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Turned-Edge Applique Background

Turned-Edge Applique Background

Old 04-07-2021, 02:08 PM
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Default Turned-Edge Applique Background

I've never done any turned-edge applique before. I hardly ever use patterns because I find them too hard to understand.

I watched a video class on how to do freezer-paper turned-edge applique and am trying to figure out a block. Instead of starting with a small trial square, I've jumped head first into making a 36" x 36" block. LOL! There is a steep learning curve, but I'm having a good time so far.

Here is my question to y'all who are experienced in this method. Do you put a light fusible stablizer on the background fabric to make it easier to put on the applique pieces? I saw one video class that recommended Pellon Easy Knit Stablizer (EK-130) for under the applique pieces. Wouldn't it be beneficial to use it on the whole background?
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Old 04-07-2021, 04:10 PM
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Well I guess you could, but it will make the quilt thicker and heavier, and harder to quilt through. Usually once you sew the applique on, you cut away the background.

Regarding the class that recommended putting something under the applique pieces - I've done that when my applique is a lighter color than the background and I'm not planning on cutting away the dark background. It's done so you don't see the dark background showing through the lighter applique.
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Old 04-07-2021, 04:51 PM
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If you are hand sewing down needle turn appliqué, putting something on the background fabric is going to make it harder to get the needle through. Also a light box is handy to get your pieces in the correct placement. Watch for sewing down the pieces in the correct order as some pieces may need to go on top of others.
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Old 04-07-2021, 05:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
Regarding the class that recommended putting something under the applique pieces - I've done that when my applique is a lighter color than the background and I'm not planning on cutting away the dark background. It's done so you don't see the dark background showing through the lighter applique.
This class recommended putting the stablizer on the back of the background fabric, not between the applique piece and the front of the background fabric. (Although, your suggestion is brilliant for a light piece on a dark background! Thank you!!!) Putting it behind the applique pieces is what had me wondering why it couldn't be put on the whole back of the background fabric. I've never tried this before, and I wonder how the background fabric can remain stable without being stretched out by putting the applique pieces on it.
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Old 04-07-2021, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
If you are hand sewing down needle turn appliqué, putting something on the background fabric is going to make it harder to get the needle through. Also a light box is handy to get your pieces in the correct placement. Watch for sewing down the pieces in the correct order as some pieces may need to go on top of others.
I'm going to be machine sewing the turned-edge applique pieces with monofiliment thread.
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Old 04-07-2021, 06:14 PM
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I've found I prefer not to, and have been learning the appliquik method.

I glue the template to the fabric, then press under the edge all around. remove the template (use elmers school glue and it come off easy). then I trim the seam allowance to about 1/8" and use the special glue and tools to turn it under. From there you can sew by hand or machine (I like to narrow zigzag with invisible thread). The stick glue also washes out so in the end there is no stiffness. I'll use the elmer's to stick to in place to sew, that way I can reposition if needed, and it's not stuck down to the point I can't get under when hand sewing.

For the hand sewing, I may not glue the edge down, but pressing it around the template gives a really nice crease to work with.

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Old 04-07-2021, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by JENNR8R View Post
I saw one video class that recommended Pellon Easy Knit Stablizer (EK-130) for under the applique pieces.
Originally Posted by JENNR8R View Post
This class recommended putting the stablizer on the back of the background fabric, not between the applique piece and the front of the background fabric.
Sorry, I guess I misunderstood what you meant by "under the applique pieces" in your first post.

I still say it is not necessary to stabilize the background fabric before appliqueing. I've done a LOT of applique, both hand and machine, and I've *never* had my fabric stretch.

The only time I've ever thought it might be a good idea to put a stabilizer underneath is when you're doing a very thick satin stitch on the raw edges of the applique. The stitching itself can tend to "tunnel" and warp the fabric.

eta: Why don't you try a test piece without stabilizer on a couple of scrap pieces and see for yourself?

Last edited by Peckish; 04-07-2021 at 06:58 PM.
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Old 04-08-2021, 06:07 AM
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The only way I've dealt with the background is to cut it several inches larger and zizag the edge so it won't fray.

Needle turn is a lot different than embroidery. You need to be able to flex the fabric so you can get the tiny stitches in without them showing. With embroidery, you want the stiches to show and not blend in, so having stabilizer helps to keep them "on the top". And with the usually longer stitches with embroidery, it gets a lot easier to pull too tight and gather the fabric, so the stabilizer (or hoop) helps keep it firm enough so keep you from doing that, yet you can pull the stitching thread tighter to get a more even lay, since it is visible.

With needle turn, you have to learn not to pull the thread tight, just snug enough to hold but not create a pucker. I also like to put a knot in about every 1"-2" to help anchor so I don't accidentally start pulling the thread tighter.

If you really feel that stabilizing the back might help as you are learning, consider a wash away stabilizer. That way when you are done, there will be nothing left to stiffen it up
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Old 04-08-2021, 07:00 AM
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My favorite form of applique is needle turn and I haven't done any in years. I believe it give the most crisp pieces. This is where my wand iron works the best. I would not put the Pellon Easy Knit Stabilizer on the back ground fabric. This would make things to heavy. Talk about hands hurting if you are hand stitching.
The learning curve is not so difficult. I think it only took me a single block of what I would do to master placements and stitching.
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Old 04-09-2021, 06:10 AM
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I use fusible interfacing, place the nubby glue side down on right side of fabric, stitch your shape, etc . Watch Fons & porter :sew Easy interfacing applique on YouTube.
you have a perfect edge without needle turning and some fusible to hold the applique on to your background fabric. After turning, I trim the fusible, so there is only fusible around the edge. You can leave all the fusible on the applique if you wish.
I dont think I understand about your wanting to put interfacing all over your background fabric.
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