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Thread: Straight of grain

  1. #26
    Senior Member stitchntimesewing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laalaaquilter
    Why should I care if the fabric is straight of grain? I've been reading the 'torn vs cut' thread for the pros and cons of that and it all seems to come back to getting the fabric straight on the grain but no one has explained why it needs to be straight when I'm going to cut it a million ways and sew it five ways from Sunday.
    Here! Here! I totally agree with you lol....

  2. #27
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I just fabric in half square up the end and start cutting. Works for me.
    Good luck figuring which person is right.

  3. #28
    Super Member laalaaquilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle
    I just fabric in half square up the end and start cutting. Works for me.
    Good luck figuring which person is right.
    I don't think 'right' is the best word in this instance lol

    I saw the link with the video of how to get it straight and it works well, I just was wondering why to take the trouble.

    Now I know ;-)

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by laalaaquilter
    Why should I care if the fabric is straight of grain? I've been reading the 'torn vs cut' thread for the pros and cons of that and it all seems to come back to getting the fabric straight on the grain but no one has explained why it needs to be straight when I'm going to cut it a million ways and sew it five ways from Sunday.
    Go to Sharon Pederson on the Quilt Show daily Blog. Sharon has a video about the straight of the grain.
    I was taught in 4-H and Home Ecs. and by my mother about the straight of the grain. if it isn't on the straight of the grain it's on the bias and often times stretches too much. I would recommend viewing this video for all concerned about the straight of the grain.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThreadHead
    Torn is usually straighter.
    Take a yard of material and fold it- don't worry about the ends yet--- make sure there are no wrinkles or it is not skewed in the Middle -- the ends will probably not be even and this is where I even them up.
    Syl
    Ditto this is exactly what I do before I start cutting. Most fab. you purchase even in LQS or other fabric shops the ends may look even but when you make sure the fold is even and all wrinkles out of the fab. selvg. even, you will have uneven ends almost always. I always even my up before I start cutting, or I end up with problems somewhere while cutting.

  6. #31
    Senior Member ljorange's Avatar
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    Have you ever bought a pair of pants that never hang right and are difficult to iron because they never lie flat or "feel right"? That's because they weren't cut right on the grain. Pieces just fit better when cut on the grain.

  7. #32
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    was taught always to get grain straight-------unless lampshade making ,as the object would lay/wear flat and not "wobbly, think tiny pieces don't really matter.

  8. #33
    Super Member Central Ohio Quilter's Avatar
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    I always have my fabric on the straight of grain. That is the way I was taught to sew and I have always followed it since then. Everything fits better, looks better and hangs better.

    However, I do not tear my fabric. I pull a thread and then cut along that pull. This gets you a perfect straight of grain. Then, if the sides don't align up correctly, I pull along the bias until the sides do align correctly.

    I could not imagine trying to sew on a border that was not on the straight of grain. I would be afraid it would end up all wobbly! Ok, so MAYBE it doesn't make as much of a difference with small pieces, but to me that is kind of like saying an EXACT 1/4 inch seam is not going to make that much of a difference. Maybe that one being off won't, but after 10 or 12 pieces, it will make a difference.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    Quote Originally Posted by CompulsiveQuilter
    ??? So to make sure it's straight on grain ... before cutting strips you would tear off a bit and line up the two sides and re-fold the yardage? Is that right?
    I don't like tearing fabric. It leaves microscopic damage up to 2 inches from the edge of the tear. This is especially true when tearing cross-grain (across the width of the fabric), as would be done in a fabric shop. Tearing along the straight-grain does less damage to the fabric.

    For quilting purposes, it is not critical to always be exactly on-grain to the thread. It's more important to be close to on-grain for piecing. For example, you want the edges of your quilt top to be on-grain so they don't stretch out of shape from handling during sandwiching, quilting and binding. Bias edges must be handled very carefully to avoid distortions. For cutting out strips and pieces, it's enough to be close to on-grain; it doesn't have to be perfect!

    With garments, grain is extremely important in order for fabrics to drape properly over the body. Quilt tops that are made out of many small pieces of fabric are going to have grain lines going every which way. Keeping strips and pieces cut close to grainlines helps ensure piecing accuracy so all pieces fit together in the end.

    Edit: I would add that most quilters do not tear fabric to determine straight-of-grain. It's enough to "eyeball" it by lining up selvedges. Where we need to be very precise is with the cutting angles. For example, once a fabric is folded, a cut needs to be exactly 90 degrees from the fold (not the selvedges!) in order to have a straight cut when the fabric is unfolded. The cause of the dreaded "V" cut in strips has nothing to do with grainline, but everything to do with whether the ruler was positioned exactly 90 degrees from the fold line.
    Are you old enough to remember pulling out a thread across the width of the fabric and cutting along it to find the straight of grain?
    and how we used to pull the fabric bias ways to straighten it? We used to get two ladies to pull hard - it was hard work! usually it worked, but sometimes we would wash a piece of a yard - no more than two yards, damp, and pull it hard on the bias until it was straight. It was worth the few minutes of work because it sewed so nicely.

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