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Thread: Thread.....?

  1. #1
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    All of my thread, aside from a few huge spools that I suspect are for a overlock, came from my grandma. She was 94 when she passed on, so, a lot of them are on wooden and foam spools. Can I still use then, or will they not work as well? I read an article about it, but it didn't say anything about plastic?
    Thanks
    Emily

  2. #2
    Senior Member crashnquilt's Avatar
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    You need to test the thread for how easily it will break. I, personally, would not use it just because of it's age. I've not seen wooden or foam spools for many years.

  3. #3
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    Yes - it's very likely to be rotten. I would probably just use them for decoration.

  4. #4
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    I've bought spools of thread at auctions and yard sales and have used them without problems. I wouldn't use the real cheap thread that they sale for 3/1.00 or .59 cents or similar. But like crashnquilt mentioned, I would test it to be sure it doesn't break too easily.

  5. #5
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    I forgot to say a lot of the thread I've gotten at auctions were on wooden spools, so I would test it and if okay I would go ahead and use them. My 2 cents worth.

  6. #6

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    Emily, I have a good friend that has quilted since the early 70's and most of her threads are exactly what you are asking about. She picks many of her bundles up at auctions, etc. She tests the threads by pulling and testing how quick they break. If they are strong, she treads on:))She makes about a quilt a day-a serious addict:)). No kiddding! For me personally, I'd opt to keep the wooden spools w/threads due to their decorating prospects and history:)) Skeat

  7. #7
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
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    I agree with test them and use them. :D All the ones I have got have been good except one :D

  8. #8

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    I have heard that you can freeze the thread in the freezer to "freshen" it and that will help it not to break so much.

  9. #9
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    I use thread like this for basting my quilts and my applique

  10. #10
    english rose's Avatar
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    Try putting them in the freezer for a day. Then test for strength and use if ok.

  11. #11
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    I have wooden spools on my thread rack. Use them only for decoration and for catching dust. :lol:

  12. #12
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    Whatever you decide to do DON'T throw away the wooden spools.

  13. #13
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    Thanks :) And, no I won't throw them out. They were from my grandma, and I stuck a few in the freezer last night so.... :lol:

  14. #14
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    I've never had any problems at all with thread from wooden spools, including some that I know to be over 60 years old. I think the parts most apt to be weakened are the outside that has been exposed to light and the inside that has been in contact to the wood.

    I do not use mine for areas that will receive a lot of stress, like jeans repair, but, since my functional quilts are all longarmed, I use it for any and all parts of my quilt tops and wall quilts. I have some beautiful silk thread from post-war Europe that I sometimes use as embelishment. The colors are to die for!

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