Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 47 of 47

Thread: Teaching someone to quilt

  1. #26
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    S. W. Indiana
    Posts
    7,524
    Quote Originally Posted by quiltstringz View Post
    I agree with Artsy Girl - if she likes the style and colors it will be so much more fun for her. It's so much easier even now when I work on something that appeals to me - not that I don't do other things because everyone wants something different.
    I'd for sure let her have some say in the pattern----------teacher can judge the difficulty and absolutely have a say in the fabrics.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  2. #27
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,877
    I taught the daughter of a friend of mine to quilt, and we used this pattern. I had found it free online, can't find it any longer, and didn't it show up in "Quilters' Newletter Magazine"! I'm not sure whether the published pattern was by the same person, or the person who submitted the design just added a border to the free pattern, but in any case, the center is the very same, and was very easy for a beginner to learn. http://www.quiltersnewsletter.com/ar...ern_Brick_Wall

  3. #28
    Junior Member Grandma Kathy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Flat Rock, Michigan
    Posts
    103
    Turning Twenty is a good one. Takes 20 fat quarters. Very easy. Turns out great!
    Life is good when you make time for family and friends and of course quilting!

    Kathy Sinclair

  4. #29
    Super Member Lyncat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Buckeye AZ
    Posts
    1,225
    Is she wanting to learn the piecing, the quilting, or the whole shebang?

  5. #30
    Super Member kateyb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado
    Posts
    2,257
    A lady in our guild teaches a beginners class and uses the Churn Dash block. They learn both cutting squares and triangles and how to sew both. I personally like the Friendship Star. My first quilt was a log cabin Eleanor Burns way. There are a lot of 9 patch variations, maybe a sampler of various 9 patches. Large blocks on a small quilt would make it doable and not overwhelming.

  6. #31
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Fox Valley Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,937
    Start with something simple...something she likes...you want her to finish her first project to feel successful and want to go on to make more quilts. There are many simple patterns to choose from. Maybe even start with a table-runner or wallhanging/table-topper so it is a smaller project that will get done sooner and not take too long to complete. Second project could be a quilt.

  7. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    SW TN
    Posts
    589
    Remember to have some chocolate and all will perfect - especially if she is working with her favorite colors and her selected pattern. Are you taking her shopping first?


    Linda

    Sew little time and sew many ideas

  8. #33
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Small town in Northeast Oregon close to Washington and Idaho
    Posts
    2,733
    Blog Entries
    5
    Do a sampler quilt. Pick out 6 different easy blocks and have her do each one. She might get bored doing the same block over and over. The beginners quilt classes at our LQS do a sampler quilt with 4 blocks. I thought that was too little. 9 would be even better. You have some good ideas above, choose some and have her do them. She'll know quite a bit when her quilt is finished instead of knowing only one block.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  9. #34
    Senior Member YukonViv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Yukon Territory, Canada
    Posts
    407
    Blog Entries
    1
    I taught a friend to quilt. We started with a wall hanging size, she wanted a Christmas wall hanging and I had a pattern for an applique (simple fusible applique). So she learned to use steam a seam, blanket stitch around it, and then add a border. Then she was able to do a simple quilting around it and then bound it. Done in one day (she stayed up to finish her binding she told me!).

    so she learned a lot that first project and had a finished piece in one day. Really motivated her to keep going. Next we chose a sudoko quilt...again simple squares and then she was able to learn sashing. and she quilted it again herself and voila! Done.

    Keep it simple and small for the first thing, what if she finds she doesn't like quilting and has a whole project to finish? something that can be done in one day or two is perfect. Wall hanging, table runner.

    Have fun!!!!
    Vivian
    Yukon Territory, Canada
    www.quiltingunderthemidnightsun.blogspot.ca

  10. #35
    Senior Member YukonViv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Yukon Territory, Canada
    Posts
    407
    Blog Entries
    1
    Oh I should mention that she immediately then went into a Kaffe Fassett quilt and finished it up in one weekend. She is hooked!!!!
    Vivian
    Yukon Territory, Canada
    www.quiltingunderthemidnightsun.blogspot.ca

  11. #36
    Senior Member Bamagal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    443
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by jcrow View Post
    Do a sampler quilt. Pick out 6 different easy blocks and have her do each one. She might get bored doing the same block over and over. The beginners quilt classes at our LQS do a sampler quilt with 4 blocks. I thought that was too little. 9 would be even better. You have some good ideas above, choose some and have her do them. She'll know quite a bit when her quilt is finished instead of knowing only one block.
    This was actually the way I learned!! It was a 4 block wall hanging but when I went so crazy over piecing the teacher expanded it to 6 blockes. Each block taught a different technique ! I thought we would shop for fabric first then start with simple blocks!! Might have to hunt up my very first quilt!! Lol.

    Thanks everyone for the great ideas!! Please keep them coming!!

  12. #37
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Glendale AZ
    Posts
    1,520
    Is she familiar with her sewing machine? I start all my true sewing beginners on string blocks. They are forgiving on seams (until there is a BIT more confidence...then you don't have to be a task master to start). I taught 3 children from ages 6-12 this summer and we made string blocks till then end. By then they were ready to move on and made pillowcases. They even mastered my serger!
    Beth in AZ
    www.bzyqltr.blogspot.com
    Innova 22' with Lightning Stitch and Pantovision
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

  13. #38
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    My Sewing Room
    Posts
    1,184
    Blog Entries
    1
    One day when my sister and I were just playing around with her sewing machine, I taught her to make half-square triangles. She was thrilled, and we practiced making several, then arranging them in different designs. That is all it took to get her hooked on making quilt tops. So far, though, she isn't interested in doing the quilting part, except for very small items.
    jlm5419-an Okie back in Oklahoma!
    http://according-to-ginger.blogspot.com/

  14. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    St. George Ut.
    Posts
    310
    If she has sewn before, she will have the basic consept. So if it were me I would make sure it was not a big quilt to start with. A lap size would be good. Any simple pattern would be good.

  15. #40
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tallmadge, OH
    Posts
    5,059
    When I took lessons, we did a sampler quilt, too. Can't remember whether we did 9 squares or 12.

  16. #41
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central,CALIF.
    Posts
    268

  17. #42
    Senior Member Bamagal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    443
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by soccertxi View Post
    Is she familiar with her sewing machine? I start all my true sewing beginners on string blocks. They are forgiving on seams (until there is a BIT more confidence...then you don't have to be a task master to start). I taught 3 children from ages 6-12 this summer and we made string blocks till then end. By then they were ready to move on and made pillowcases. They even mastered my serger!
    Sounds great!! However I am beginning to think I have a REAL novice who hasn't used a machine. I have a basic machine I can teach her on if necessary!

  18. #43
    Senior Member Bamagal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    443
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by NUBQ View Post
    Wow!! Thats unique and fun!! Never seen it before!!
    Last edited by Bamagal; 09-08-2012 at 04:45 PM.

  19. #44
    Super Member KyKaren1949's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Owensboro, KY
    Posts
    1,420
    My first quilt was a Turning Twenty. It's so easy because the pieces are large and the blocks are as well. In fact, I'll be teaching it as a beginning quilting class for my church.
    Karen in Kentucky

  20. #45
    Super Member Krisb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Asheville, Lake Vermilion, Tarpon Springs
    Posts
    1,068
    Blog Entries
    27
    My first quilt was a sampler that had 20 blocks. The first ones were nine and four patch, then progressed to half square triangles, appliqué, etc. one block was a picture of our house. It was fun and a way to learn by beginning with simple blocks and progressing to more difficult ideas. It was a way to develop a good understanding of how a jilt block is designed and constructed. The quilt was on our bed for five years, and we still have it.
    I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. This makes it hard to plan the day.

  21. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Merritt Island, FL
    Posts
    661
    Blog Entries
    16
    It is late and I want to get to bed so I have not read all of the suggestions so please forgive me if I am (accidentally) repeating what someone else already said.

    I would suggest she start on something smaller such as placemats or a table runner. They are far less overwhelming and provide quicker gratification than a lap or bed quilt. I think rail fence goes quickly and is also easy to quilt and makes great placemats. You are an angel to share your knowledge and skills.

  22. #47
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,663
    I would choose a pattern that is easily accomplished and not too challenging so she gets the "feeling of accomplishment". I started sewing a couple of years ago, and took a beginner sewing class, and was thrilled to bring home a completed project "I made myself!" (I'm 50 yrs. old) It was a tote bag.

    After that I saw an ad about quilting and went and did that class. I loved the project but found myself at home alone trying to figure out how to complete it. I have learned a lot since, but I think a project that could be completed during the class would have boosted my enthusiasm and confidence.
    :-)
    CAS

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.