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Thread: Size Problem

  1. #1
    Super Member babyboomerquilter's Avatar
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    I am new, so this is probaby a silly question but here goes...... How on earth do you get a queen or king size quilt in there under the needle,on the sewing machine, it seems theres NOT even enough room.LOL! I want to stipple, but first can someone help me with this problem, it would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
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    veeeeeeeeeeeeeeery difficult. Some will divide the quilt into sections. Look for some discussion of this in the past day or so. Lots of good info there.

  3. #3
    Super Member Izaquilter's Avatar
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    I will lay mine on the floor, roll the right side of the quilt up in a tight hot dog looking roll, pin it with quilt pins, then quilt the center. As I go I have to take if off the machine, unroll enough to quilt again, pin it....I keep doing this until the whole right side is finished. I also balance the left side of the quilt on an ironing board or a big board to take some of the weight off the quilt. It is a little trying at times but it can be done. And if you are like me & make them super king size, I had to hand quilt it because it was way too big & I used a heavier batt because some of them are so thin & I wanted a QUILT, a good & warm quilt! And when you're done you can say "I DID THIS, THE WHOLE THING" :o} Good luck & let us know how it goes.

  4. #4
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Ugh I hear you. roll it up and carefully work it under there. then spread your fingers and work small areas at a time stopping to reposition quilt and reroll. I have a beast of 120x120 Calking that I need to quilts for DS wedding mid February.

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Some roll the quilt, some just puddle it around the table. It really helps to have space behind the machine, to the side and let some fall into your lap too.
    Stop often and reposition no matter which method you use.

    Good basting is also a must :D:D:D

  6. #6
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Another suggestion is to start in the middle and work out, so that you never have the entire quilt bunched into the machine. I managed a king size quilt on a regular machine. Hard work, but I did it.

  7. #7
    Super Member Kappy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyboomerquilter
    I am new, so this is probaby a silly question but here goes...... How on earth do you get a queen or king size quilt in there under the needle,on the sewing machine, it seems theres NOT even enough room.LOL! I want to stipple, but first can someone help me with this problem, it would be much appreciated.
    I have done a queen and vowed "never again" with that said, I bought a book that shows you how to cut out the batting, (imagine the quilt in thirds length ways) in a curving line cut off the outside third of only the batting, I repeat...ONLY the batting, then all you have to squish under the arm of the machine is just the quilt top and backing, quilt the center third. then you re-attach the batting using a basting stitch and quilt the outside third. I tried this on a twin size just to see if it worked and it was definitely easier! Have not tried it on a larger size. Good luck.

  8. #8
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    it is very hard to do kinda like wrestling with an elephant lol

  9. #9
    Senior Member carolstickelmaier's Avatar
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    I have done a few queen and king quilts on my sewing machine. The easiest way is to grid quilt. Usually I do a lattice grid. I mark it first with chalk or pencil and then start in the middle and work out. It is important to have lots of support for the quilt surrounding the machine. card tables or the long narrow plactic from Menards, Home Depot etc work well. Also quilting gloves help you control the fabric.. I bunch the fabric up under the machine
    Good luck and have fun

  10. #10
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    well i have such trouble now that i make my tops in sections. two or three. then quilt them and then sew together. you just must leave extra backing in the "seam" areas.

  11. #11
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    When I quilt on a DSM I quilt large quilts in sections. I use the Marti Michell book - http://www.amazon.com/Machine-Quilti...6008588&sr=8-1

  12. #12
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    It's certainly NOT easy!!! One reason I have tops done but not quilted.

  13. #13
    Senior Member laurlync's Avatar
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    I am quilting a 106" x 106" quilt with high loft polyester batting. I turn my machine sideways so I have more room for my hands and just bunch 1/2 the quilt into the throat and work in 10" - 12" strip at a time all the way across one way and back the other way until I have the first 1/2 done. Then take the quilt out and turn it around and repeat. The first strip across is the most difficult. I tried rolling , but I find it much easier to work with the quilt just bunched. You have to stop often to reposition the quilt and smooth out an area to work on, but it really goes pretty fast if you are just meandering or stippling.

    You can see my setup here http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-52581-1.htm

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