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Thread: stack & wack vs 1 block wonder vs kaleidoscope

  1. #1
    Member speedyball's Avatar
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    I hate to sound ignorant, but what is the difference? Most look the same, but maybe it is the way they are attached to each other?

  2. #2
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I don't know the answer either. sorry. I will be watching this thread for me to know also.

  3. #3
    Super Member mimom's Avatar
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    this is a kaleidoscope, a stack and wack with only 4 pieces and I think one block wonders are 6 pieces to a block and all different sizes all put together, someone correct me if I am wrong
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  4. #4
    Senior Member qbquilts's Avatar
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    I think that "stack & whack" and "1 block wonder" are brand names for different patterns/designs. Both are made similarly - by layering fabric repeats on top of each other and cutting out identical pieces to use in a block to create a kaleidoscope effect. I want to say that "stack & whack" is older than "1 block wonder", but that could just be the order I first heard them. I've seen these quilts done with as few as 4 pieces in the block and even more than 8.

    Pulling out my "Magic Stack-n-Whack Quilts" book. It covers a variety of blocks - Half-Square Triangles, 45 degree Triangles, 45 degree diamonds, 60 degree triangles, 60 degree diamonds. Looking at the pictures, the quilts call for the main fabric and a background fabric.

    Remember the 1-block wonder's I've seen, I think the quilt just uses one block (the hexagon or the 60 degree diamonds to make a hexagon) and only uses the main fabric.

    I could be wrong in my classification of the two, but from what I've seen, this is what I've observed.

  5. #5
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewingsuz
    I don't know the answer either. sorry. I will be watching this thread for me to know also.
    Me too.....and the 4 patch posy seems to have the same concept too :roll:

  6. #6
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    This is my take. Stack and Whack and OBW both are kalidescope blocks, in that a single design element is cut and repeated to form a concentric pattern. Both S&W and OBW can be made from Hexagons, octagons and/or squares. The set up technique is the same. Find the pattern repeats in your fabric and cut the number of repeats needed to make your block. In a S&W, the resultant blocks are set with contrasting sashing or other methods/patterns where the individual blocks are highlighted, as mimom has shown (Pretty Quilt!!). In a OBW, the blocks are assembled without sashing etc. The assembled blocks are placed based on the dominant color of the block. The individual block isn't highlighted. OBW are often Hexagons. Do a search for OBW in the picture area of this board. Easier to see a pic than explain. Clear as mud?

  7. #7
    Junior Member qltncat's Avatar
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    Maybe it's because the One Block Wonder doesn't have really defined blocks like the Stack-N-Whack?

    The Stack-N-Whack pix above has 12 definite blocks, while a One Block Wonder seems to flow sort of like a watercolor quilt.

    I hope I make sense. :-)

    Linda

  8. #8
    Super Member trisha's Avatar
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    All I know is that I am addicted to OBW's!!!! They are hexagons made with the 60 degree ruler. And it is more fun than anything!!! That's my story and I am sticking to it.

  9. #9
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    OBW's can be made with 6 - 60 degree triangles which make a hexagon or you can also make them with 8 - 45 degree triangles which make an octagon. A small square made from 4 triangles is needed in between the octagons to complete the block. The small triangles get sewn to the corners of the octagon to make it be a square block.

  10. #10
    Super Member scowlkat's Avatar
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    Paperprincess has nailed it right on the head! Excellent explanation in my opinion!

  11. #11
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    Stack & Whack and OBW's are both types of kaleidoscope blocks. S&W blocks can vary in looks and form and are set with sashing in between the blocks. More than one fabric is used in the blocks. S&W is the term coined by Bethany Reynolds in her book. OBW blocks are all made identically from one fabric. It is the way the fabric is cut that makes the kaleidoscope variations. OBW blocks are sewn together without sashing. OBW is the term coined bt Maxine Rosenthal in her book.

  12. #12
    Super Member Katrine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedyball
    I hate to sound ignorant, but what is the difference? Most look the same, but maybe it is the way they are attached to each other?
    K3n explains it very well in the intro to the Topic List "One Block Wonders, Kaleidoscopes, etc, here

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/virtual_section_list.jsp

  13. #13
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    the difference is who is making it...which book they are using. different people designed quilts using a specific technique...and called it what they thought was a good name...there are differences...a stack and wack you stack up layers of fabric cut it all together, rearrange the pieces and re-sew them...so stack & wacks are not always kaleidoscopes...
    one block wonders and kaleidoscopes are pretty much the same; some times (depending on the pattern you have) the one block wonders are put together ...one block at a time...where as (some kaleidoscopes) are constructed in rows instead of in individual blocks

  14. #14
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    the difference is who is making it...which book they are using. different people designed quilts using a specific technique...and called it what they thought was a good name...there are differences...a stack and wack you stack up layers of fabric cut it all together, rearrange the pieces and re-sew them...so stack & wacks are not always kaleidoscopes...
    one block wonders and kaleidoscopes are pretty much the same; some times (depending on the pattern you have) the one block wonders are put together ...one block at a time...where as (some kaleidoscopes) are constructed in rows instead of in individual blocks
    Hexagon OBW are sewn into half hex's first, then pin the two halves together when you lay out your design for the top. After all is arranged, then you sew the half hexs into rows. When the rows get sewn together then the whole hexagon appears. The hexs nest together, staggered across the whole top, usually clumping same colors together. Octagon OBWs get made into a square blocks, adding those little triangles onto the corners. Then when all the blocks are sewn into rows and the rows together those little triangles make a square inbetween the oct's. OBWs can be made with different fabrics in the same quilt top, but usually are from one fabric print.

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    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    thanks to all... i'd been wondering about this, too.

  16. #16
    k3n
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katrine
    Quote Originally Posted by speedyball
    I hate to sound ignorant, but what is the difference? Most look the same, but maybe it is the way they are attached to each other?
    K3n explains it very well in the intro to the Topic List "One Block Wonders, Kaleidoscopes, etc, here

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/virtual_section_list.jsp
    Kaledioscope quilts is the generic term for ALL of these types of quilt.

    Stack n whack is a term coined by (and trade mark owned by) Bethany Reynolds. Her technique typically includes sashing between the blocks. She uses many forms of kaleidoscope - squares, hexagons, octogans, fans, strips etc.

    One Block Wonder is the term (not trademarked) used by Maxine Rosenthal to describe her version of kaleidoscope quilts made from EITHER hexagons OR octogans where the individual blocks are set together WITHOUT sashing to create an overall design.

    There are also kaleidoscope quilt designs that don't use a layered stack of identical pattern repeats, traditional block designs, usually octogans, using several different fabrics to create the 8 wedges that make up the block.

    There is a also the technique called Kool Kaleidoscopes by Ricky Tims that uses templates cut from strip sets sewn together to create unique designs.

    Check out the link Katrine posted for more information. :-D

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