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Thread: squares to triangles

  1. #1
    Junior Member pester's Avatar
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    Is there a reason behind taking a square marking the diagonal and sewing on either side then cutting between the lines to make a square block from two triangles. Rather than just cutting trangles to sew togeter.

    Other than just different ways to reach the same point is there a reason one way is "better". Thanks

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    You are avoiding stitching bias pieces, many find this method to be more accurate for them :D:D:D

  3. #3
    Super Member KathyAire's Avatar
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    Don't know the reason behind it, but I do know that my machine will eat triangle corners. I like sewing on each side of the pencil line much better than sewing triangles together.

  4. #4
    np3
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    Power Poster np3's Avatar
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    Reason? The bias can't stretch out of shape the way it can when you cut it first.

  5. #5
    Super Member Murphy's Avatar
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    Those bias triangles can be a bear and become mishapen easily. I have done both and prefer squares sewn (smile).

  6. #6
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    the reason behind it is...if you cut your fabric square in half diagonally you just created a bias edge...very stretchy! when you (try) to sew 2 bias edges together they tend to stretch out of shape and you struggle. sewing on the line, make 2 blocks at once and no bias to deal with, everything stays nice and square.

  7. #7
    Junior Member pester's Avatar
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    Thanks I'm getting the hang of keeping a good seam allowance off the pencil line rather than the cut edge. Thanks I fiqured their was a good reason so thanks for shareing.

  8. #8
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. I wondered that too.

  9. #9
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Plus, I don't want to cut all of those triangles.

  10. #10
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    I saw one tute on how to make a massive lot of quarter square triangles.

    Starch like mad and iron when almost dry. Cut squares a little bit large.

    You put two different colors of squares together, outside in. Then sew ALL AROUND THE FOUR SIDES.

    Then cut from top corner to opposite bottom corner. Open and press, not iron them. 4 triangles easy and ready to sew.

  11. #11
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amma
    You are avoiding stitching bias pieces, many find this method to be more accurate for them :D:D:D
    not to mention, a lot faster!

  12. #12
    QuiltingLee's Avatar
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    I saw that too. i cant remember who did the tutorial.. i think was it missouri star quilt company? on their youtube site? their tip was using spray starch to stabilize the bias edges

  13. #13
    QuiltingLee's Avatar
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  14. #14
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    Thanks!

  15. #15
    Senior Member hevemi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramona Byrd
    I saw one tute on how to make a massive lot of quarter square triangles.

    Starch like mad and iron when almost dry. Cut squares a little bit large.

    You put two different colors of squares together, outside in. Then sew ALL AROUND THE FOUR SIDES.

    Then cut from top corner to opposite bottom corner. Open and press, not iron them. 4 triangles easy and ready to sew.
    To add to the previous: Cut squares 1 1/2" larger than the final size you want i.e. Cut 4" sq if you want 2 1/2 cut qst

  16. #16
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pester
    Is there a reason behind taking a square marking the diagonal and sewing on either side then cutting between the lines to make a square block from two triangles. Rather than just cutting trangles to sew togeter.

    Other than just different ways to reach the same point is there a reason one way is "better". Thanks
    For me because it is easier and faster. Try both ways and see which works best for you. I am sure you will find doing the square is the one for you. Trying to sew a 1/4" seam on the bias is the pits, as far as I'm concerned.

  17. #17
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    Yes, it helps eliminate the bias problem and stretching

  18. #18
    Senior Member MarthaT's Avatar
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    For me the most accurate and easy way to make half square triangles is to use Thangles papers. I used them for the quilt in my avatar and it was a lifesaver with all those triangles. Saves on fabric too. www.thangles.com
    You just cut strips of fabric the width needed, layer them with the paper, and then sew on the sewing lines and cut on the cutting lines. Press while the paper strips are still attached and it will be even less likely to stretch on the bias seam. It really is worth the money to buy them. Anyone else found them helpful?

  19. #19
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pester
    Is there a reason behind taking a square marking the diagonal and sewing on either side then cutting between the lines to make a square block from two triangles. Rather than just cutting trangles to sew togeter.

    Other than just different ways to reach the same point is there a reason one way is "better". Thanks
    It helps keep the bias from stretching and makes it a little easier stitching. :D

  20. #20
    Super Member Nolee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pester
    Is there a reason behind taking a square marking the diagonal and sewing on either side then cutting between the lines to make a square block from two triangles. Rather than just cutting trangles to sew togeter.

    Other than just different ways to reach the same point is there a reason one way is "better". Thanks
    I am thinking that you don't realize this is done when TWO square pieces are going to be sewn together. When you cut the center line, you get two triangles with no bias to deal with. I got the feeling from your note that you may have been asking why you have to do this on a single square. Never heard those directions for cutting one single square, only sets. If I am wrong, I apologize.

  21. #21
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    I just tried this and really like it. It seems so much faster. I don't like writing on fabric. It shifts on me.

  22. #22

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    There's one other important reason that I didn't see mentioned. When you just cut the square in half and sew it, your square will be smaller than you want it to be. Half-square triangle squares are 7/8" bigger to compensate for the seam allowance that you take out of the middle. There are some great tools out that help with these. I like to use Thangles if I need more than 4 triangles (2 squares). You cut strips of fabric the measurement of one side, then lay the Thangle on top. It is paper and has all the stitching and cutting lines clearly marked. Once you've sewn all the lines, then you cut them apart and the paper tears off. They come in sizes 1 1/2" on up so you just buy the size you need for the finished square, and Presto! they are all cut correctly. There are very good instructions with each package and a video on Thangles.com.

    I'm working on a quilt that needs many of these triangle squares and have done it a little differently. I don't cut the fabric strips, just lay the Thangles side by side on the uncut fabric to get the number I need. It depends on the size, but I can get 10 2" finished squares from one paper strip. I tape them together in a couple of places, then pin to fabric. By lining up the stitching lines you can sew 40 squares with just 4 Thangles and long rows of stitching. Doing it this way is a real time saver. Don't we all need that!
    :D :-D

  23. #23

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    Martha, what do you mean by "in my avatar"? I've seen that phrase several times, but have no clue of the meaning. No, I didn't see the movie.

  24. #24
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    thanks

  25. #25
    Super Member sewNso's Avatar
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    avatar is the picture of 'us' we post. and i love thangles too. just saw an old ww11 pattern called jacobs ladder i am going to try to convert to a 'thangles doable.'

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