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Starching and soft/flimsy fabric

Starching and soft/flimsy fabric

Old 01-04-2016, 12:55 PM
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Default Starching and soft/flimsy fabric

I found the perfectly printed fabric to add to my Blooming 9-patch quilt top....BUT....it is so soft and flimsy that even trying to starch with spray starch is next to impossible. It moves and ripples and behaves horribly. I am currently out of liquid starch (can't find anymore at WalMart). So I have this idea and am wondering if it might work...what if I hang it over the shower curtain rod and spray it with spray starch until very wet...then let it dry. After it is dry, I was hoping that it would be stiff enough to handle and I could press it into submission! And no, replacing the fabric isn't an option at this point as it goes in the middle and the remaining outer fabrics are based off of the previous one, very difficult to find large flowery prints that fit the bill. I just want to know if spray starching and air drying will achieve some degree of stiffness.
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Old 01-04-2016, 01:25 PM
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I use Walmart spray starch called Magic Sizing. It is the only one I use. I stock up so I will never run out of it.
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Old 01-04-2016, 01:53 PM
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You can also layer the spray starch. A fan helps speed drying between layers. I doubt the spray starch will be as strong as liquid starch, even if you saturate, but it might be enough. If you think about it, when you dilute Sta-Flo you dilute it to different strengths. Spray starch has to always be a lighter starch solution simply because it has to fit through the spray nozzle. But, worth a try.

Incidentally, many grocery stores also carry Sta-Flo. Look for it in the laundry area, usually on the most bottom shelf.
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Old 01-04-2016, 02:04 PM
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I guess I would be more concerned about how the fabric will wear after the quilt is completed. I think I would use a featherweight iron on stabilizer. It will add body and strengthen it.
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Old 01-04-2016, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
I guess I would be more concerned about how the fabric will wear after the quilt is completed. I think I would use a featherweight iron on stabilizer. It will add body and strengthen it.
My thoughts exactly. The stabilizer will remain where the starch will wash out. You could end up with part of the quilt coming apart much quicker than the rest. If it's super flimsy, I would consider using a medium grade fabric stabilizer. Take a piece to a Hancock's or Joann's and let the sales clerks help you with your choice.
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Old 01-04-2016, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
I guess I would be more concerned about how the fabric will wear after the quilt is completed. I think I would use a featherweight iron on stabilizer. It will add body and strengthen it.
this was my first thought, too.
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Old 01-04-2016, 08:38 PM
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yes, starch will wash out and a fine stabilizer will do the trick better
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Old 01-04-2016, 11:30 PM
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Agree about the starch vs iron-on interfacing or stabilizer. There, we've all decided for you! Wasn't that easy?
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Old 01-05-2016, 12:08 AM
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I would use light weight stabiliser not spray starch as the starch will wash out and leave a flimsy patch which may not hold up without support to quilting.
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Old 01-05-2016, 04:28 AM
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A light weight stablizer will work well for this use because it will wash and wear well-far better than the fabric that is too light. I have used it in garment construction and collars,cuffs and facings all looked great even after far more washings than your quilt will ever receive. The purpose of starch is to provide stability during the cutting and stitching process and is not intended to be permanent.
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