer Featherweight I found at a yardsale for just $20. I sometimes use it for piecing.
    Shop around until you find a machine that suits your needs and pocketbook. I have to have the needle down capacity and I love the Bernina knee lift which makes it easy to always keep your hands on the quilt while you are working. I couldn't live without my ability to sew even a few decorative stitches. The one I use the most for my Linus quilts is just a soft wavy pattern that looks great with varigated thread.
    Trying to sew, quilt or read everyday.

  24. #49
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    34,926
    Over sell is why I usually read and learn as much as I can and buy online. Can't be oversold that way. I have two straight stitch only machines. I love them both and I only do straight stitching and FMQ. They both have 9" throats and I can quilt a queen or bigger quilt. My daughter has a straight stitch only machine with 9" harp, she loves it. All three of above machines were different prices and basically are the same.

    Buy only a machine that has what you need now, later you can upgrade if you need more.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  25. #50
    Senior Member dorrell ann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    georgia
    Posts
    556
    I have a mid arm machine on a frame= but the one I sew on all the time comes from walmart -it cost between $200-$300 =they usually last 4-5 years and I am well satisfied.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.