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Thread: Something that makes me go 'hmmmmmmm.......'

  1. #1
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    Something that makes me go 'hmmmmmmm.......'

    Ok so i was pondering an idea.. (Scary thought !!!! )

    I was thinking, back in the day, some quilts were made with 'paper'.. (stay with me here)

    Well, Ive got quite a few string blocks made up on telephone book pages ( getting where im going?)

    So, I wonder if i leave the paper foundation on it will eventually disintegrate right?? I mean after multiple washings it would be gone with the disappearing 'other' sock in the land of limbo.. ( yup i was going there!)

    I mean, it would mean no tearing off paper, but instead have a 'crinkly' sounding quilt for a while till the paper breaks down ... it would break down wouldnt it?? It does in my garden, so why not in the wash?? ( and theres the 'Hmmmmmmm'....... )



    thoughts???? as to Why and why not?? Id like to hear more than "No i wouldnt.."... So why wouldnt you??

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    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    the why not is....
    as it breaks down it will become wet-globs- which will then cause globby lumps in the quilt- and sure 100 washes down the road it may all be gone---but in the mean-time--
    better to tear off the majority of the paper- you don't have to worry about the little bits that stick in the seams- those will disappear fairly soon & completely- but larger pieces will glob up-then take longer to break down.
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    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    I guess I woudn't just for the simple fact that I just wouldn't. But there are water soluble foundation paper out there. Just google it. You don't have to remove it and it will dissappear in the wash.

    Here's one by Sulky but I know I have seen others. http://www.amazon.com/Sulky-Paper-So.../dp/B002LN1CJ2

    Carol Doak (Queen of Paper Piecing) has her own line. http://www.joann.com/carol-doak-s-fo...-pkg/prd34221/
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    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    the why not is....
    as it breaks down it will become wet-globs- which will then cause globby lumps in the quilt- and sure 100 washes down the road it may all be gone---but in the mean-time--
    better to tear off the majority of the paper- you don't have to worry about the little bits that stick in the seams- those will disappear fairly soon & completely- but larger pieces will glob up-then take longer to break down.
    Yup I agree, globs are no good...

    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    I guess I woudn't just for the simple fact that I just wouldn't. But there are water soluble foundation paper out there. Just google it. You don't have to remove it and it will dissappear in the wash.

    Here's one by Sulky but I know I have seen others. http://www.amazon.com/Sulky-Paper-So.../dp/B002LN1CJ2

    Carol Doak (Queen of Paper Piecing) has her own line. http://www.joann.com/carol-doak-s-fo...-pkg/prd34221/
    Another wonderful idea.... thx

  5. #5
    Super Member ShowMama's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    the why not is....
    as it breaks down it will become wet-globs- which will then cause globby lumps in the quilt- and sure 100 washes down the road it may all be gone---but in the mean-time--
    better to tear off the majority of the paper- you don't have to worry about the little bits that stick in the seams- those will disappear fairly soon & completely- but larger pieces will glob up-then take longer to break down.
    I agree with ckcowl. The paper would clump together and cause lumps between the layers. Paper is made of wood and will have fibers, no matter how fine they are. So it's not going to go away completely when sandwiched between layers of fabric. There's no way for the fibers to get out. In your garden the wood fibers just go into the soil. That's why you don't see them when the paper starts breaking down.
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    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    It really isn't that hard to take the paper off ....

    When I'm PPing I do it as I complete each block, and then give it a good pressing. If I waited til the end, it'd be one big UGH!!!!!
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    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    A neat trick that I learned here on the board for removing the paper is to take a cotton swab or a small paintbrush and just wet the seams down and the paper will come off very easily.
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    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
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    I have to agree with ckcowl on this one. I would also be concerned about the ink bleeding through.
    Joyce

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    Then, too, there's the issue of the paper (especially from a phone book) being acidic and what it might do to your quilt fibers while it is breaking down! It might not cause damage in the near term, but would weaken the fabric so that it would not stand the test of time.

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    Not to mention your washing machine! How many are you willing to buy after they clog up.ha. My 90 yr old sister has one and I have it, a beautiful string quilt made on readers digest pages. When she got it all sewed together, she sat and took all the paper off ugh. Her den was like a den.Grin. But the quilt is scrappy and beautiful. One of these days when grandson tells me what to do, I'm gonna take several pictures and put them on here. Barny

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    I'm with auntpiggylpn - just wet the seams and the paper should come off easily.
    Like QuiltE, I take the paper off as I complete a block, usually by soaking it in my bathroom sink for just long enough to get it wet. I use thin plain paper though. Try it on one and if the ink doesn't run, you're good to go. If it does use the q-tip/paintbrush method. Under no circumstances would I try doing it in a washing machine.

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    You can get away without removing the paper and probably be fine. but there are good points about the clumping(having accidently washed paper it does turn into quite a blob)and on a light fabric you may get ink stains. I have used deli wrap as well as phone books for a foundation for strips and found the paper tears off pretty easy. I don't worry about getting every little bit though. they pretty much disolve

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    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    If you're having problems getting the paper to come off, shorten your stitch.

    For PPing I use the shortest stitch on my machine ... and the paper comes off with hardly an effort on my part.
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    Paper, yes. Leaving in? No...unless you have a death wish for your washer....
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    One could try making a pot-holder size "quilt" - just serge the edges - and try washing that a few times to see what would happen.

    I'd kind of like to know if the paper clumps up like tissues/kleenex does when I've forgotten to take it out of a pocket - or if it would just sort of turn into lint .

    Can't say I'm quite curious enough to actually try it myself, though.

    Way back when, people used newspaper for foundation piecing. Wonder if they took the paper off or left it on?

    Have the inks and paper processes changed over the years?

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    I would guess if the item was quilted closely it really wouldn't matter. what little paper was between the quilting lines couldn't go anywhere anyways. If it was tied like a comforter i can see where you could have clumps of paper.

    then again my mom and grandma used a wringer washer so any paper left inside would get the snot beat out of it.

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    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
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    I'd be more concerned about my quilt than the washer. Papers are treated with a number of chemicals in the production process - then add the ink - BLECK! I'm not willing to risk my quilt for that.

    I have used light weight muslin, it worked beautifully. In fact, one of my favorite throws is a string quilt on muslin with no batting and a heavy flannel backing. It's the perfect weight for me right now - cozy, but not too hot. Things get too danged hot all of a sudden every now and again...

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    Super Member alfosa421's Avatar
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    Good Grief YES TAKE THE PAPER OFF!!!!! If you use newspaper it gets dark from the ink in it so imagine what the quilt would look like!! Also I agree with the others who said do it with each square but BE CAREFUL!!! Good luck in your future quilting

  19. #19
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    first, in the "olden" days, the inks used in newspapers had some lead and other toxic stuff in them. It made the ink not run or rub off on your fingers like it does today. And crinkly may not be conducive to cuddly. Just cause you can, doesn't mean you should 8^)

    and since you (and I) compost anyway, what I've done is sit outside on a nice day and pull the papers off and let them land on the grass and compost in that way.

  20. #20
    Super Member Nanaquilts44's Avatar
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    I would not like to use this method unless I removed the paper after completing a section or a block. Like some have said, clumps and ink are not pretty.

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    Super Member weasier22's Avatar
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    What about the ink? That would be my concern. Also think you would get lumps of wet paper. Might be good for a massage! By the way ... I love your "location"!
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    Super Member lisalovesquilting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltE View Post
    It really isn't that hard to take the paper off ....

    When I'm PPing I do it as I complete each block, and then give it a good pressing. If I waited til the end, it'd be one big UGH!!!!!
    Sometimes I wait and take the paper off while watching TV.
    Peace

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    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    Also, do you really want to add that paper residue to your city water system or worse yet, your own septic system?

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    Super Member LindaMRB's Avatar
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    I would not because of the globs others have mentioned.
    More than that though (the globs would eventually go away), I would worry about ink on the paper. A lot of inks nowadays are soy-based so that is not a problem, but you never know.
    Also, I don't wash quilts a lot. I'd hate to wash it a bunch just to get rid of the paper.

  25. #25
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    The larger pieces of paper actually tears off quite easily. A light misting should remove stubborn pieces but I wouldn't worry about little pieces. Old sheets make good foundation blocks in place of the paper.

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