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Thread: Stack and Whack

  1. #1
    Senior Member quilt-fanatic's Avatar
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    I'm getting ready to begin a stack and whack and was wondering if anyone has any 'helpful hints'? I know there will be some waste - but with 7 yds, I can use it somewhere. Need help from some of you experienced quilters, please.

  2. #2
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    I haven't made one yet but thought I'd do a quick search for tips for you...
    It looks like the biggest is picking the right material for it (good amount of background between prints) and to not wash the fabric before you cut. You want the sizing in it. It kills me to not prewash material before quilting but that's what they say to do for this one - I'll trust it.

    I'm planning to make one but sadly it will have to wait awhile. I have a lot to get done before I can quilt for *fun* lol. (xmas presents & dresser scarves)

    Oh - I did find a link to this search page which is really massive. You might find some good advice in there as well.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/virtual...jsp?vsnum=1006

  3. #3
    Super Member whinnytoo's Avatar
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    Ive done many stack and whacks and what I find helps alot is to press the fabrics well, then align everything using pins to make sure the print lines up perfectly.......
    if using the whole width of the fabric, I cut it along the fold line. Its easier to line up the narrower widths, rather than the whole 44".
    Remove pins before cutting........ then keep your 'waste' pieces stacked as well, you may be able to get a second set of blocks out of it, or use 4 layers to do stack n whack 'squared'. Great use of what would be 'waste'.

  4. #4
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    Starch, starch and more starch. LOL

  5. #5
    Super Member maryb119's Avatar
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    I prewash and press my fabric. Then I cut the 7 yard piece in half LENGHTWISE and set aside half. Look for the repeat in the print and cut the repeat in the same place in the design. Sometimes, you have to cut everyother repeat to get the piec large enough. You need 8 matching pieces. then stack the cut pieces on top of each other. Insert a pin at the same place on each design in three or four seperate places. Cut the fabric into strips and then into suqares and then into triagles. This will give you 8 identical triangles for your pinwheel block. I used to teach Stack and Whack. it is an adicting pattern. The other half of the fabric is used for the borders of the quilt. Cut them lenghtwise too.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Rntraveler's Avatar
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    I have done several Stack and Whack and have washed the fabric first in all of them. The trick to any quilt is starching and ironing them .... it is not a problem to wash the fabric first.

  7. #7
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    My problem with the cutting is when yiu cut the strips and pieces. How do you determine the size of each bloc? Do you fussy cut each strip?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Rntraveler's Avatar
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    You really need to have a pattern or someone show you. S&W is not a fussy cut pattern.. actually pretty precise to get it to match up right.
    It's a matter of how you cut and stack the repeats. Then you cut with a ruler the size you are using.. this is determined by the pattern.
    My first one I did take a class on and that helped alot to understand what they are doing. After the first class I have done several with the pattern books... I use Bethany Reynold's but I think there are others out there..

  9. #9
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    Thanks for your help. Maybe a class would help.

  10. #10
    Super Member trisha's Avatar
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    type in stack and whack in the search and you will find all kinds of posts on it.

  11. #11
    Super Member Kitsapquilter's Avatar
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    I always work with a narrower width of fabric (not the whole width). I tear about 18 inches down the length. Flat head pins are a must. And only work on one block at a time. This is not a pattern to do chain sewing with.

  12. #12
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    I am so glad that what I read wasn't right about not prewashing the material. I really don't like to use unwashed material when I sew. All that time and effort down the drain if it shrinks funny and all :(

    A OBW is on my to do list for early next year.

  13. #13
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    Which one are you going to do. I did the original pinwheel which at that time came in a pattern so didn't have to buy the book.
    Best hint I can give is get some paper plates and put each block in the plate. It helps keep all sorted out and harder to mix up.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Quilter Day-by-Day's Avatar
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    I just finished a top that is a stack-n-whack and I washed all my fabric first. Mine is more like stained glass. No 2 are alike. Stack 6 squares and cut 3 times differant ways.

  15. #15
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holice
    Which one are you going to do. I did the original pinwheel which at that time came in a pattern so didn't have to buy the book.
    Best hint I can give is get some paper plates and put each block in the plate. It helps keep all sorted out and harder to mix up.
    I used the paper plates for my OBW, it did make it easier to keep them sorted.

    If you slightly distort your fabric when washing or pressing, your fabric will not line up correctly for stack and whack or OBW just saying :D:D:D

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitsapquilter
    I always work with a narrower width of fabric (not the whole width). I tear about 18 inches down the length. Flat head pins are a must. And only work on one block at a time. This is not a pattern to do chain sewing with.
    Linda, are you saying "straight pins are a must"????? or are you saying specifically "flat head" ??????? pins are a must. I am also taking a class on Stack N Whack. The teacher uses flat head pins.
    I don't have any. Do I need to buy some???? If yes, how are they different from a rounded head straight pin?

  17. #17
    Senior Member Rntraveler's Avatar
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    Flat head pins are almost a necessity..

    I always wash fabric, (in the washer and dryer and fold as it comes out of the dryer), before putting it in my stash at home and when doing a pattern like the stack/whack, starch and iron it before cutting. "I " haven't had any problems with it being off grain or messing up the ability to line up.. maybe it's the fabric but I would not want to cut and sew any fabric without washing and drying.

  18. #18
    Super Member watson's mom's Avatar
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    I recently read an article about newly purchased fabric. Because there is an 'epidemic' infestation of bed bugs going around, it is recommended that ALL fabric be put into the dryer on hot, as soon as it is brought home, for about 20 minutes to kill all larvae or eggs that may have attached itself to the fabric when it was being shipped here in containers. Not a nice topic but better safe that sorry. It would just kill me to know my very large stash had tenants.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rntraveler
    Flat head pins are almost a necessity..

    I always wash fabric, (in the washer and dryer and fold as it comes out of the dryer), before putting it in my stash at home and when doing a pattern like the stack/whack, starch and iron it before cutting. "I " haven't had any problems with it being off grain or messing up the ability to line up.. maybe it's the fabric but I would not want to cut and sew any fabric without washing and drying.
    Thank you Rntraveler, I will get some. Can you tell me more about the benefit of using the Flat Head pins specifically?

  20. #20
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    The flathead pins are for when you put your ruler on your fabric to cut, it lays flatter, so you don't tend to move the ruler. If you tried to put your ruler over round head pins, it would wobble, and you won't get a straight cut.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mailmanldy
    The flathead pins are for when you put your ruler on your fabric to cut, it lays flatter, so you don't tend to move the ruler. If you tried to put your ruler over round head pins, it would wobble, and you won't get a straight cut.
    Okay. Thank you. I will get some.

  22. #22
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    Believe Missouri Star Quilt Co. has a very nice Stack and Wjack patter.

  23. #23
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsb38327
    Quote Originally Posted by Mailmanldy
    The flathead pins are for when you put your ruler on your fabric to cut, it lays flatter, so you don't tend to move the ruler. If you tried to put your ruler over round head pins, it would wobble, and you won't get a straight cut.
    Okay. Thank you. I will get some.
    You may also find that besides using these in a stack and whack/OBW quilts, they are nice for piecing too. They are finer and lay nice and flat when laying on your sewing machine bed too :D:D:D

  24. #24
    Senior Member quilt-fanatic's Avatar
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    In stead of the flat head pins, we basted our strips prior to cutting the 6 layers of fabric to make individual pinwheels. Quilt is at quilters now but will post picture when it is finished.

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