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Thread: Sharon Schamber's basting method...here I come??

  1. #1
    Super Member running1's Avatar
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    Sharon Schamber's basting method...here I come??

    Hello all, I'm preparing a quilt top for layering and want to try Sharon Schamber's method for thread basting.. the one where she uses two boards. My quilt top is close to a double size, or so... so it is much larger than what she shows in her YouTube tutorial.. Here's my question: has anyone tried this method? Do you have any tips for me? I have the boards all ready and think it can work on my dining room table...

    Thanks for your input!! I ALWAYS get good input here!!!
    "... let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us."

  2. #2
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    ​There are several people on QB that use this method. Hopefully they will add some tips.

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Senior Member TwinRiverFarm's Avatar
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    This is the only method I use now for basting! I realize that spray basting and other methods (pinning, etc) may be faster, but I love the way my quilts come out after thread basting. I use first aid adhesive tape to anchor my fabric on the boards, and buy thread from the thrift stores to baste with (hey, it may not be good in my machine, but it gets used up fast when basting and there is no guilt about price!). I can figure out my quilting pattern while basting and the sandwich never shifts while puddling around my machine. The only downside is that the threads can catch under the foot while repositioning the sandwich, so take care to smooth down the fabric when moving from one spot to another. One other tip - use the boards for the top and bottom layers, but roll the batting around a styrofoam pool noodle - it keeps the batting from stretching out of shape and you just unroll it as you go.
    May your blessings be many, your troubles few and your fabric stash endless!

  5. #5
    Super Member katier825's Avatar
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    I use the boards, but I spray baste, not thread baste. Big tip - cover the boards with flannel. It's amazing what a difference that made! I work on a 6' folding table. It's much easier than re-arranging the furniture to use the dining room floor or hauling all my stuff down to the community center to use their tables.

  6. #6
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    I use a card table butted up to my DR table. I use painter's tape to anchor the fabric to the boards and leave the batting free - just pat it in place. I pin mine and have been very pleased with the results.

  7. #7
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I have not use this, will be follwing to see what others think

  8. #8
    Super Member running1's Avatar
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    wow... all great tips! Love the idea of rolling the batting onto a pool tube! I had wondered about keeping batting "organized"... thanks everyone!! I've spent the day trimming threads (do some fabrics ravel worse than others?) and checking a few seams that were not quite straight (sheepish grin...)...

    The back is starched and ready... deep breath... here I go!!
    "... let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us."

  9. #9
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Yes I use this method several times and love it (love being relative to the fact that I HATE basting). I have two tips for you ....


    1) Baste from the back. The reason being is that the diagonal stitches on the top are longer than the stitches on the back (if you use Sharon's herringbone method). If you flip it and stitch from the back, then quilt it from the front, you'll have less stitches that will catch on your presser foot when quilting. I've tried open and closed toe FMQ feet and both of will catch the longer diagonal stitches of the herringbone, but I had much less of a problem when I basted from the back and had only the shorter horizontal stitches.

    2) Use a water soluble thread to baste. You don't have to remove the basting stitches, just stitch over them. If you plan on washing the finished quilt, they'll come out. If you don't plan on washing the quilt, just run a slightly damp wash cloth over it and they'll come out!!

    I love how this method keeps my quilt nice and flat while basting, straight while basting, and holds together really well. And no ... I have not had a problem with the water soluble thread breaking even with frequent handling while quilting.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  10. #10
    Super Member mary quilting's Avatar
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    I use the board and I covered the Broads with Fleece the quilt doesn't slip. I also use safety pin instead sewing. I bought 2 5 ft. folding tables from Walmart

  11. #11
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    The only tip I can give you on basting quilts is Washable School Glue! Find the tutorial here and give it a try on something small. I was hooked after the first try. I will never baste another quilt using anything but washable school glue and I have done some big ones....last one was 96x96. It is just too easy and cheap!

  12. #12
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DogHouseMom View Post
    Yes I use this method several times and love it (love being relative to the fact that I HATE basting). I have two tips for you ....


    1) Baste from the back. The reason being is that the diagonal stitches on the top are longer than the stitches on the back (if you use Sharon's herringbone method). If you flip it and stitch from the back, then quilt it from the front, you'll have less stitches that will catch on your presser foot when quilting. I've tried open and closed toe FMQ feet and both of will catch the longer diagonal stitches of the herringbone, but I had much less of a problem when I basted from the back and had only the shorter horizontal stitches.

    2) Use a water soluble thread to baste. You don't have to remove the basting stitches, just stitch over them. If you plan on washing the finished quilt, they'll come out. If you don't plan on washing the quilt, just run a slightly damp wash cloth over it and they'll come out!!

    I love how this method keeps my quilt nice and flat while basting, straight while basting, and holds together really well. And no ... I have not had a problem with the water soluble thread breaking even with frequent handling while quilting.

    I used the pearl cotton that comes on a ball or size 20 crochet thread to baste with. I just snipped and pulled the threads out as I quilted.

  13. #13
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    I didn't have luck with this method. I had more problems quilting the one i tried it with than any other I've done the old fashioned way. But I think most people like it. I must have done it wrong (although I followed the videos).

  14. #14
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I just use my dining table, clamp backing, batting and top. Using large safety pins to hold together, moving quilt as needed until it is pinned. Works for me.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  15. #15
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    I just use my dining table, clamp backing, batting and top. Using large safety pins to hold together, moving quilt as needed until it is pinned. Works for me.
    That's what i do too (only it's a regular cutting table from Joann's). I may try the glue sometime though.

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    funny you should ask....my DH just finished my boards last night. I had him do 10' boards as I have a king size bed. I think you might find it helpful to staple a strip of fabric the length of the board and make it so it hangs past the boards a good 3-4". My boards are 1x4s....the strip I cut was about 6-7".... DH stapled the length of the 10' board with this strip--reason--when I first wrapped my quilt top to the board I ended up with it being 'off' at the end of the wind...hence I had him staple the strip, this way I can pin the edge of the quilt top (and backing on the other board) to the strip and it won't turn on the wood. I hope this helps. I suppose you could also thumb tack the material to the boards, thus eliminating the need for the strip, but then you'd still have to unthumb tack them which I think the pins and strip would be easier. Good Luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sew Freak View Post
    funny you should ask....my DH just finished my boards last night. I had him do 10' boards as I have a king size bed. I think you might find it helpful to staple a strip of fabric the length of the board and make it so it hangs past the boards a good 3-4". My boards are 1x4s....the strip I cut was about 6-7".... DH stapled the length of the 10' board with this strip--reason--when I first wrapped my quilt top to the board I ended up with it being 'off' at the end of the wind...hence I had him staple the strip, this way I can pin the edge of the quilt top (and backing on the other board) to the strip and it won't turn on the wood. I hope this helps. I suppose you could also thumb tack the material to the boards, thus eliminating the need for the strip, but then you'd still have to unthumb tack them which I think the pins and strip would be easier. Good Luck!
    I think I would put the batt on a board also. Would this keep the batt nice and smooth as you work? Haven't done it yet.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  18. #18
    Junior Member pam7858's Avatar
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    I use this all the time. It's great. Because I have MS and find thread basting hard, I use safety pins instead. Works great

  19. #19
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    I have used this method several times, and love it. I have two long boards for big quilts, as well as shorter ones for small projects. Nice thing too, is that you can SIT to work on it!

  20. #20
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    I basted a quilt for the first time using Sharon's method but used safety pins. I still am not finished quilting did stitch in the ditch around the blocks, now trying to figure out whether to stitch in the ditch around the triangles in the block. Just have a table long enough to hold your boards and the suggestion that TwinRiverFarms "roll the batting around a styrofoam pool noodle" is what I am going to try next time. Do they come in 8ft lengths?
    Cathy Jones, living life to the fullest, and spending time with those that matter the most. I am truly blessed.

  21. #21
    IQ2
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    I used this method on my latest quilt but I pinned instead of basting. I had basted a smaller one previously and it worked ok but I kept catching on the basting threads as I quilted and they either pulled out or pulled the fabric into gathers so I pinned this time and I'm very happy with the results.

    Tip: if you're working on your good dining room table, slide a cutting board under the quilt as you baste or pin so that you don't nick the table with the needle or pin as you work.

    I also put padding on the table and then covered it with a large sheet of flexible vinyl so that the boards could slide easily without pulling the padding off the table.

  22. #22
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    I have not done many quilts but I use Sharon's method and hand quilt. I taped pieces of backing onto the boards so that my quilt and backing fabric do not slip. They adhere very nicely. You can buy prefinished white boards at the lumber yard....so you don't have to do any "protect the fabric from wood" thing.

    This basted quilt has been moved around about a zillion times from chair to "hide it when company comes." Several unknowing guests have grabbed it as a blankie when they got chilled usually with my needle still in it.

    I have experienced some small puckers on the back but think that is because I am not an experienced quilter and I must pull the backing when I am quilting. My experienced quilting buddy has assured me that the puckers will wash out when my quilt is washed.

    I LOVE Sharon's tutorial on her herringbone method. (I must admit that I have to go back and rewatch it every time I finish a project. (Obviously I don't finish my projects very quickly---but they sure look good!).

  23. #23
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sailsablazin View Post
    My experienced quilting buddy has assured me that the puckers will wash out when my quilt is washed.
    Well... puckers don't wash out, if that were the case I'd toss my whole body into the washer. Lol. But the rest of the quilt should pucker up nicely and render the sewn-in puckers practically invisible.

  24. #24
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    I use Sharon's method all the time. I just finished basting a quilt yesterday. I have several different lengths of boards to fit whatever sized project that I'm working on. It works really well for me. One plus is the machine doesn't have to fight with any spray basting that I have run into in the past.
    HTH
    Min

  25. #25
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    What are you buying for the boards?

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