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Thread: Storing fabric

  1. #26
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    Never store fabric in plastic bins, formaldhyde gasses will form. Fabric needs to breath, so which ever way you decide to store your fabric keep this in mind. I store my fabric in metal wire bins attached to the wall in my sewing room closet.
    These were purchased from Lowes, easy to install. They work great and gives me great storage and easy access.

  2. #27
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    To solve the problem of dust on fab stored on open shelves...I purchased clear plastic on roll from JoAnn's and just like in the grocery stores in front of open freezer, I stapled on 2/4, nailed to edge of top self and then cut into about 15" strips from floor to wood strip, can get my hand on the shelves and see fab but keeps most of dust out......

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I believe that the ruler method is used in place of the mini bolt boards. For the mini bolt- you fold the fabric again (selvages to the factory fold edge)so that it measures about 11 inches wide. You start rolling/ folding the length of the fabric around the mini bolt until it is all wound on like the fabric bolts at the store but smaller. In the ruler method you use a 6 X 12 or longer ruler in place of the mini bolt board. The difference is when you have the fabric all folding/rolled around the ruler you carefully pull the ruler out and store the folded fabric on the shelf. Those who ruler fold, feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.
    Good description Tartan. This is the way I do mine and I then stand it on edge in dresser drawers. I used to lay it in the drawers until I learned this method here on QB. Found out I could store twice as much in the same space! Oh, drat! Had to go shopping to get enough fabric to keep a partial drawer standing up. LOL Anyway, it works great. I keep FQs, strips, squares, and UFO blocks in the stackable plastic drawers from WalMart. I still keep anything that is not quilt cotton in plastic tubs, but I don't have much of that anymore. I don't like cardboard; it has to many spaces for critters, especially cockroaches which love to eat the glue.

    Anyway, as someone else said, the main thing is to keep your fabric out of direct sunlight and reasonably protected from dust.
    Shirley in Arizona

  4. #29
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    Hi,

    I have about 50 clear plastic shoe boxes that houses a whole lot of fabric. Some of that fabric has been there 20 years, and is still very useable. I keep fat quarters in boxes cut down so I can see the fabric, and baskets for jelly rolls and other precuts.
    Anita in Northfield, MN

  5. #30
    Senior Member rj.neihart's Avatar
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    I store my fabric two different ways. The smaller pieces, those I can fold into a square, go into a small bookshelf, stacked in as close to color coordination I can get them. The larger pieces of fabric are placed onto cardboard strips - I took boxes and cut out wide enough pieces so I could fold my fabric over each piece. Then I put those upright, into a large book case. I can see the colors, fabric choices are quicker, and I feel organized!

  6. #31
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I store my fabric in plastic containers, fabric containers, sitting on shelving, in doctor bags, in dresser drawers and in a storage unit (like a bookcase with doors on it). I like the fabric containers, but I can't see what's inside. There is a place on the outside to slide a piece of paper with the name of what is inside into, but I've never done that. I think I should do that today. I have 12 of them. They are quite big and I have them stacked and have to go through each of them to find the one I need. I must be the laziest person alive! It would take 5 minutes to fix this problem. But I feel the most comfortable with my fabric stored in the fabric containers. They are hard and stand about 6" tall. I bought them from Fons and Porter. Excellent quality.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  7. #32
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    I use the large plastic storage shelves in my sewing room. My fabric is ruler folded and stacked by color. Scraps are in large plastic laundry hampers with holes in the sides. Fat quarters are boxed in plastic shoe boxes, by color, and stacked under my quilting table.

  8. #33
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I believe it's only the soft plastic bags that outgas formaldehyde; the hard plastic bins are okay. Some people drill holes in the plastic bins to allow for air flow. I don't do that and have not encountered any problems so far (years). The one thing you do *not* want to do is store fabric in a closed container with moisture; that will cause mold.

  9. #34
    Super Member roserips's Avatar
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    My dream way of fabric storage is a large walk in closet with adjustable shelving from floor to ceiling on all walls. Then have my fabric folded so I can see everything on the shelf. Still a work in progress....

  10. #35
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    I, too, live on Long Island and my quilt room is in the full, finished basement. I keep a dehumidifier going constantly...all my fabrics are stored on Ikea Billy Bookcases and Expedit shelving system with no problems. BTW, Tashana, where on the island do you live? Lynnie and I are trying to get a group of L.I. board members together for maybe a bit of a luncheon. Lynnie is in Islip, I'm in Mastic Beach.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tashana View Post
    Since my sewing room is in the basement and Long Island has lots of humidity I store my fabrics in plastic shoe boxes. I am thinking of getting a dehumidifier later but for now plastic it is!

  11. #36
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    I love all your ideas and suggestions and I keep meaning to sort/tidy my fabrics before I go mad in yet another lqs or at a quilt show!!!!!

    Youve inspired me, thank you,

  12. #37
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    What is folding on 6 X 24 ruler. Never heard of it

  13. #38
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Here's a Youtube video on folding fabric over a ruler:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rkTlaMqRlwo

  14. #39
    Senior Member quilting in my60s's Avatar
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    I have two cabinets with doors. Inside one cabinet are shelves that I put my plastic shoeboxes (without) lids sometimes I need to stack the shoe boxes. One cabinet has the louvered (spelling?) doors and two large drawers at the bottom. My fabric is hidden from sunlight and dust and can breathe because no lid on shoe boxes and my doors never close completely (too much stuff in it). I got my cabinets from JC Penney's catalog in the bathroom section (this was 4 years ago). My scraps go into a big plastic tub under my cutting table, then sorted in large ziploc bags according to seasons, color, designer etc. Hope we given you lots of ideas!
    quilting with my dogs

  15. #40
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    Never store fabric in cardboard boxes as it will stain your fabric and the stain is then hard to wash out. When I moved, that's what I did. Lesson learned.

  16. #41
    Super Member Lucy90's Avatar
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    I stored my fabric in plastic bins and had no problems. I just recently bought a cabinet for fabric so I can see what I have. I like this method better & will try the ruler method for folding. Buying boards is way above my budget as I have many small pieces.

  17. #42
    Senior Member Pepita's Avatar
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    I too have used plastic tubs to store fabric. I too had trouble with the odor in the fabric. I don't think the tubs smelled very much, but a closed plastic tub has problems. Here near Houston it is hot and damp. Then I stored my fabric (in my family room--no space left) and I had the metal shelving that you can get at Home Depot or Lowes. I got large baskets and placed them on their sides, the open end facing the room. Then I stacked the fabric by color in the baskets. Well, I needed more space! My kids go to college, and I get the littlest room in the house, Yea! So I use the shelves, with Elna shelves below. I have 4 sets of them and they are metal mesh. I get air circulation, and can easily access the fabric. The upper part where the top of the shelves (metal)I have all sorts of supplies, orphan blocks, etc. stored there. I have on top of the shelves some of the large baskets, filled with yarn, quilt tops, and so on.
    I have found that the problem with wood is that it is wood. The wood will bleed into the fabric if it isn't moved regularly. You may be able to line it and solve this problem. This has been the answer to my problem, but it also means that the room is pretty stuffed! I need to stop buying fabric or what ever until i use some of it up!
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  18. #43
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    I was using plastic drawers and decorated cardboard boxes--and while I still have those tuck around the sewing room, I realized that most of my stuff was heaped in a corner in the sack it came home in and I never knew what I really had. So I bought a china cabinet at an auction--the lower part is solid doors that hide things like freezer paper, template plastic, some fusible, etc, and the upper part has nice glass doors that allow me to see what fabric I have for projects and still keep it dust free. It just seems so much nicer to work now. I do use plastic shelves for the scraps still without any problem.

  19. #44
    Senior Member batikmystique's Avatar
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    I use clear plastic tubs with locking lids. I'm able to see what is in each tub while keeping out the dust, plus they stack well. I haven't noticed any plastic smell, but for those that have mentioned it try placing a dryer sheet in the tub and change as needed.
    Creative clutter is better than idle neatness.

  20. #45
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    I found these directions for the Ruler Folding method - hope this helps:

    http://turningturning.com/tutorial-folding-fabric/


    Linda

    Sew little time and sew many ideas

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