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Thread: Thread-is it sewing, quilting or overlocker?

  1. #1
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    Thread-is it sewing, quilting or overlocker?

    I was given a big bag full of cones of thread. All of these are new, purchased recently from manufacturer. Labels state 100% cotton 50/2 or 40/3 for "sewing, quilting and serging".

    As the threads are a bit fuzzy upon close inspection, I sampled a selection with a bit of FMQ; some threads snapped and shredded while others were fine. Some thread snaps easily just by pulling between fingers, others not so.

    Is this really just overlocking/serging tread (I don't dress make or have a serger)? If so, I will pass the bag on to someone who does. Or do you think the thread is a bum lot only suitable for basting or bin it?

    How do I tell the difference?

    Thanks

    Hettyb

  2. #2
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    The threads that pass the tug test go ahead and keep/ use, some cotton threads do tend to be a little more ( linty)
    if they are too weak for the tug test they may still work fine for embroidery or serger use, pass them on if you have no desire to use them.
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  3. #3
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    I agree. An individual gave me a bag of thread like that. Said she just didn't like the brand. It was divvied to different friends but informing them why I didn't want some of it. One let's her grands use it to practice hand stitching and mending.
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    The threads that pass the tug test go ahead and keep/ use, some cotton threads do tend to be a little more ( linty)
    if they are too weak for the tug test they may still work fine for embroidery or serger use, pass them on if you have no desire to use them.

  4. #4
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    I have both a serger and an embroidery machine. Serger threads are usually 100% polyester, and embroidery threads are usually rayon or polyester. If the thread is prone to breakage, I wouldn't want to use it in either machine. Not worth the headache.

  5. #5
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    If threads break easily, I would use them ONLY for hand basting. Or put them in the waste basket. Or if they are pretty, for decoration - like in a basket or a jar.

  6. #6
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    Serger threads are not mostly 100% polyester. Most often they are cotton. However, they are generally not long staple cotton. Either of the sizes you mention are fine for serging because of the multiple threads. If they do not pass the 'tug' test I would not quilt with them. I do not piece with serger thread; however, there are people who do. Serger thread loses tensile strength because of its low twist. I do not have an embroidery machine so I cannot comment on that aspect of their use.

  7. #7
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
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    I piece with serger thread all the time, but only if it passes the "tug test". I would never quilt with it.
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  8. #8
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    I agree with Trapunta!

  9. #9
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    I think we all agree that if the thread breaks easily, it's not something we want to use in our projects, other than for basting.

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