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Thread: Thread in Septic Tank?

  1. #51
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    i always take mine (rag quilts ) to the laundromat i wait till i have about 4 done then use a big machine i tried in my washer once and didnt like the mess in my machine

  2. #52
    Senior Member newbiequilter's Avatar
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    I read the "threads" here about the threads in rag quilts. I made two before Christmas and took both of them to a really nice laundromat locally. For less than $5 I washed and dried both of them, read my book and relaxed for an hour.

  3. #53
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    Laundromat is an interesting suggestion. But.....our whole town is using septics. (Supposedly the largest town in US to still be on septic. Paradise, CA) The laundromat has no stipulations on what can be washed. I wonder if they have ever thought of thread and lint. Heaven knows I send a lot of pet hair into the system plus all the lint off of my microfiber dustmop cloths.

  4. #54
    Senior Member newbiequilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjdutro
    Laundromat is an interesting suggestion. But.....our whole town is using septics. (Supposedly the largest town in US to still be on septic. Paradise, CA) The laundromat has no stipulations on what can be washed. I wonder if they have ever thought of thread and lint. Heaven knows I send a lot of pet hair into the system plus all the lint off of my microfiber dustmop cloths.
    Well come on down the road to Yuba City and use a couple of our very nice laundromats (only two actually)....

  5. #55
    Member mjdutro's Avatar
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    I just might take you up on that! Yuba is not far.

  6. #56
    Senior Member AudreyB's Avatar
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    When I wash a rag quilt, I run it through the dryer for 10 minutes first, to get the loose threads. then I wash it. In the washer, I open the lid often and scoop the threads off the top, in both the wash and rinse cycles. I get a lot of threads that would otherwise go down the drain. I also wash (and scoop threads) three times before I put it in the dryer. Then I check the dryer vent every ten minutes. Hope this helps someone.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by KathyAire
    When I made a rag quilt, someone at one of the quilting classes told me 'if you have a septic system (as opposed to city waste system), wash your rag quilts at the laundromat'. That has always stuck with me and that is what I do. Don't know if it's true or not, but I do know there is not too many things worse than septic problems.
    GOOD POINT!

  8. #58
    Super Member ladyredhawk's Avatar
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    WOW I'm so glad I read this I don't have a septic tank i'm on city but my provider takes my quilts home and she is on a tank. This is great ty for sharing ladies.

  9. #59
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    [quote=AudreyB]When I wash a rag quilt, I run it through the dryer for 10 minutes first, to get the loose threads. then I wash it. In the washer, I open the lid often and scoop the threads off the top, in both the wash and rinse cycles. I get a lot of threads that would otherwise go down the drain. I also wash (and scoop threads) three times before I put it in the dryer. Then I check the dryer vent every ten minutes. Hope this helps someone.[/quote

    Great idea! I'm going to try it. Thanks.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ritacarl
    Quote Originally Posted by didi
    Someone mentioned washing quilts if you have a septic tank.
    I have noticed when I wash my quilts after sewing them, I get alot of thread in my washer. At least when I do the Rag Quilts. Does this hurt my septic tank???
    How often do you have you septic tank pumped? In our county we have to do it every 3 years. I can't see that it will be any more of a problem than hair.
    once yearly.

  11. #61
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee
    Rid-X is NOT necessary if you have a septic system. All it is is a form of yeast that naturally forms anyway. Experts will tell you that you really don't need it. What you want to avoid is bleach and other anti-bacterial products, which will kill the bacteria necessary for the breakdown of solids in the septic tank. Adding something like Rid-X after using bleach isn't going to help, because the bleach will kill the bacteria in Rid-X too.

    Cotton is not going to hurt your septic, because it is biodegradable. It's going to rot away. The problem would be that until it does, if you do many rag quilts, you could at least temporarily clog your leach field and cause problems. I would think the problem would be if you're not using a 100% natural batting. Polyester fibers are not going to degrade, they WILL cause problems.

    All in all, the laundromat is not a bad idea...
    I've heard this too. We use very little bleach (maybe 1/2 cup once every other week in the wash) and NO antibacterial soaps at all. I hate that stuff. I've also heard that garbage disposals don't play well with septic but I have no idea if that's true. We don't have a sink disposal and I rinse dishes (and throw away the solids) before I put them in the dishwasher. I use those screen things in my kitchen sink to keep the junk from going down the drain.

  12. #62
    Senior Member CircleSquare's Avatar
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    CAUTION
    I've only read the first page and I agree with most of it. There is only one problem with going to the laundromat. Many people use a lot of bleach and there could be bleach residue in the washer! I washed a king size quilt at a laundromat. The quilt had a lot of black fabric and it got faded quite a bit in the wash! Obviously there was bleach still in the machine!

  13. #63
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    [quote=Betty K]I am on a septic system - I don't snip the visible seam allowance. When I finish a rag quilt, while I'm watching tv I pull most of the threads from the seam allowance so very little is left to shed in whatever machine I use.

    Now that is a good idea - just pull the threads and no painful fingers and wrist after ages with the scissors. Thank you very much - I think I'm much clloser to doing a rag quilt now.

  14. #64
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    Nothing like Rid-X, etc - a sales gimmick. Bleach can be used, but sparingly. I know of people who use bleach on EVERYTHING - she's a germaphobic or whatever.
    I was told never to make rag quilts for babies,especially, nor very small children as they have a habit of putting things in their mouth and sucking on them. Can you imagine the strings that child could pull out.
    Take them to a laundromat as strings can jam up a washer, too, before it goes thru the hose. Someone told me all of this a long time ago and guess she had a bad experience, so she researched it.

  15. #65
    Super Member Slow2Sew's Avatar
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    I take rag quilts to a commercial machine in a laundry mat.

  16. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee
    Rid-X is NOT necessary if you have a septic system. All it is is a form of yeast that naturally forms anyway. Experts will tell you that you really don't need it. What you want to avoid is bleach and other anti-bacterial products, which will kill the bacteria necessary for the breakdown of solids in the septic tank. Adding something like Rid-X after using bleach isn't going to help, because the bleach will kill the bacteria in Rid-X too.

    Cotton is not going to hurt your septic, because it is biodegradable. It's going to rot away. The problem would be that until it does, if you do many rag quilts, you could at least temporarily clog your leach field and cause problems. I would think the problem would be if you're not using a 100% natural batting. Polyester fibers are not going to degrade, they WILL cause problems.

    All in all, the laundromat is not a bad idea...
    Hi Charlee, We live in the country with 2-tanks. We had
    them cleaned out and we used Rid-X. The tank peopple said to use a yeast pack for each tank, we've had no trouble, but, with a new rag quilt, it may be wise to go to
    the laundry mat.

  17. #67
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    Thanks for the tip, I'm almost finished with my first rag quilt and I will definetly go to the laundromat. we have a septic tank.

  18. #68
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    Thanks for the tip, I'm almost finished with my first rag quilt and I will definetly go to the laundromat. we have a septic tank.

  19. #69
    Super Member cr12cats's Avatar
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    in the desert we got a blue tubing and put it on the hose of the washer and put it out the gargae door to the yard. that way the yatd got watered and saved alot on watering the grass the yard loved it and was always green. any lint piles just got raked up when doing the yard. when we had draught problems others were asking how the grass was green then 3 other families starting doing it on our small block.

  20. #70
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlee
    Rid-X is NOT necessary if you have a septic system. All it is is a form of yeast that naturally forms anyway. Experts will tell you that you really don't need it. What you want to avoid is bleach and other anti-bacterial products, which will kill the bacteria necessary for the breakdown of solids in the septic tank. Adding something like Rid-X after using bleach isn't going to help, because the bleach will kill the bacteria in Rid-X too.

    Cotton is not going to hurt your septic, because it is biodegradable. It's going to rot away. The problem would be that until it does, if you do many rag quilts, you could at least temporarily clog your leach field and cause problems. I would think the problem would be if you're not using a 100% natural batting. Polyester fibers are not going to degrade, they WILL cause problems.

    All in all, the laundromat is not a bad idea...
    Charlee is right, the cotton should not hurt the tank. Glenn

  21. #71
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    I understand why you would clog up stuff in the septic tank but what happens to the threads in a laundramat? do you just clog up the city water works plant?
    Also if you give the rag quilt away, do you tell the new owner how to wash it safely? Or ask if they have a septic tank? Just wondering.

  22. #72
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    When I make a Rag Quilt, I always put it in a large calico bag so that any loose threads stay wihtin the bag. When you take the quilt out of the bag after it has been washed you just have to give it a good shake outside and the threads simply shake off. Just amke sue you do this OUTSIDE!!! Good luck!

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