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Thread: Texture magic

  1. #1
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    Texture magic

    I am making a cup cake quilt for my granddaughter. Does anyone know (1) how well it stands up to washing and (2) if it will texture with the direction of the stitching (swirls, etc.)? I'm talking about the sheets and not the thread. I want to use it to give the frosting demension and design. I hope someone has experience, as the sheets are so expensive and hope to get advice before I start experimenting! Thanks!!!

  2. #2
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    I would interested in knowing this also!

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    Me too. I have never used it on a quilt

  4. #4
    Super Member Doreen's Avatar
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    You ca call Superior Threads and ask them about it. They will alswer questions about their products.

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    Nice name!!!

  6. #6
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    I know someone that uses it for her craft. But, you will have to experiment in order to see if it is going to do what you want...I know that she quilts a bit close together to get the desired effect.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  7. #7
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    I think it would be very cute for icing! I've used it on wall hangings, but the LQS has a jacket made with it that is lovely. The last wall hanging I did used texture magic for the tree trunk. We sewed "grain lines" for the trunk using TM, even knot holes. When it shrank it was amazingly realistic! Just remember to use a nice wide satin stitch to sew it down (if you're not piecing it) since it's a bit hard to control at the edges.

    Pam

  8. #8
    Super Member quiltsillysandi's Avatar
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    I've used it several times....and love it.....! I didn't have a pin foot for pin tucking in an applique piece I was doing, so I tried the TM and it worked great, actually liked it better....Making a purse now and used it on the outside pocket...Too Cute!! Go to you tube and type in Texture Magic Superior Threads...They have a series of videos all about TM....I counted as many as 18 in the series...I haven't washed anything yet, but I'm told that it washes great....And yes it will texture in the direction you sew, at least mine did....


    ;
    Have an inspring day!
    Sandi

  9. #9
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    I have used this a few times, the last time I found that if you hold it over a steaming kettle (with care and oven mitts on), it textures much faster than trying to use the steam from the iron.

  10. #10
    Super Member thimblebug6000's Avatar
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    I've never seen it used in an article that has been washed alot, only purses & toys, but hopefully it would keep it's shape.

  11. #11
    Junior Member jean knapp's Avatar
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    I love textue magic. I use it alot. It stands up to washing with no problems. I have been using it for rufffles on gd dresses. I just cut (for ruffls) for dresses or for ruffling on towels. Cut about 3 inches fold right sides together iron to make a band I cut about 1/2" of the tex mag and use the serpine stitch better than the zig zag about a 1/2 inch down and hold the steam iron over it. It curls like us used a ruffler. I save every scrape of if. Never goes straight in the wash would love to see it when you are done

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    I have it but haven't used it yet. I took a class with different techniques and we did the same look using elastic thread in the bobbin (had to hand wind it). When I got the sewing done we did the steam iron and it shrank; really cool watching it do that. I've never seen either one where you control the designs. We sewed about an inch apart but maybe if it was closer you'd have more control. I'm not sure.
    Judy

  13. #13
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    I've seen it used where the person stitched around certain design elements like flowers etc and then it shrank around that, emphasizing the flower. Very pretty technique.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GEMRM View Post
    I have used this a few times, the last time I found that if you hold it over a steaming kettle (with care and oven mitts on), it textures much faster than trying to use the steam from the iron.
    so then would a garment steamer work better??

  15. #15
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Patsy Thompson has 3 tutorials: http://youtu.be/m1aOhov6I5U and Superior Threads have about 10 info. videos which may help you:http://www.superiorthreads.com/videos/texture-magic/

  16. #16
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    I am not sure about the garment steamer, but I think anything that allows you to direct the steam up onto the fabric will be much faster and more effective than trying to direct steam down - nature wants to let it rise. I think it's the position of the fabric (up/over) the heat and steam rather than the tool producing the steam that is the reason for the outcome (if that makes sense).

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