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Thread: Spray Adhesive

  1. #1
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    Spray Adhesive

    I have a can staring at me and afraid to use it. Can someone give me some tips, advice, advantages, or comments about using this in my quilting. Will I make a mess of everything around me when I spray it?

  2. #2
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I have found the overspray to be minimal. I try to spray from the outside toward the middle as much as possible. Spray one half at a time and smooth it down.

    I have wood floors and the overspray just mops up off of it with no problem. It encourages me to mop! I have never had a problem with gumming up needles or anything. It works great for me.

  3. #3
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Do you have spray adhesive or spray basting? If its is spray basting what type /manufacture ? Some perform differently than others.
    There is a good amount of over spray.. so spread sheets or papers around the area. I usually go at least 18 inches past the edge of the item I am quilting with protection. Usually less is better and lightly spray the item. I know when did my first I used way too much as it just did not seem to be sticky .. but it was. Sometimes it does not get tacky right away. I still pin the outter perimeter , as sometimes the edges will lift in the handling and quilting process. I suggest a small sample 12 -18 inches square so you can get a feel for the nature of spray basting , you can judge how much you you really need and it will help get you past the "first time jitters".

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    It is "Temporary Spraay Adhesive" by Sulky

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    I put an old blanket on the table to catch the over spray. I have found, like LoriS said, that doing half, almost sectioning into fourths helps keep it easier and fairly even.

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    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    so far i've done my quilts on my folding JoAnn's table. I center my backing then batting, then top. lift (or now I roll up) my top several times, then spray with Sulky or 505 and fold down or roll down the top to cover, then spray and on and on. then i flip it all over and do the backing.
    now i usually spray the batting although some "rules" somewhere says to spray the fabric only. i just know i've never had a problem doing it my way.

  7. #7
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    First and foremost, check the label and make sure it's washable. Also, do a practice sandwich and see how it behaves in your machine. I've never had a problem, but others have complained of some products gumming up their needle.

  8. #8
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    http://www.sulky.com/adhesives/index_adhesives.php I think I'd do a little more research on the "temporary" part, unless you're able to spray it & quilt it all in the one day.

  9. #9
    Junior Member indycat32's Avatar
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    I use the Sulky KK 2000 brand to baste my quilts. There's not a lot of overspray, it doesn't take a lot, and it generally lasts 3-4 days.

  10. #10
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    I'm interested in permanent spray adhesive for some quilting art projects.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
    I choose to give my life away for things that last forever

  11. #11
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    The best tip I can give you concerning spray basting is don't use it. I use Elmers Liquid Washable/School Glue instead. There are several reasons why it works better (for me at least)....1. Much cheaper 2. No overspray 3. No fumes 4. You put down thin lines of glue directly onto the batting and spread the fabric onto the batting, so you know absolutely that there are no puckers 5. It washes out completely every time 6. It never gums up the needle and no problems stitching even where there were little globs 7. The sandwich does not shift at all. Just my honest opinion

  12. #12
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    I love the results I get from spray basting ... but I HATE using it. There IS overspray .... any time you use an aerosol you will get particles that "drift". The drifting particles will adhere to everything. I refuse to use it indoors ... not even in the garage.

    I'd love to find a spray basting product in a pump spray.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

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    Buckeye Rose, I was interested to read your post saying you use Elmers washable school glue. Do you dilute this to put into a spray bottle or do you drizzel it onto the batting direct from the bottle

  14. #14
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamaiarigby View Post
    Buckeye Rose, I was interested to read your post saying you use Elmers washable school glue. Do you dilute this to put into a spray bottle or do you drizzel it onto the batting direct from the bottle

    I use the school glue directly from the bottle, undiluted....drizzling thin lines about 3-4" apart....directly onto the batting....spread the fabric onto the batting, smoothing from the middle....you can let it air dry (about an hour) or speed up the drying process by ironing it....I do mine on my pool table and about 1/2 of quilt at a time....and let it air dry....then do the other half.....it ends up to be an afternoons work, but so much free time inbetween glue sessions....if the glue blobs out, just smooth it with your finger and keep that wet washrag handy.....by putting the glue on the batting, you know there are no wrinkles or puckers because you can see what you are doing....best method I've found....just need to make sure you get the washable school glue....washes out in warm water when quilt is completed....I've not had stains at all

  15. #15
    Super Member sharoney's Avatar
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    I've never used Sulky spray, but I use basting spray all the time. It is my best friend. I have a blank wall in my garage that I covered with bulletin board cork, and I sandwich quilts on that wall, using basting spray. ( I use Sullivan's, in the pink can) I don't have to crawl around on the floor. I just tack the edges of the backing with thumbtacks, spray it lightly, put the batting on it, lightly spray the batting, and put the top on. On larger quilts, I may have to use a couple of tacks in the top to keep it from coming undone, but I would rather do that than use more spray. It really doesn't take much spray for it to stick well. And it stays together for days. I've never had one come undone. Ater quilting, I wash the quilt.

  16. #16
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    When I have spray basted, I have used the 505 spray. Be careful to not spray too much, you don't need a heavy coat of spray. And, be sure to work in a well ventilated area!

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    I just finished my first quilted throw and learned some really important things about spray basting. I had used it some when doing a quilted kitchen mat for the floor and didn't find there to be much overspray, but there was definitely some so I took it outside to the driveway this time. Used clear packing tape to tape down my backing to the driveway, put my batting on top of the backing to where I was happy with the placement, then rolled down the top third and sprayed the backing (not the batting) and carefully rolled and pressed the batting back onto it. Rolled up the bottom 2/3 and did the same, going slowly. Did the same process to get the quilt top on, except sprayed on the top, not the batting still.

    I could still smell the spray outside, but didn't get the little dizziness I had when I did it in my living room. Was lucky last night and there wasn't any wind, but I could definitely feel the spray on the concrete after I was done.

    Important lesson I learned: Don't try to quilt the sandwich when the spray is still damp. I was overexcited about it and couldn't wait to start and bad bad things happened.

    I read on another thread that you can "quick set" the spray baste by running a hot iron over the top and backing to dry it off. I should've done that, but was just too eager.

  18. #18
    Member Alli's Avatar
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    I have not had much success with sprays. I've tried a few brands. The spray works OK for small projects like a little wall hanging or place-mat. The spray really stinks. The weather has to be perfect-warm, dry and no wind- to do it outside. I have trouble squaring up the project and getting puckers out. So pinning is my choice even though that is boring. A professional long armer is the best solution for me it I can afford it.

  19. #19
    Junior Member narnianquilter's Avatar
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    dritz basting spray has worked really well for me, the only problem I have is on bigger quilts the top or bottom bunches because I have to crawl over it to lay the fabric- however I think this is because I didn't wait for one side to set before I did the other...

  20. #20
    Member Hensandchickens's Avatar
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    I've used 505 with great success on several projects. There is over spray, but it is not hard to clean up. I sometimes put newspaper down, but not always. It does smell weird and I am very sensitive to scented/smelly things and this doesn't bother me at all. It's non-toxic.

  21. #21
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    Make sure you spray in a well ventilated area. I usually wait for a sunny, reasonably warm, dry, wind-free day and do the spraying in the breezeway. Of course, I have to sweep it off first, but that doesn't take long. The quilt top does pick up a bit of surface "stuff" from the breezeway floor, but it shakes right off. I usually hold the spray can about 10 - 12" from the surface of the quilt top or back. Spraying closer than that layers it on too thickly and it is harder to work with.

    NEVER spray near your sewing machine(s) or, for that matter, any machinery. The spray can move into the machinery - where you can't see it - and gum up the works.

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